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Increased demand for welders: community colleges respond (NYTimes)

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  • Increased demand for welders: community colleges respond (NYTimes)

    http://www.nytimes.com/2015/03/11/bu...r-classes.html

    As Demand for Welders Resurges, Community Colleges Offer Classes


    <quote>
    ...

    In recent decades, welding — like a litany of other blue-collar trades that once provided high-school graduates with a reliable route to the middle class — seemed to have about as promising a future as rotary phones. But many of these once-faltering occupations are finding new life in Texas and the Gulf Coast region, where an industrial revival built around the energy boom continues to spawn petrochemical plants and miles of new pipeline despite the plunge in crude oil prices.

    “I’ve never seen anything like it,” said Jim Hanna, a 33-year industry veteran who is now senior director of human resources at the Fluor Corporation, an engineering and construction company that is building petrochemical plants in the area for Dow Chemical, Chevron Phillips Chemical and Sasol. “For a long time, parents didn’t want their son or daughter to become a pipe fitter or welder, but now, the demand for noncollege graduates with vocational skills is huge.”

    ...
    <end quote>

  • #2
    Other news: law-school applications have dropped 24% over the last three years:


    http://dealbook.nytimes.com/2014/12/...nts-increases/

    "...
    The number of first-year law school students fell 11 percent in fall 2013 from fall 2012, part of a striking 24 percent decline in just three years, according to the American Bar Association. The incoming class in 2013 stood at 39,675 students, the smallest first-year class since the 1970s, when law school enrollment began to rise substantially. About two-thirds, or 135, of the association’s accredited law schools, registered a drop in first-year enrollment that year — and little has changed this fall."

    Comment


    • #3
      Just because you are a lawyer or have a degree in "something" doesn't mean you will make a living at it.

      On the other hand I made a very (accent on very) good living as a welder.
      The shortest distance between two points is a circle of infinite diameter.

      Bluewater Model Engineering Society at https://sites.google.com/site/bluewatermes/

      Southwestern Ontario. Canada

      Comment


      • #4
        "As Demand for Welders Resurges, Community Colleges Offer Classes.... miles of new pipeline...."

        Good luck with 798

        Comment


        • #5
          Too bad over the years high schools have been doing away with their shop classes.

          Comment


          • #6
            these once-faltering occupations are finding new life in Texas and the Gulf Coast region, where an industrial revival built around the energy boom continues to spawn petrochemical plants and miles of new pipeline despite the plunge in crude oil prices.
            And therein lies the problem. The fracking bubble will eventually pop. What will happen to all the welders who get laid off?

            Welding is linked to construction, and construction is boom or bust. Construction also requires living on the road and working with rough characters. It often involves heavy lifting, crawling on your knees, etc.. In other words, it's a young mans job.

            What will happen to those young welders when they get old, have a bad back, bad knees, and failing eyesight?

            Welding jobs are not in high demand in my area, nor do they pay much, either.

            I enjoy welding, but have poor eyesight and poor coordination, so I will never be a professional-quality welder. I've done my share of industrial construction and industrial maintenance, and it sucked -- strenuous, dirty, dangerous work, lots of traveling required, with no job security.

            If you have a natural talent for welding, and can make a steady living at it, fine.

            It's not that I'm discouraging anyone from pursuing a skilled trade, if they are so inclined, it's just that being a skilled tradesman no longer ensures that you'll make a living wage or have steady employment.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Carm View Post
              "As Demand for Welders Resurges, Community Colleges Offer Classes.... miles of new pipeline...."

              Good luck with 798
              I could goggle it, but what's 798?

              If the gas boom in Dakota wasn't projected to be long term, HomDee wouldn't have built two new stores up there. The first two new stores in the US in a long time.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by MTNGUN View Post
                The fracking bubble will eventually pop.
                Eventually? Your post date is only an hour ago, I checked to make sure this isn't some 5 year old thread. First bankruptcies, of many, have already begun, etc. Its basically at peak a little while ago. Note that there's jobs for awhile after a bubble peak is reached and the pop has begun, its not like every welder is already unemployed or will be any time soon.

                Here's a link to a story with the first 8 bankruptcies in Houston TX, so far.

                http://www.reuters.com/article/2015/...0UN2MA20150108

                I always wanted to learn to weld for my own skill purposes, and there's probably going to be plenty of space at the local tech school classrooms soon enough.

                Last time we discussed welding here, I found its hard to find jobs online around where I live above the level of entry car-x muffler dude around minimum wage, although decent paying jobs do exist with considerable searching.

                Comment


                • #9
                  What will happen to all the welders who get laid off?
                  Not in the industry but sort of expected it with the drop in crude prices but it still surprised me based solely on how the ads on Kijiji in Alberta (and to a less degree in Saskatchewan) have changed since say November 2014.
                  Even weldors with years of experience and multiple tickets are scrambling, pages and pages of apprentices/fitters/helpers already in province looking...not sure what those from outside of province hoping to travel and gain work are thinking will happen...lots of equipment just sitting including nearly new welding rigs...I mean good workers with skills will always have something but the glut is gone for the most part.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Rosco-P View Post
                    I could goggle it, but what's 798?
                    http://www.local798.org/

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      It's a shame welding courses aren't combined with something else, machining or cad, something like that, putting all your eggs in one basket is never good.
                      Mark

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by J.Ramsey View Post
                        Wouldn't have guess it was a union local, thought it might be the number of a proposed new pipeline.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Just read an article that stated an 80 year high in crude stockpiled in the U.S. They are running out of places to put it so that would make me think fracking & the oil coast would be slowing down. I'll find the article & post a link.

                          Different link but almost same info http://www.wsj.com/articles/oil-glut...all-1425577673

                          Still not it but close http://www.econmatters.com/2015/02/u...r-80-year.html
                          Last edited by flylo; 03-10-2015, 03:59 PM.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            "Wouldn't have guess it was a union local....."

                            At one time (in other words, maybe things have changed) 798 had jurisdiction over any interstate laid in the U.S., which includes Alaska of course.
                            I know many U.A. locals around the country who can't stand 'em.

                            The likelihood of one of the trainees in the OP getting pipeline work is the same as Al Sharpton waiting tables at a Klan rally.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by tlfamm View Post
                              Other news: law-school applications have dropped 24% over the last three years:


                              http://dealbook.nytimes.com/2014/12/...nts-increases/

                              "...
                              The number of first-year law school students fell 11 percent in fall 2013 from fall 2012, part of a striking 24 percent decline in just three years, according to the American Bar Association. The incoming class in 2013 stood at 39,675 students, the smallest first-year class since the 1970s, when law school enrollment began to rise substantially. About two-thirds, or 135, of the association’s accredited law schools, registered a drop in first-year enrollment that year — and little has changed this fall."
                              Now that's positive news!

                              Comment

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