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  • My craigslist cnc score

    Not sure what im gonna do with it. Its missing the spindle but if I keep it together I could come up with something. Seems like its fairly old based on the cables etc.

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  • #2
    I really bought it for the steppers and linear rails. I would like to build a stepper powered dividing head and a drill sharpening rig with the rails. After looking it over I kinda hate to tear it apart. Its not a real heavily built unit but at the same time its not a home built pos either. The entire frame is all aluminum and seems pretty descent.

    I guess it may come down to the electronics and if they can be reused. What do you all think. It was only 60.00 so im not losing anything buy tearing it apart if I decide to do so.

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    • #3
      I would say thats probably comparable to what they ebay as small light chinese diy milling machines now. Add a old pc with a real parallel port and hook it up and see what works.
      Then run linuxcnc or mach on the pc and your away. Might make a nice engraver setup with the right spindle in, or a wood router, or one of those cooking extruder heads for a cake decorator or a 3d printer or lots of other options. Worth a play in my book.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by MrFluffy View Post
        I would say thats probably comparable to what they ebay as small light chinese diy milling machines now. Add a old pc with a real parallel port and hook it up and see what works.
        Then run linuxcnc or mach on the pc and your away. Might make a nice engraver setup with the right spindle in, or a wood router, or one of those cooking extruder heads for a cake decorator or a 3d printer or lots of other options. Worth a play in my book.
        Yeah I think you are right.. I can always buy another stepper motor for the indexing head project. Heck it came with an extra I may just be able to use it for that project. I can always just grab one of those small roto zip cutters from Lowes and use it as a spindle in the beginning. I have needed something to make smaller plastic items I could reproduce by casting.. This might just be the ticket and would give me some experience 3d modeling and leaning about cnc.

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        • #5
          Maybe when the cat finishes reading the directions he can figure out what to do with it?

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Yondering View Post
            Maybe when the cat finishes reading the directions he can figure out what to do with it?
            I asked the little skank.. She said it was too complicated for me. Dumb cats.

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            • #7
              Sherline sells a 10000 rpm spindle that could be easily adapted to that, $380, motor and all.
              http://www.sherline.com/4335pg.htm
              Weston Bye - Author, The Mechatronist column, Digital Machinist magazine
              ~Practitioner of the Electromechanical Arts~

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              • #8
                Cool... Is there a control box? I use Mach3 on my CNC router table. It's about $170 I think. My control box is made by Soigeneris STDR-4C... $850. It uses a Gecko G540 to power/control the stepper motors. A smart guy could probably build his own controller with the Gecko G540 and save some money. For tool path software I use Vectric VCarve Pro, which is about $6oo. It doesn't do much 3D though. You can buy ArtCAM Express for $150, it'll do a lot more 3D stuff. And there's likely 78 other ways to go...

                The router/spindle speed is pretty important to get good cuts and long tool life. But that's a whole different subject, and it's dinner time!

                Chris

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Weston Bye View Post
                  Sherline sells a 10000 rpm spindle that could be easily adapted to that, $380, motor and all.
                  http://www.sherline.com/4335pg.htm
                  Yeah that makes sense. The guy I got it from said he bought it for the sherline head and never used the rest for anything.

                  I'm prolly not leaning toward spending that much for a spindle. I intend on using it only for some light plastics and maybe wood. I think if I spend that much ill want to upgrade the entire unit. Im hoping that a simple rotozip or smaller router would work for now.

                  time will tell. Ive always have intentions of building a much larger ridged machine which would cut aluminum. This should get me accustom to how stuff works.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by chrisinestes View Post
                    Cool... Is there a control box? I use Mach3 on my CNC router table. It's about $170 I think. My control box is made by Soigeneris STDR-4C... $850. It uses a Gecko G540 to power/control the stepper motors. A smart guy could probably build his own controller with the Gecko G540 and save some money. For tool path software I use Vectric VCarve Pro, which is about $6oo. It doesn't do much 3D though. You can buy ArtCAM Express for $150, it'll do a lot more 3D stuff. And there's likely 78 other ways to go...

                    The router/spindle speed is pretty important to get good cuts and long tool life. But that's a whole different subject, and it's dinner time!

                    Chris
                    Well there are 3 individual boards all with an xyz label. They all seem to have power wires to the board as well as a parallel port. They are all also tied to a single parallel. I assume these are the control boards and no additional board is needed. ( I could be wrong ) If so im going to figure out some way to mount it all in an old PC tower case.

                    The part im trying to figure out is it came with 2 large transformers. One which is 110 to 12v DC and another 110 to 24Vdc. I thought these things needed upwards of 38 volts dc.

                    The 12 V transformer I assume is for powering the fans... but dont the fans take much less voltage.

                    Lastly the 24V transformer doesnt give any diagrams. So I cant figure out how to wire it up.

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                    • #11
                      Check out the out the GRBL Arduino based g-code controller. Puts out 3 axis step/direction and more... getting very mature. oh.. it's free. I used it a year back and it was pretty solid then. Simple UNO board (or Mega, IDE and more) , load program, terminal program or one of several GUI, and start using.

                      https://github.com/grbl/grbl/blob/edge/README.md
                      https://github.com/grbl/grbl
                      Last edited by lakeside53; 03-10-2015, 10:03 PM.

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                      • #12
                        The part im trying to figure out is it came with 2 large transformers. One which is 110 to 12v DC and another 110 to 24Vdc. I thought these things needed upwards of 38 volts dc.
                        24 volts rectified and filtered will get you to about 32 volts DC.
                        Lastly the 24V transformer doesnt give any diagrams. So I cant figure out how to wire it up.
                        Drive one winding with 12 VAC. If the other winding measures about 60 VAC it's the primary. If it measures about 2.5 VAC it's the secondary.
                        Location: Long Island, N.Y.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Axkiker View Post
                          Well there are 3 individual boards all with an xyz label. They all seem to have power wires to the board as well as a parallel port. They are all also tied to a single parallel. I assume these are the control boards and no additional board is needed. ( I could be wrong ) If so im going to figure out some way to mount it all in an old PC tower case.

                          The part im trying to figure out is it came with 2 large transformers. One which is 110 to 12v DC and another 110 to 24Vdc. I thought these things needed upwards of 38 volts dc.

                          The 12 V transformer I assume is for powering the fans... but dont the fans take much less voltage.

                          Lastly the 24V transformer doesnt give any diagrams. So I cant figure out how to wire it up.
                          It has a parport for the computer to be the control box. The computer runs mach or linuxcnc and that flips the bits on the parport to switch various functions on or off. I think you have a handle on how it hangs together though, that is the parport connected card has daughter boards for the stepper drivers which then connect to the steppers. Having them individually done as daughterboards means if you blow a stepper driver or want to upgrade you can.


                          If you look at your stepper drivers, they should have something identifying them which will tell you the drive voltages they want.
                          Fans can take any voltage, you can look up the part number to find out, and probably the breakout board that connects to the pc wants a 12 or 5v supply too, but it will be marked as such.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by MrFluffy View Post
                            It has a parport for the computer to be the control box. The computer runs mach or linuxcnc and that flips the bits on the parport to switch various functions on or off. I think you have a handle on how it hangs together though, that is the parport connected card has daughter boards for the stepper drivers which then connect to the steppers. Having them individually done as daughterboards means if you blow a stepper driver or want to upgrade you can.


                            If you look at your stepper drivers, they should have something identifying them which will tell you the drive voltages they want.
                            Fans can take any voltage, you can look up the part number to find out, and probably the breakout board that connects to the pc wants a 12 or 5v supply too, but it will be marked as such.
                            Okay you lost me on parport. Is that an additional board the computer needs? My assumption was that the parallel which ties all three of the boards together would be connected to the parallel of the computer running the show. Maybe im wrong.

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                            • #15
                              Sorry, shorthand parport= parallel port.
                              Yes you have it right, the control software on the pc changes the state of the pins on its parallel port, and then relays or controls etc are on those pins and broke out by the breakout board that has the parallel port socket on it.

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