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Rotary table from India

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  • Rotary table from India

    Anybody took their chance with one of these:

    http://www.ebay.com/itm/Rotary-Table...item35c45c1abb

    ???

    it would cover most of the work I plan to do - like hexagonal heads and such - but the price seems to be too good to be true.

  • #2
    Keep in mind the space on rotary tables gets taken up fast. Chucks and such either use it up or make them bigger.
    FWIW, I have never gotten Indian-made tooling that even approaches acceptable. I'd rather buy from China. My luck hasn't been bad there, and they appear to at least make an attempt at something that may be useable.

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    • #3
      Thank you, I am going back and forth on rotary table for quite a while now

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      • #4
        Some smaller Rotab's dont have any kind of taper in the centre which IMHO restricts their usefulness, some time ago I was looking at this one which looks remarkably similar and has no taper in the centre, didn't buy it due to that.

        Paul

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        • #5
          Yes, taper in the center seems to be one of the most important features.

          What I need is - I think -

          - Center taper
          - Horizontal/Vertical
          - Precise scale around
          - chuck 3 jaws

          - Dividing plates I could do without, right?
          Last edited by Prokop; 02-24-2015, 08:40 AM.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Deus Machina View Post
            FWIW, I have never gotten Indian-made tooling that even approaches acceptable. I'd rather buy from China.
            The main reason tooling is made in India is so that the Chinese don't feel so bad about the crap they sell.
            The shortest distance between two points is a circle of infinite diameter.

            Bluewater Model Engineering Society at https://sites.google.com/site/bluewatermes/

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            • #7
              I couldn't say it better than it was said in #4 and #6 posts.

              If Chinese tools range unpredictably from mediocre (to be polite) to very bad, the Indian ones are very consistent in quality.

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              • #8
                A 6" R/T is tiny, what machine are you putting a 4" one on? Horrible Freight used to carry the 4" R/T, search and you see it didn't exactly get rave reviews. As one member often posts regarding bargain tools, essentially, "Buy a good one and cry only once."

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                • #9
                  I have been happy with the Groz brand from India. I have dozens of items ranging from adaptors and arbors to milling vises and I thought they are pretty decent quality and fairly economically priced.

                  With that being said... I bought them all locally, from Busy-Bee and inspected all the items before I bought them.

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                  • #10
                    it would cover most of the work I plan to do - like hexagonal heads and such - but the price seems to be too good to be true.
                    If it is suitable for the work you do and the price is attractive I see no reason to hesitate.

                    I find, generally speaking, that low priced tools and appliances give satisfaction in home shop and hobby use provided one is careful to never ever stress them near the expected limits.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Prokop View Post
                      Yes, taper in the center seems to be one of the most important features.

                      What I need is - I think -

                      - Center taper
                      - Horizontal/Vertical
                      - Precise scale around
                      - chuck 3 jaws

                      - Dividing plates I could do without, right?
                      Don't forget backlash adjustment.

                      I buy a lot of Chinese tooling direct from China or via Hong Kong. Quality 90% of the time ranges from adequate to extremely good. It seems clear to me that Chinese brand manufacturers are starting to make a real effort. No name Chinese tooling with you local dealer brand on it is were the big risk remains, and no name tooling that even your local distributor is not prepared to put his name on are the bottom of the barrel. It is possibly the same with India made tooling, but my impression is that they are 10 to 15 years behind the Chinese.

                      Phil

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                      • #12
                        If the 36:1 ratio isn't too coarse for your needs, and you can deal with the T slots being cut right through your degree marks on the edge of the table (lol), then it may be ok. Based on my experience with Chinese and Indian tooling, expect that the lash between the worm and worm wheel will vary as the table turns, so you have to find a balance between the tight spots and loose spots.

                        I considered this same table for some time, but it wouldn't do for the type of work required. I looked to the Sherline table instead, which is supposed to be really good, and eventually decided to build my own, based on a scaled down Troyke design. It's going to take a long time, but it'll be nicer than any miniature rotary table I could buy even if I wanted to spend the money. Plus, it'll keep me off the streets and out of trouble.

                        If you end up getting this Indian one, be sure to follow up with short and long term reviews, I'm sure the info would be much appreciated by others.
                        Max
                        http://joyofprecision.com/

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                        • #13
                          I have had two items from India. One was a mill vise and was so horrible it was unusable, at least for accurate work. Out of square on most surfaces. I also have a Groz bench shear, they don't sell them anymore as far as I can tell, it is usable, does the job but pretty rough. Some Indian made hand tool I have looked at didn't make it out of the store.
                          The shortest distance between two points is a circle of infinite diameter.

                          Bluewater Model Engineering Society at https://sites.google.com/site/bluewatermes/

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                          • #14
                            As Artful Bodger said it is usable, think of it as a project .

                            Like restoring a fleamarket find.

                            Like most items that people look at on Ebay or similar , the buyer gets what they pay for , quite often cheap does not mean high quality finish or high precision.

                            For some things like machining nuts for a project where the originals are no longer manufactured it would work. but for any precision parts I would check one out, if any were available at a tool supplier before purchase.

                            Michael

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                            • #15
                              You can often get a good name brand used on eBay for the same price or a little more. I have bought over 700 items for the shop that way. I have probably averaged about 25% of new cost, some things being a little more, maybe up to 50%, some things around 1 or 2%. If you dig a little you will find the same item at many different prices there.

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