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  • Lathes and Mills you currently have at home?

    Last summer I was motivated to get the shop finished, mainly due to the month my wife and daughter were visiting my mother in law. I wasn’t working, so it gave me some time to get going on it (and other projects I had). Around that time as some deals came up I bought a Chun Hung 400x1100, a HaRo universal grinder and old project mill drill. I now had 3 lathes and 3 mills so this led me to sell my Standard Modern Metric 11x20 and my Tom Senior mill to give me some additional room.

    Since then work has been progressing on my shop, all the walls are insulated and sheeted in OSB and I have the heater working. I have been looking at the suggestions for shop layout and planning and I have a rough idea where everything should go and what should be moved to storage in a different stall. I am working on a RPC and then I can get the Chin Hung and the HaRo operational.

    I used the search on the site here for “shop layout” ideas and got some good ones. As I was looking at the pictures of guy’s shops, I came across quite a few pics with the lathe and/or mill at an angle which made it difficult to read the make.

    I thought I would start a thread on the Lathes and Mills that you currently have in your shop, and maybe add a picture if you can. Are you happy with them? Any comments about them?

    I guess I will start...

    Standard Modern 11x34 Imperial– I had this at least 12 years, no problems with it. I wish it had a hardened bed and a slightly larger spindle hole. (This pic is before we moved, there is too much stuff in front of it to take a pic now)



    Chun Hung 400x1100 – Looks good as far as a lathe can be without power. I need to finish my RPC to get it running. (This pic is when I bought it, there is too much stuff in front of it to take a pic now)



    Burke Millrite ... Love it, if I were able to change something it would be a slightly longer quill stroke and maybe a fine feed for the quill.



    Mill drill ZX-30 project. I bought it for a song, but it sat outside in the weather for 2 years. I have about 20 hours into it so far, but still need at least that that to get her running.


  • #2
    I only have two mills and two lathes and two welders.

    The small stuff;
    HF (Harbor Freight) micro mill with the after-market extra length table. The table came with new (imperial) leadscrew. I use it for small quick work. That's a mini-mag flashlight on the 2 inch vice.




    Cummings 7x12 lathe. A Sieg import. It has imperial leadscrews on it as part of the leadscrew encoder based DRO. QCTP, of course. It's my go-to lathe for anything under 6 inches long. It's amazing how much work it can do.


    Lincoln SP100+ MIG welder. Good for gas or flux core up to 1/8 inch in single pass. A craigslist find.

    The bigger stuff;
    HF 9x20 lathe. Another Seig import, 4 times the weight of the benchtop model. I use this one occasionally for larger diameter or longer work.

    Taiwan 6x26 knee mill. Name plate says Standard Machinery Mfg, 1979. VFD drives a 2 HP motor. .0002 "Sino" 3 axis dro. Nearly 6 foot tall and around 1000 lbs. Bought it slightly used.



    AHP 200 amp Alphatig TIG/stick welder. It's amazing what one can successfully make with a good tig welder with minimal training. Little delicate parts, bigger and sturdier parts.

    I have the world's messiest shop, so no pictures.
    Last edited by danlb; 02-08-2015, 08:13 PM. Reason: The thread needs pictures.
    At the end of the project, there is a profound difference between spare parts and extra parts.

    Location: SF East Bay.

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    • #3
      Since you had the Burke why would you want a clapped out mill/drill?
      The shortest distance between two points is a circle of infinite diameter.

      Bluewater Model Engineering Society at https://sites.google.com/site/bluewatermes/

      Southwestern Ontario. Canada

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      • #4
        Originally posted by loose nut View Post
        Since you had the Burke why would you want a clapped out mill/drill?
        I can't speak for him, but I find myself using the micro mill, the drill press and the knee mill at various times. Doing a second op without breaking down the setup on the mill can be handy.

        Dan
        At the end of the project, there is a profound difference between spare parts and extra parts.

        Location: SF East Bay.

        Comment


        • #5
          Small lathe- Unimat DB-200- now converted onto a solid cast bed with dovetails. Home-built motor using super magnets, but with the original armature. The main reason I wanted to upgrade this and keep it is because the head swivels- makes it easy to cut tapers, even fairly long ones. This is a work in progress.

          Larger lathe, Advance 8x18. Dc motor now, plus ultra- low rpm drive using a mobility scooter motor and gearbox- final drive using a V belt to a 13 inch diameter pulley on the spindle. Obviously, this is also a dc motor.

          Another lathe/mill combo- started as a cast iron Delta wood lathe, and has been beefed up with extra ribbing. Vertical column added- made from the bed extension piece that you could get for these lathes. Dc motor also, microV belt drive. The mill part will be a high speed spindle, direct drive with dc motor. This is also a work in progress.

          The mill is a round column- don't even know what make, although that doesn't matter. The name plate has long since been discarded, making way for a downfeed dial indicator. These things are what they are. Mine has been upgraded with a vertical guide bar to keep the head aligned as you crank it up and down, and I've added a power supply and motor drives to the x and y axis. Not CNC- just motors to replace hand cranking.

          I really would like a sturdier mill, but it will have to come with it's own shop space- I have none left.
          I seldom do anything within the scope of logical reason and calculated cost/benefit, etc- I'm following my passion-

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          • #6
            2-clausing 6300 12x36 lathes, clausing colchester 6500 12x36 lathe, lodge & shipley 12x36 lathe, lodge & shipley 14x36 lathe.
            8x36 enco mill, shop fox 10x40 horizontal/vertical mill.
            ammco disc,drum brake,flywheel, lathe.
            westhoff horizontal drilling milling machine.
            16" cincinnati HD shaper, 7" atlas shaper, 7" south bend shaper.
            2 delta milwaukee toolmaker surface grinders.
            2 mig welders, 2 arc welders.
            10x20 wells horizontal bandsaw.
            8x24 and a 8x16 kalamazoo horizontal bandsaws.
            6x12 marvel horizontal bandsaw.
            4x6 and a 7x12 accura hor/vert bandsaws.
            6",7",10" pedestal grinders, sellers and lisle drill grinders, accufinish honer, climax portable keymill, 6" carbide grinder.
            3 ton arbor press, 30 ton hyd. press.
            3 delta milwaukee 17" drill press's one is the bench type,2 are floor models one has the power feed attachment, the other has the slow speed attachment.
            craftsman 15" floor model drill press, craftsman 34" radial drill press, 2 delta rockwell 15" 6+6 bench model drill press's, 2 15" delta rockwell bench model drill press's, a newer style delta rockwell 17" floor model drill press under restoration. pro turn 34" radial arm drill.
            12" craftsman,12" dayton,14" peerless, 14" keller power hacksaws.
            oster pipe threader, 14" powermatic vertical wood'metal bandsaw.
            I didn't have enough time to post all this before.
            Last edited by ENTERPRISE LATHE; 02-09-2015, 09:22 PM.

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            • #7
              in my shop;
              14 1/2" southbend with 8' bed 250 amp Hobart water cooled tig welder
              9" south bend with 4' bed 250 amp miller mig welder
              9x42 enco vertical mill bought new 225 amp Lincoln gas drive stick welder
              clausing 6 x 24 vertical mill
              burke 8 x 36 horizontal mill
              12" Vernon shaper
              6 x18 jones and shipmen surface grinder

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              • #8
                Shop Fox 12 x 36 lathe and 9 x 49 mill with X/Y DRO and added Z Igage. Two bandsaws, grinders, etc, etc. The good news is I HOPE to retire and move this from my business to home where I can putter

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by loose nut View Post
                  Since you had the Burke why would you want a clapped out mill/drill?
                  I bought it mostly to use as a drill press, my DP is a smaller undersized Craftsman. I thought this would make pretty good drill press. I sold the Tom Senior because it had a fixed quill, so you had to move the table up or down.

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                  • #10
                    I have a Hobart Handler 135 welder that comes in handy from time to time (really great to use when I do need it, been very happy with it), a Delta benchtop drill press that runs too fast to really use the chuck capacity that it has (for drilling steel, at least), a Little Machine Shop HiTorque mini mill (square dove-tailed column mill drill) with non-tilting column and 20TPI leadscrew conversions on both table axes, Rivett 8" Precision lathe (the 608, before they called it the 608)... back geared, power cross feed, adjustable automatic carriage stop, running it with a VFD for the variable speed... absolutely fantastic machine, I take any excuse I can to make chips with it. I also have a Sincere 8mm watchmaker's lathe, with tons of accessories (including a milling/grinding/gear cutting attachment)... it's also been a great little machine that I really enjoy using. One of my favorite non-machines in the shop is a Barska stereoscopic microscope, it's wonderful for doing really small work and removing splinters.

                    I haven't had the LMS mini mill very long yet, but I've used it a fair amount so far and I like it a lot. It's very capable for its size. So far my only complaint with it is the huge amount of backlash in the fine downfeed mechanism... it's not a problem at all during use, just a constant reminder of its Chinese-ness. I do wish I had ordered the power feed add-on with it when I bought it. That will probably be my next shop purchase.

                    Here some pics I have to hand. First, the mini mill... not the best angle to really see what it's like, but we all know them pretty well anyhow:


                    My baby, the Rivett 8" Precision:


                    The watchmaker's lathe... shown with the milling/grinding/gear cutting attachment set up:


                    I don't have any computer controls or digital readouts on anything. I might consider DRO for the little mill sometime in the future, though.
                    Max
                    http://joyofprecision.com/

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by darryl View Post
                      Larger lathe, Advance 8x18. Dc motor now, plus ultra- low rpm drive using a mobility scooter motor and gearbox- final drive using a V belt to a 13 inch diameter pulley on the spindle. Obviously, this is also a dc motor.
                      Darryl, how did you do the DC conversion? I used a DC treadmill motor for a lathe once and was not happy with the power at the higher speeds.
                      -Darren-

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                      • #12
                        'Darryl, how did you do the DC conversion?'

                        I used the original spindle pulley, then made a jackshaft to be direct driven by a treadmill motor. The idea was to somewhat isolate the motor from the lathe bed for lower vibration. I wasn't happy with that, partially because the jackshaft was too long and gave rise to vibrations on its own, and partly because there wasn't enough power. Then I cut the jackshaft short and added another reduction of about 1.3 to 1 to the motor, which is now mounted off the lathe completely- although both share the bench for their mountings. The scooter motor is also mounted on the bench. I don't keep the 13 inch pulley mounted- I only attach it if I need the ultra low speed. For the most part, I keep the original drive belt on the highest reduction, which is the largest pulley on the spindle and the smallest on the jackshaft.

                        A rough calculation shows that I'm about 7 to 1 from the motor to the spindle, so I'd have to run the motor at 7000 rpm to get 1000 at the spindle. My power supply is capable of about 100 volts dc at the highest, so the end result is I get about 950 or so rpm on the spindle tops. For the most part I run slower than that. If I do want a higher speed, I change the original belt to the next step on the pulley. I almost never do that.

                        The dc is derived from a transformer with multiple taps, feeding through a bridge rectifier and with a good sized capacitor added. This much is home built, including winding the transformer and making the multi-position switch. There is an output switch which is the reversing switch also. I had to make a swing-away stop so I wouldn't go into reverse every time I stopped the motor.
                        I seldom do anything within the scope of logical reason and calculated cost/benefit, etc- I'm following my passion-

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          I have two 9" South Bend lathes...one with 48" bed and one with 54" bed, both with QC, an old 9" (?) Atlas with 42" bed that needs a lot of work to get running and some unknown brand that has a bed reminiscent of a SB in the ways but it's very lightweight, it has an 8' bed but three people can pick it up (barely). Got it cheap and it has a 2 1/2" through hole in the spindle; previous owner was going to use it as a wood lathe. I'm also part owner in a big old 20" Sebastian lathe with 8' bed and for mills I have a BP clone with a 9" by 49" table.
                          Location: Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada

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                          • #14
                            Speaking of wood...

                            Along with the metal working machinery I occasionally work on wood. I have a floor standing drill press with 17 inch swing with a spindle with enough travel to drill a 4 - 1/2 inch long pen blank. To go along with that is a Delta midi-lathe (10 inch swing, 16 inch between centers) for making pens and otherwise playing with wood.

                            Dan
                            At the end of the project, there is a profound difference between spare parts and extra parts.

                            Location: SF East Bay.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              I started off with an HF mini-mill and a MicroMark (same as an HF model, but 14" instead of 10" or 12") lathe.


                              Then I upgraded the lathe to a Grizzly G0609


                              That's the same benchtop.
                              The tax return after the lathe, I updated the mill to a Grizzly G0704, which can almost fit the entire mini machine into, with the mini at its minimum and Grizzly at its max.
                              Plus it came with its own stand, which was sorely needed at that point.
                              Last edited by Deus Machina; 02-09-2015, 01:34 AM.

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