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  • Weston Bye
    replied
    I'm given to understand that there will be no nausea - but diarrhea is a definite possibility.

    Tiffie, I take your experience as encouragement, but even if things don't work as planned, I expect at least another serviceable 10 years or so.

    Leave a comment:


  • oldtiffie
    replied
    Well done Weston for persevering with the program.

    It does seem a bit long-ish compared to mine (Mom>Fri x 7 weeks - 35) in which the bed the bed my prostate laid in plus the surrounding tissue and lymph glands were radiated as my cancer had been very aggressive and I guess the post-op pathology report on the removed tissue was not as good as might have been hoped for or perhaps the Urologist and Radiation Oncologist were being very cautious/conservative as my cancer returned after the prostate was removed (about 4 years after as I recall).

    But it worked reasonably well as the radiation therapy reduced my PSA to 1.0ppm - so it was still there but as it increased again later it was a good basis for my hormone therapy which seems to be working quite well.

    I've had 10 years so far after my prostate was removed and despite some of the side and after effects of hormone therapy I am going very well. My Urologist has assured my wife and I that we have a good number of good years before us yet.

    So,using my case as a reference you have many good years left yet.

    Leave a comment:


  • Carm
    replied
    Mr.Bye
    The tattoos will disappear, according to my wife- I never saw them anyway.
    You haven't mentioned nausea and I hope there is no need, but ginger can help. No, not Ginger, but the root or permutations thereof. It may prevent taking one drug to counteract another that you take because another ad nausea...

    Leave a comment:


  • Weston Bye
    replied
    Session 10 Update

    Nothing remarkable just the round number 10. Increasing fatigue and beginnings of bowel habit changes, not for the better. Comes with the program...

    Radiation techs remarked today that I have a long program - longer than most others. They said that the next stage in a couple of weeks is even longer.

    My reading of the literature they gave me is that they are doing full pelvis first and then they do only the prostate bed.

    I will be well and truly cooked by the end of this.

    Leave a comment:


  • oldtiffie
    replied
    If all else fails when "it" don't werk enny maw there might be hope yet:

    http://www.abc.net.au/news/2015-03-1...isions/6318478

    Leave a comment:


  • fjk
    replied
    Originally posted by Weston Bye View Post
    Anybody have any ideas?
    If you can see this dot
    You're too close

    ?

    Leave a comment:


  • oldtiffie
    replied
    Many of us who had time in the Navy will recall ("others" of course - never "us") chasing or hoping for some luck and finding some "tatty old bit" (for what ever purpose).

    As a tattoo is a "tat" would tatty Old bit have been tattoo-ed and if she had it for radiation therapy I suspect that some who "got lucky" (with "her"??) might have cause for concern.

    http://www.theauthenticperishers.co....menu/tatty.htm

    https://www.google.com.au/?gws_rd=ss...sailors+friend

    But at least our families knew we were (are??) "pure" - and all thanks to Hormone therapy (with or without tattoo embellishment).

    Leave a comment:


  • oldtiffie
    replied
    Some would say that as many who have had their prostate removed and have had or are on hormone therapy as a result it and who have "man boobs", cannot get or hold an erection or ejaculate, have little or no libido and who have an increase in women's hormones - hot flushes too??!! - and lack "drive" are no longer "real men" and are more toward the female than the male are thereby not "men" at all and don't need tattoos like "real men" do.

    If all or most of that is the case then there is no need to get a "male" tattoo because of hormone therapy.

    But don't forget your hand-bag and cosmetics (and use them).

    Is getting such a tattoo a "bit tatty"?

    https://www.google.com.au/?gws_rd=ssl#q=tatty

    https://www.google.com.au/?gws_rd=ssl#q=tatty

    Leave a comment:


  • The Artful Bodger
    replied
    Weston, they told us at a patients information meeting that the womenfolk having tattoos on their breasts could have these later changed at hospital expense to a more decorative design, a butterfly for example. No one had any appropriate suggestion for what us men should have!

    Leave a comment:


  • Weston Bye
    replied
    Day 5, uneventful.

    As has been mentioned, tattoos are a part of the process. No big deal.

    However, in an effort to find some humorous relief, I am contemplating having my tats "embellished" at a tattoo parlor after the process is over. Probably never get to show them off, considering the location...

    Here is some idle doodling:

    Anybody have any ideas?

    Leave a comment:


  • oldtiffie
    replied
    Originally posted by fjk View Post
    Sigh. Sorry about having to become acquainted with a new machine ...

    I got to know your machine's brother a few years ago. (Or maybe cousin? Mine
    was a "Novalis"...). Anyway, they are pretty neat machines. They use linear
    accelerators to generate high-power X-rays. The head of the machine rotates
    around you, zapping the target from different angles. As it does, they change
    the shape of the beam so that it conforms (to within something like 0.1mm)
    to the shape of the target as seen from that angle. The notion is that the cumulative
    dose of x-rays is high enough to do real damage only where the multiple beams
    cross --- which should be just the target. They also took imaging x-rays before and
    after each session to see _exactly_ where I, and Spanky-the-tumor, were on the
    table, and aligned the high-power beam accordingly (think of it as edge-finding :-).
    A lot of serious computing power and precision mechanical widgetry in the machine!

    Since then, Spanky hasn't shown any additional signs of life in my yearly MRIs, so I
    guess I'm a happy customer.

    Good Luck
    Frank
    That is an excellent description of the radiation therapy process Frank.

    Many thanks.

    I should make a couple of points regarding MRI's and CT's etc. as I understood my Radiation Oncologist who made sure that my wife and I understood all that we needed to know about those radiation processes as well as apart from the radiation therapy but used in conjunction with it. We used to see him at 5 monthly intervals (he retired last Christmas) as we do with the Urologist.

    We see our General Practitioner - aka GP and local Doctor 2-weekly.

    All are really excellent in all ways and we are as well as we are because of them.

    But back to the Radiation Oncologist and MRI's and CT's etc.

    First of al he said that the PSA is the average rate of prostate cancer - both before and after the removal of the Prostate - and that PSA post operation is the normal way of assessing the level of cancer and its rate of progression (increase) and regression (loss).

    Next, the cancer is a "soft tissue" item and the smallest (normally) size of an individual cancer that they/it can detect is about 2 to 3 mm (say 0.08" to 0.12"). It will not normally detect anything less so there could (will?) be a lot of cancer floating/being around that they may/will miss "seeing".

    PSA will pick up the sum total of cancer that is not less (i.e. under) than 0.01PPM (parts per million) and that it is more the rate of change rather that the "steady state" of PSA that is of concern.

    If the PSA is "flat lining" it is of a lot less risk that an PSA that is rising quickly.

    When I was doing my daily radiation therapy (daily for 7 weeks - 5 x 7 = 35 times) the technicians/Radiologist took several x-rays and sent them to the Oncologist every Tuesday for our (wife and I) weekly appointment with him for assessment and discussion with us.

    After about 2 weeks my radiation therapy my PSA was reduced to 0.01ppm - so we knew it was there as it was at or more than the 0.01ppm "floor" that the PSA test could detect.

    It started to rise - slowly but accelerating - after the radiation therapy and I commenced the hormone therapy which is going very well.

    There was no cancer showing in my bones/skeleton with the "Bone scan" x-rays.

    I'd rather I didn't have cancer but I did and still do and will have it for the rest of my life.

    Every one - Doctors and my wife and I - are happy as we can be in the circumstances - and we are very much relieved and getting on with our lives very well.

    My wife and I will adjust if and as necessary as we go along.

    The radiation beam was aimed at the pocket that the prostate and its surrounds were removed from - so it was "localised" - my prostate and its adjacent lymph node glands were removed.
    Last edited by oldtiffie; 03-12-2015, 08:24 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • Georgineer
    replied
    Originally posted by Weston Bye View Post

    ...The most noticeable side effects are hot flashes ...
    A lady friend of mine is adamant that it is not a hot flush but a power surge.

    George

    Leave a comment:


  • fjk
    replied
    Sigh. Sorry about having to become acquainted with a new machine ...

    I got to know your machine's brother a few years ago. (Or maybe cousin? Mine
    was a "Novalis"...). Anyway, they are pretty neat machines. They use linear
    accelerators to generate high-power X-rays. The head of the machine rotates
    around you, zapping the target from different angles. As it does, they change
    the shape of the beam so that it conforms (to within something like 0.1mm)
    to the shape of the target as seen from that angle. The notion is that the cumulative
    dose of x-rays is high enough to do real damage only where the multiple beams
    cross --- which should be just the target. They also took imaging x-rays before and
    after each session to see _exactly_ where I, and Spanky-the-tumor, were on the
    table, and aligned the high-power beam accordingly (think of it as edge-finding :-).
    A lot of serious computing power and precision mechanical widgetry in the machine!

    Since then, Spanky hasn't shown any additional signs of life in my yearly MRIs, so I
    guess I'm a happy customer.

    Good Luck
    Frank

    Leave a comment:


  • oldtiffie
    replied
    See my post at the "other" thread:

    http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net/thr...522#post972522

    Leave a comment:


  • oldtiffie
    replied
    Sorry Weston - will comply.

    Leave a comment:

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