Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

3-D printed jet engine

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • 3-D printed jet engine

    I thought that this topic in the Australian media today may be of interest to some who are interested in 3-D printing.

    Sorry about the additional "local" stuff (Australia) but I could not eliminate it.

    http://www.abc.net.au/news/2015-02-2...engine/6262462

  • #2
    Interesting,I don't see why not,afterall if laser sintering is good enough to produce a fully functional pistol from stainless and inconel there isn't much reason not to use it for an engine prototype.

    http://youtu.be/u7ZYKMBDm4M
    I just need one more tool,just one!

    Comment


    • #3
      That's not "quite" your table-top "3D printing"..... It's one of the higher-tech versions.

      I suppose though, it is enough to get the media foaming at the mouth about people manufacturing weapons, drones, jet engines, or whatever on their kitchen tables..... Never thinking about the fact that just making the titanium powder (or other metal powder) is a high enough tech process that it is not a common material easily sourced and used by potential malefactors. After that, the laser plus control system etc, is not exactly cheap table-top stuff either. It's a fairly big step from the cheap plastic printing stuff.

      I know a few folks who do have laser CNC cutters that they built, but their stuff cannot do that.
      1601

      Keep eye on ball.
      Hashim Khan

      Comment


      • #4
        Maybe those (thieving?) buggers in OZ stole it from the Chinese.

        It was good timing though with the world's attention on the Australian International Air Show this week.

        http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Austral...tional_Airshow

        https://www.google.com.au/?gws_rd=ss...tralia&spell=1

        And not a Chinese machine (or any type of) tool to be seen.

        Odd/shame that.

        Comment


        • #5
          Interesting article, but there has to be quite a bit more to the manufacturing process than simply running parts through an RP machine, balancing for one.

          JMO, but the article sounds a bit too much like a sales ad bc of all the name-dropping. It reminds me of many of the folks I see weekly, somebody cold-calls and gets an engineer thats semi-open-minded and in need of a coffee break, they make a presentation and suddenly their website has our logo on it with fancy words like "collaboration." In reality I listened to a sales schpiel and have no further interest. OTOH I do give the folks in the article credit for suggesting RP is so much faster than traditional manufacturing methods, when someone makes so bold of a lie I do have to respect their gall (assuming Oz'z manufacturing sector doesnt have ridiculous lead times that is).
          "I am, and ever will be, a white-socks, pocket-protector, nerdy engineer -- born under the second law of thermodynamics, steeped in the steam tables, in love with free-body diagrams, transformed by Laplace, and propelled by compressible flow."

          Comment


          • #6
            Having built a few gas turbines I would like to see one running before I get too excited. Making parts is one thing, a running engine is another.

            Regards
            Steve.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by justanengineer View Post
              Interesting article, but there has to be quite a bit more to the manufacturing process than simply running parts through an RP machine, balancing for one.
              This.

              Did you notice the slide sticking on it's way back between shots?

              Comment


              • #8
                What I never see in these presentations is if there is a need for secondary machining of the parts and what loss there is of the powder used in the sintering process.

                The engine and M1911 are very interesting, but are the parts removed from the printer and directly assembled into a functional unit? The fancy balls being printed and removed from the powder leave a mass of unfused material, it it reusable as is or does it require treatment prior to reuse if reuse is possible at all.

                It is very interesting, but has quite a way to go before it can do all that is intimated in the press releases.
                Jim H.

                Comment


                • #9
                  What I never see in these presentations is if there is a need for secondary machining of the parts and what loss there is of the powder used in the sintering process.

                  The engine and M1911 are very interesting, but are the parts removed from the printer and directly assembled into a functional unit?

                  Currently they can.
                  There is a deposition process that was patented by an MIT professor that deposits a vitreous metal-ceramic material that is extremely strong. They've made crecsent wrenches that they can take out of the machine and use.
                  I would say that there is a long way to go, but the improvement steps keep getting closer and closer together.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    The article is misleading, the technology is not a new "breakthrough" as well as there are some other questionable comments.
                    I assisted in the installation of the first metal 3d printer in Canada 4 years ago at RIM in Waterloo (right across the road from Raytheon coincidentally).
                    It also used a laser to sinter the metal in the print head.
                    They were using it for prototyping their new BB10 tablet and phone cases at the time (before they were released).
                    Cheers,
                    Jon

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by JCHannum View Post
                      What I never see in these presentations is if there is a need for secondary machining of the parts and what loss there is of the powder used in the sintering process.

                      The engine and M1911 are very interesting, but are the parts removed from the printer and directly assembled into a functional unit?
                      Even if there is some secondary machining to do the big advantage is in the internal shape of the compressor and turbine blades. The fact that a blade could be made with the minimum internal structure instead of a solid would greatly reduce the weight of the engine. Cooling holes could be made more intricate and turbine blades may be able to be made out of materials (ceramics) that are hard to make with current technology.
                      The shortest distance between two points is a circle of infinite diameter.

                      Bluewater Model Engineering Society at https://sites.google.com/site/bluewatermes/

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Jon Heron View Post
                        The article is misleading, the technology is not a new "breakthrough" as well as there are some other questionable comments.
                        I assisted in the installation of the first metal 3d printer in Canada 4 years ago at RIM in Waterloo (right across the road from Raytheon coincidentally).
                        It also used a laser to sinter the metal in the print head.
                        They were using it for prototyping their new BB10 tablet and phone cases at the time (before they were released).
                        Cheers,
                        Jon
                        Where they quoting new technology or a new type of materials that could be used with this tech. to make engine parts in a way that hasn't been done before.
                        The shortest distance between two points is a circle of infinite diameter.

                        Bluewater Model Engineering Society at https://sites.google.com/site/bluewatermes/

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          It seems to be promoting the 3d printer technology as the breakthrough, I see no mention of a new material?
                          The breakthrough opens the door for engineers to make and test parts in days instead of months.

                          "[In the past you had to] melt, mould, carve and turn to get the final product," said Professor Ian Smith, Monash University's vice-provost for research.

                          "This way we can very quickly get a final product, so the advantages of this technology are, firstly, for rapid prototyping and making a large number of prototypes quickly.
                          This technology has a very long way to go before they can start to spit out production aircraft parts, but for prototyping 3d printing has been the breakthrough technology for, it must be 10 years by now, no?
                          Cheers,
                          Jon

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Speaking of 3d printing, check out this innovation!
                            http://3dprint.com/47065/argentinian-3d-metal-printer/
                            Cheers,
                            Jon

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              I wonder if the reception the item got in the USA had a fair bit of negativity in it.

                              Would it have got a better reception if the process report was made in the USA instead of "off-shore"?

                              Sour grapes?

                              https://www.google.com.au/?gws_rd=ssl#q=sour+grapes
                              Last edited by oldtiffie; 02-26-2015, 09:16 PM.

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X