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Can I do this?

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  • Can I do this?

    I have an old circular sawmill. The blade has insert type teeth, comprising of the shank which holds the teeth inside sockets milled into the blade. The teeth are called bits. They are small -roughly 1 1/2" long and 1/4" thick.
    The teeth are a discontinued item for my size blade/teeth style. Can I braze carbide to the inserts?
    This gets done for everything else I don't see why this cannot be done. Comments?

  • #2
    Abner, it might be easier to find a new blade that has insert support for it instead of trying to braze on carbide tips.
    Dan.

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    • #3
      Yes they are available. @ $2,500.00.

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      • #4
        Would it be possible for you to post a picture of the blade and the teeth?
        How to become a millionaire: Start out with 10 million and take up machining as a hobby!

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        • #5
          Yes !

          Rich

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          • #6
            Carbide can be shaped with a joint to take Silver Solder.
            Much is possible if thought out correctly, but good pics.
            Detailed pics, of the blade, the sockets, and what you have left for teeth
            are needed to give any further advice.

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            • #7
              The blade takes inserted HSS teeth. Yes? Have you taken the blade to a good saw sharpener, one that regularly does large sawmill blades? Their opinion on a possible carbide refit would probably be the most accurate.

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              • #8
                Have you tried e-bay for someone with a stock of old bits? I recall "touring" an abandoned sawmill, and there were literally cases of insert bits, still in boxes.
                Duffy, Gatineau, Quebec

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                • #9
                  If you have the bits I'd have them sharpened. I had a Bel-Saw that had the same bits & lost a holder. They are out there some where. I'd try the vintage tractor type or other old equip forums. Run an ad on sawmillexchange.com. I had a Mobile Dimensian 3 bladed mill that IMHO is the best made. 1st week I cut 18750 bd ft of northern hemlock by myself with 1 rain day. With that mill whatever size you wanted came off with no resawing or even log turning needed. Really miss doing it.
                  "Let me recommend the best medicine in the
                  world: a long journey, at a mild season, through a pleasant
                  country, in easy stages."
                  ~ James Madison

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                  • #10
                    Here is a bit, this one is brand new.



                    Brand new shank and bits. Shank operates as a spring to hold the teeth into the socket.

                    These are factory carbide bits off the web of a different style. Carbide bits for my size are also discontinued.


                    I have looked on e-bay- nothing. Any supplier I have found is out. I have a clamp on the blade type sharpener, availability is the issue.
                    The teeth are (?) I think -tool steel- sharpens with a file.
                    I have never brazed or silver soldered carbide. I think with a chainsaw grinding disc I can grind a spot for the carbide @ 1/8" thick.

                    The blade is 42" in dia. has 24 teeth. Runs 600 RPM with 125 hp. Each tooth takes roughly 1/16" cut. Cuts @ 75' per min. Makes incredible noise and wonderful smells.
                    Last edited by Abner; 01-16-2015, 04:06 PM.

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                    • #11
                      What's the style/type of this tooth. It's been a while but I thought the went in letter form. Let me know & I'll see about finding you a stash of hopefully carbide which in my case went 4 to 5 times longer between sharpening than hss.
                      Have you considered machining the blade to take available locks & teeth?
                      "Let me recommend the best medicine in the
                      world: a long journey, at a mild season, through a pleasant
                      country, in easy stages."
                      ~ James Madison

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                      • #12
                        The teeth are 4-1/2 x 7/8 x 5/16". 5/16" being the tooth width.
                        There are 2 1/2's and 3's available. My understanding is that these were used in east coast hardwood mills. Looking at pictures it would seem the anvil portion behind the tooth is shorter on the 3's, so it is possible I could cut some of the diameter off the blade, but if I have to get it rehammered then I have to drive to Seattle as the local guys are all gone.

                        Thanks,
                        Mine is a Belsaw as well. Lighter weight but it can square up a beam at 16". I'm building a bandsaw sawmill currently but just can't get away from those circle marks on the lumber.
                        Last edited by Abner; 01-16-2015, 04:33 PM.

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                        • #13
                          I only had to have 1 hammered & I was amazed at watching him do it. All he needed was the rpm which was 600 I think.It was worth the $40 or $50 to watch. What an art!
                          "Let me recommend the best medicine in the
                          world: a long journey, at a mild season, through a pleasant
                          country, in easy stages."
                          ~ James Madison

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                          • #14
                            Let me make sure I understand, do you need shanks , bit's or both & what size are they stamp & regular or oversized? I would think some small shop would make the discontinued sizes because I know it's a problem with old blades/mills. Let me know * I'll do my best to find them. Thanks!
                            "Let me recommend the best medicine in the
                            world: a long journey, at a mild season, through a pleasant
                            country, in easy stages."
                            ~ James Madison

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                            • #15
                              Maybe this will be of some help...

                              Here's a "bit" of terminology regarding saw blades: Yours is a "Style 4-1/2".

                              http://www.smithhamilton.com/catalog...ed/it.saw.html

                              This page came from the smith Hamilton Company and they list an 800 phone number. You might give them a call and see if they can provide you with some additional direction...

                              http://www.smithhamilton.com/

                              or this company... http://www.piperssaw.com/

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