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  • Metal Rescue

    I have a seized up part that I need to get apart. I have tried penetrating oils and sprays and got no where. I wonder if an ultrasonic cleaner may help? I also have a jug of "Metal Rescue". Seems like good stuff. But it says "Metal Rescue™ is not recommended for use on magnesium or magnesium alloys". Now the part I am working on is a small tube with a rusty thread, threaded into some sort of "white" metal. How do I figure out if that "white" metal has any magnesium in it?

    The rusty part is shown down inside and the nut turns on the thread. It should turn with just a light force with your thumb so I'm thinking it isn't a tight thread.



    Any ideas?

    Here is a link to the product if any one is interested: http://www.metalrescue.com/home.aspx


    Thanks
    Menessis
    Last edited by Menessis; 01-22-2015, 06:50 PM.

  • #2
    Sounds like Evaporust...
    Joe

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    • #3
      You may well have one of those cases where two dissimilar metals have, through electrolytic action, "grown" into each other at the contact area.Not much will overcome that except brute force, and you will destroy one or both parts.
      Brian Rupnow

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by Menessis View Post
        Now the part I am working on is a small tube with a rusty thread, threaded into some sort of "white" metal. How do I figure out if that "white" metal has any magnesium in it?

        The rusty part is shown down inside and the nut turns on the thread.
        Is there some reason that the object's purpose justifies use of Magnesium,
        a more-readily available/affordable metal now than in the past,
        but still expensive to acquire/fabricate relative to other choices.

        If not, what does Metal Rescue say about compatibility with
        zinc. I propose that your part could be die-cast.

        .

        Comment


        • #5
          Put a drop on a non critical place on the white metal & see if it has adverse effects. I bet you'll be OK.

          Comment


          • #6
            Before you use anything "rust removal" boil it in detergent water to get rid of the oils/grease.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by brian Rupnow View Post
              You may well have one of those cases where two dissimilar metals have, through electrolytic action, "grown" into each other at the contact area.Not much will overcome that except brute force, and you will destroy one or both parts.
              My thought as well...

              May be time to start thinking about how you will make or buy a replacement!

              Comment


              • #8
                Well the only thing the Metal Rescue will harm is Magnesium. I just found an answer of sorts. A little citric acid on magnesium will react with it right away.

                That part is a throttle grip off of a helicopter. It wasn't seized when it was removed. But who knows how long it has been sitting like that. Now it's stuck real good!

                Any more ideas how to get it unstuck?

                Menessis

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                • #9
                  Electrolysis?

                  Tim

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                  • #10
                    Electroysis is not a good solution for "hidden" rust.

                    Use Evaporust. Doesn't affect "magnesium". Degrease first... with hot water/detergent. Won't be quick on a fine thread, but it will get there. Keep the solution 90-120F (light bulb works well).

                    BTW.. the part will not be "magnesium". If it has any, it's a mag alloy - Aluminum with Magnesium.
                    Last edited by lakeside53; 01-22-2015, 08:50 PM.

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                    • #11
                      If you took the nut off completely will the center sleeve just pull out? It almost looks like a nut holding a flange of sorts captive under it. Is the end we can't see open or closed? If open, would a custom made drift coax it out?

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by brian Rupnow View Post
                        You may well have one of those cases where two dissimilar metals have, through electrolytic action, "grown" into each other at the contact area.Not much will overcome that except brute force, and you will destroy one or both parts.
                        I agree, too. If that is a helicopter part it could well have a higher magnesium content than "normal" magnesium/aluminum alloys. It tends to corrode badly under the right conditions, doesn't weld well and generally can be a b*tch to work with. Might be time to walk away...
                        Keith
                        __________________________
                        Just one project too many--that's what finally got him...

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          I posted once on something like this a while back...I literally stumbled on the solution for me anyhow. The reaction between the alloy and ,usually, steel or SS causes the less "noble" metal to corrode and the products of this corrosion take up more volume than the original metals did....locking everything together. I've seen it crack open the alloy casting holding a stern drive unit in place. As stated above, clean off all oils or rust release agents first. Then heat the part a bit till too hot to touch and stick it in WATER. Cool > repeat > > as necessary. What I found was the corrosion products of, in my case alum alloy, are water soluble. Heating to about boiling temp and then putting in water should cause the water to be drawn in to the interface of the two metals. Repeating drives some in and some out but then quenching again draws more in. I was able to free up a steering shaft for a tractor that I had been heating and beating for two days before I found this.
                          In any event, let us know what worked. Good luck :>))

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            ATF and aceton is proven treatment for parts rusted together.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Hi Gary. It's hard to explain. But I will give it a try. The nut threads on to a very short piece of rusty tubing. Maybe about 1/2" long tops. That rusty tube has a slot cut in it on the inside which slides on a tiny pin that is set in the aluminium tube that is inside of everything. I'm guessing that that slot isn't full length otherwise the nut would slide off the top. As is the nut and the rusty bit of tube slide freely up and down about 3/16". The problem with it is that the threaded part is how the tension is set on the throttle grip. And as if that's not enough the nut is in the way of the hole where the pin goes to locks the throttle handle on the shaft.

                              I like the repeated heating and cooling idea. I wonder if I put it on the stove in boiling water and go back and forth to cold tap water would work. ATF and acetone, mixed together?

                              BTW....I can't walk away! It's mine.

                              Thanks
                              Menessis

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