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  • John Buffum
    replied
    How I got the Marantz turntable.

    In 1988, CDs had not yet come to dominate the music scene. You still bought LPs from Columbia House, BMG, and your local store. Marantz turntables were arguably the best on the market. Radio stations used a different brand, but among consumers, Marantz was king. In 1988 money, you could pay over $500 for one. Today's money? Eeeeyow!

    Fort Leavenworth has a yard sale every Spring. I was poking around, and saw this Marantz turntable. Direct drive. Direct drive was considered superior. But this unit was only $2.00. The plastic lid was cracked, and the tone arm mount was broken in two. The tone arm mount was some unknown plastic. I went to Gronis' Hardware, and bought a tube of glue reputed to be able to fix it. It has held up fine for almost 30 years. The sockets for the two points the tone arm rode on were worn. I replaced them with fresh made from an aluminum nail. I had used my electric drill as a crude lathe. At Radio Shack, a cartridge with needle would run $26 to $255. I spent about $40. After 30 years, no problem.

    For about $50, a top of the line direct drive turntable. Saved from the dumpster. All parts were there, and otherwise in good shape.

    Just a stumble down memory lane.

    Leave a comment:


  • John Buffum
    replied
    Originally posted by loose nut View Post
    That's right, but the biggest contributing factor is you and a hot girl, sitting on a sofa with a bottle of wine, the lights turned low and evil on your mind. After that who gives a damn about the sound quality.
    You don't hafta be in your 20's for that! I was in my 50's.

    And I married the gal! Ten years ago! Najee, Alannah Miles, Miles Davis, Kenny G, after a good, modest meal. We were destined for the altar, but the ol' Sansui sealed the deal! That was when I still had the Polk 10's.

    Never underestimate the power of music!

    Leave a comment:


  • Toolguy
    replied
    Now we're dealing with reality! All the previous arguments are merely vaporous theory.

    Leave a comment:


  • loose nut
    replied
    Originally posted by garagemark View Post

    Oh and by the way, the biggest contributing factor to the true audio experience isn't the equipment.
    That's right, but the biggest contributing factor is you and a hot girl, sitting on a sofa with a bottle of wine, the lights turned low and evil on your mind. After that who gives a damn about the sound quality.

    Leave a comment:


  • loose nut
    replied
    Originally posted by oldtiffie View Post
    And what of those of us who do not have good let alone perfect hearing and are not in a perfect auditorium/room/surround?
    That's what beer is for.

    Leave a comment:


  • J Tiers
    replied
    Originally posted by oldtiffie View Post
    And what of those of us who do not have good let alone perfect hearing and are not in a perfect auditorium/room/surround?
    Oddly, imperfect hearing is often still able to easily distinguish live from recorded, and so can benefit from decent equipment.

    Of course, bad enough and it really becomes moot.....

    Leave a comment:


  • Seastar
    replied
    Originally posted by garagemark View Post
    Shame Tiffie. Those old tapes and discs are wildly coming back into favor. You may have had a e-bay gold mine.

    The new generation is buying up every old vinyl pressing machine they can lay their hands on. These kids are going to make a killing if they play their cards right. The link is one of hundreds documenting the resurgence of the snap, crackle and pop:

    http://www.nytimes.com/2013/06/10/ar...back.html?_r=0

    Who knew.
    Yep
    And a very good source for vinyl is your local Goodwill Store.
    I have "harvested" over 200 reasonable quality vintage vinys in the last year from my local two Goodwill Stores.
    Ignorant kids give away Mom and Dads records.
    Bill

    Leave a comment:


  • garagemark
    replied
    Shame Tiffie. Those old tapes and discs are wildly coming back into favor. You may have had a e-bay gold mine.

    The new generation is buying up every old vinyl pressing machine they can lay their hands on. These kids are going to make a killing if they play their cards right. The link is one of hundreds documenting the resurgence of the snap, crackle and pop:

    http://www.nytimes.com/2013/06/10/ar...back.html?_r=0

    Who knew.

    Leave a comment:


  • oldtiffie
    replied
    Don't think so Cameron.

    Its all in the TV.

    Tapes and disks were all binned quite a while ago - and not missed at all - other than a few we keep to play on the computer or TV recorder.

    Leave a comment:


  • cameron
    replied
    You'll just have to bin your audio stuff, oldtiffie.

    Leave a comment:


  • oldtiffie
    replied
    And what of those of us who do not have good let alone perfect hearing and are not in a perfect auditorium/room/surround?

    Leave a comment:


  • John Buffum
    replied
    Originally posted by garagemark View Post
    Oh and by the way, the biggest contributing factor to the true audio experience isn't the equipment. Oh no. It is by far the room acoustics. Lack of room treatment allows sound to bounce all over the place. Your ears can actually hear every note many times, which can make even the best equipment seem inferior. Simply plopping speakers on either side of a room of hardwood floors and drywall with a few pictures hanging around is ludicrous. The sonic wave must be absorbed peripherally so your brain doesn't get confused. But there is one caveat. The War Wagon will absolutely have something to say about you hanging sound absorbers all over her living room. It just ain’t gonna happen in my world! Fortunately, she gave me a dedicated listening/ drinking room. I win.
    I quite agree. A friend has a Dahlquist 10" subwoofer. He found the best place to put it was on the part of his living room floor that is ceramic tile. When it was on carpet, it absorbed a lot. In addition, he has the Dahlquist speakers. The mount angle is critical. Five degrees of tilt gives wondrously good sound. Straight up loses "something". We don't know what it is, but it is there.

    I think whoever invented Feng Shui was a stereo installer. Movement of a few inches, though generating terrible inconvenience in a room, has very noticeable effect on sound and sound quality.

    I'm quite happy with my Best Buy Polk 5" x 14" speakers. I didn't spend $8,000, like my neighbor. Sound is enjoyable. We don't blast, anymore, and have no subwoofer. The one area he did better with his $8,000 was the FM receiver. Mine, in my 1974 Sansui 8 Deluxe, is WAY less than optimal. A station my car brings in clearly, I just barely receive with the 8. But, with CD's and vinyl, I can live with that.

    Leave a comment:


  • dockterj
    replied
    ha! that was too funny. I demagnetized my speakers just like they said. The noise floor dropped so low that I couldn't measure it but my dynamic range is now 0.

    Leave a comment:


  • kendall
    replied
    And now you have people paying $750 for used albums purchased from thrift stores...

    https://www.yahoo.com/makers/why-thi...730604250.html

    Leave a comment:


  • garagemark
    replied
    Originally posted by loose nut View Post
    I don't care how expensive a turntable and sound system you have, if you play a CD on a record player it sounds like crap.
    Now that's just funny. Thank you for my daily laugh.

    I have, for me, what I consider to be a decent stereo setup (Denon PRE 1100 preamp, Denon PRA 2400 power amp, Infinity Kappa 7 speakers, Technics SL1200 turntable w/ Shure R1000 EDT cart., Sony five disc CD changer, and several tape decks). All early 80's vintage, sans the CD deck. I learned long ago that there is a point where the debate of "best" is almost nothing more than opinion. To a point, money can buy audio happiness. After that point, money buys bragging rights. I believe I landed in the happiness category; I am satisfied with what I have.

    By the same token, there are many folks out there that would be satisfied with a transistor radio from the fifties. And some of those people see anything more as just plain idiocy. So the way I see it, it works like this: An "audiophile" will never convince a non audiophile that more is better. And a non audiophile will never convince and audiophile that he's crazy for spending the money. That is why so many hobbies exist. It's all about passion. No one is wrong or right. Hobby interests are just different, and the attainable level of any hobby is directly proportional to the size of the wallet.

    The CD versus turntable wars is an ongoing saga playing out mostly within the audio enthusiast world. It, too will never end. We all have our opinions. I prefer vinyl over compact disc most times because the tone simply feels warmer to me. I can take two identical soft sound recordings, and on the analog record I can hear the singer taking breaths between lines, whereas on the CD, much of that "data" appears to be missing. I have done this experiment many times. However, since new recordings are recorded differently anyway, then CD, MP3, or whatever comes next is of no real consequence. It was recorded in digital, so you may as well play it back with digital.

    Oh and by the way, the biggest contributing factor to the true audio experience isn't the equipment. Oh no. It is by far the room acoustics. Lack of room treatment allows sound to bounce all over the place. Your ears can actually hear every note many times, which can make even the best equipment seem inferior. Simply plopping speakers on either side of a room of hardwood floors and drywall with a few pictures hanging around is ludicrous. The sonic wave must be absorbed peripherally so your brain doesn't get confused. But there is one caveat. The War Wagon will absolutely have something to say about you hanging sound absorbers all over her living room. It just ain’t gonna happen in my world! Fortunately, she gave me a dedicated listening/ drinking room. I win.

    Leave a comment:

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