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  • Painting my shop

    I want to paint my shop. For obvious reasons I don't think I should spray paint. Do any of you have experience with a power roller?
    Location: The Black Forest in Germany

    How to become a millionaire: Start out with 10 million and take up machining as a hobby!

  • #2
    I have... a lot. My unit is $500 Graco airless sprayer that takes 5 gallon paint buckets. Simple conversion to roller. Squeeze trigger and the paint flows to the inside of the roller and out though perforations to the wool. Works very well - I can paint an entire room without stopping. Makes for keeping a 'wet edge" easy, and the application is very even. Soooo good for ceilings.. no bending and rewetting the roller. Few if any drips.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by lakeside53 View Post
      I have... a lot. My unit is $500 Graco airless sprayer that takes 5 gallon paint buckets. Simple conversion to roller. Squeeze trigger and the paint flows to the inside of the roller and out though perforations to the wool. Works very well - I can paint an entire room without stopping. Makes for keeping a 'wet edge" easy, and the application is very even. Soooo good for ceilings.. no bending and rewetting the roller. Few if any drips.
      What roller attachment do you have? Is it a quick disconnect?
      Location: The Black Forest in Germany

      How to become a millionaire: Start out with 10 million and take up machining as a hobby!

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      • #4
        Inside or out, drywall, metal, and stuff?
        Andy

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        • #5
          I'd have to go look - not sure if I did or not. It has a screw on connection anyhow and doesn't take take more then a few seconds to undo. Like all airless sprayers, cleaning take a while though.

          Mine's like this : http://www.ebay.com/itm/like/271284516261

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          • #6
            drop cloths -- EVERYWHERE.

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            • #7
              Good product - but you will still need a brush to get good edges and into some corners where the roller won't/can't go.

              It is a truism that with a roller or a spray the paint is "painted on(to)" the job whereas paint applied with a brush is "painted in(to)" the job.

              But both methods are very effective.

              "Cutting into" as well as "feather edging" need a brush.
              Last edited by oldtiffie; 02-25-2015, 07:51 PM.

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              • #8
                The quality of the finished job is in large part (entirely?) due to the quality of the preparation and application.

                That's mainly/all "wrist, elbow and shoulder work - and that's from the floor its worse/harder from a ladder or plank.

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                • #9
                  Detailed how to painting a room..
                  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T9MAmWnOznI

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                  • #10
                    Let your wife paint it. Women love to come up with painting projects, I hate painting.
                    Jim

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                    • #11
                      Why just "let" her and so give her the option of refusal?

                      Be brave - just make her - and you be the overseer/supervisor.

                      Perhaps she will (still?) love you (and thank you) afterwards (you hope?).

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                      • #12
                        The only experience I have with the powered "pump" roller system is with a US version, a Wagner.

                        Worst piece of crap I have had the displeasure of using. I *gave* the entire (not cheap) thing away. It was that bad, IMO, I couldn't take money for it.

                        The thing was "made of drips".... if it wasn't dripping, it was too dry to put on a coat. I can roller paint very well, but not with that POS.


                        Given that your shop is big, and high, do you really want to paint the whole thing with a roller? As Tiffie pointed out, you will still be up on a ladder etc doing the corners and edges.

                        The search has been trying to find the post with picture of your shop for 15 minutes now, no luck. But as I recall it doesn't look so bad as it is.
                        Last edited by J Tiers; 02-26-2015, 01:04 AM.
                        1601

                        Keep eye on ball.
                        Hashim Khan

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                        • #13
                          Ive got one of the earlex pumped roller systems that run off batteries, and for all that its ok albeit a bit prone to dripping when doing overhead and a pain to clean properly afterwards. Its certainly quicker than stopping to dip the roller in a tray once its going anyway and with a long handle it saves all that ladder business apart from edging in.
                          But my workshop is stone walls and irregular surfaces, its not like a finished plaster wall in the house, and I found rollering left it too thin anyway, so I just slopped it on with a assortment of large and small brushes in the end as the end game was just white walls for better reflection of light rather than looking pretty.

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                          • #14
                            Why not just face up to it - its not worth the effort and trouble.

                            Get in a good "Pro" (Contract) painters team.

                            They will eat that job.

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                            • #15
                              OK, am I the only one shocked and disappointed by this thread?
                              I expected a picture of young "horse riders" in his shop painting.

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