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Expanding mandrels.. Handy?

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  • Expanding mandrels.. Handy?

    I have a local with a like new set of K.O. Lee expanding mandrel set, 5 piece I believe, for 300.00 does anyone have any input on how handy these tools are?

  • #2
    I have these sets here, the second set down the page.

    http://www.arceurotrade.co.uk/Catalo...nding-Mandrels

    Luckily they were bought for me when I was setting my new shop up.
    Very good at what they do, but unless you can get the use out of them, they can be a bit of an expensive dust gatherer, like a lot of other tooling I had bought for me.

    John
    If you don't try it, you will never know if you can do it !!

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    • #3
      When you need them they're a lifesaver. It depends on the kind of work you do. The K.O.Lee ones will be good quality. The good ones are expensive, worth it only if they get used.

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      • #4
        Handy, yes!
        There are lots of workarounds but that's often expedient and hassle free, if you can choke the change.

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        • #5
          First I've seen of them.

          A really good product all round that really does fill a void.

          Expensive but would be great and probably well worth the cost if needed.

          I've bought a bit of stuff over time from arceurotrade (UK) and their costs may seem a bit high to some but all that I've received from them have been excellent and so far as I am concerned have been very good value.

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          • #6
            The first type in the link are great. I use them all the time for things which will not fit a standard drive-in mandrel.

            The second type might be, but I have never used any.
            1601

            Keep eye on ball.
            Hashim Khan

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            • #7
              I have a full set (about 8 pieces) . Very useful for machining pulleys, wheels etc... anything where grabbing the OD or ID in a chuck doesn't work, and/or work between centers.
              Last edited by lakeside53; 02-26-2015, 09:07 PM.

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              • #8
                They are good to have when nothing else will work, but were primarily made for use with grinders and will not take heavy cuts in the lathe. I have accumulated a fairly complete set up to 1-1/2" capacity and would not part with them though they only see occasional use.
                Jim H.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by JCHannum View Post
                  They are good to have when nothing else will work, but were primarily made for use with grinders and will not take heavy cuts in the lathe. I have accumulated a fairly complete set up to 1-1/2" capacity and would not part with them though they only see occasional use.
                  I agree, they were designed for use with grinders where a minimum amount of force is applied to the part. They are just a wedge fit. Not really enough holding force for lathe work. I've seen many of them slip and score up the tapered shaft.

                  JL................

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                  • #10
                    I have a set and really like them. Out of curiosity, what is the proper way to "seat" them. You know, lock the part in place. Im sure I have been doing it wrong (but still works) so I wont divulge that info JR
                    My old yahoo group. Bridgeport Mill Group

                    https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/...port_mill/info

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                    • #11
                      I think there is only one way to seat them. Place the part over the expanding sleeve and tap it home.

                      JL...........

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                      • #12
                        I make sure mine are dry (no lube). Mount the part to be turned, tap firmly with a hammer. Done.

                        I turned 2.26 x6 2 inch aluminum wheels on them from SQUARE stock - never had any slip...

                        This is using the 1.5 inch set:




                        A poly-vee pulley using the 1 inch set.



                        Here's how I drive them (shop made) - the a series of adapters inside the center section to adapter the different od's.





                        They are flexible so it's easy to get them to "sing" (chatter) though. Try to keep them as short as possible, and fiddle with speed and feed.
                        Last edited by lakeside53; 02-26-2015, 11:26 PM.

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                        • #13
                          Arbor press...... For seating them as well as tapered mandrels, and also for removing them.
                          1601

                          Keep eye on ball.
                          Hashim Khan

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                          • #14
                            I thought I read somewhere that an arbor press was used. I have just been using gravity. Mount sleeve and part on spindle and "drop" or tap with force the end of the spindle on a wood or white plastic cutting board. Keep tapping downward till its firmly seated. Never had one slip. Thats if the part is heavy enough. If its light or a thin walled part, say some tubing I will use a scrap piece of round metal (many sizes in my garage) that catches the tubing but slides over the sleeve and kinda tap it tight. JR
                            My old yahoo group. Bridgeport Mill Group

                            https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/...port_mill/info

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                            • #15
                              If your mounting thin wall tube on the expanding mandrel too much force can expand or stretch the part.

                              JL.................

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