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  • My daughter had to show me how.

    I was trying to determine thread pitch on a deep recessed threaded hole.
    Fitting a pitch gauge, a flashlight, two hands, and my eyeballs into a tiny space.Not working.
    She says "Move dad, I will show you how".
    She wads some Playdough onto a Popsicle stick,slides it in and mashes it side ways against the threads.
    She tells me to let it harden,pull it out and measure the hardened clay.
    I stood there with my mouth hanging open.

  • #2
    Smart kid, good for you.

    Comment


    • #3
      No Play-Doh at home any longer, but I've done the same with Bondo...just remember to use a little bit of oil as a release agent!
      David Kaiser
      “You can have peace. Or you can have freedom. Don't ever count on having both at once.”
      ― Robert A. Heinlein

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      • #4
        Miner: A little trick I like to use is this. It is pretty easy to find out the minor dia. of a thread. Turn a piece of wooden dowel rod about .015" bigger than minor dia. of the unknown thread. Thread the dowel rod into the mystery thread and then back out. This will tell you what the minor dia. and the pitch of the thread is. From these two pieces of info, you can figure out the rest.

        Sarge

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        • #5
          The way I do it is to dump the 55 gallon drum of screws and nuts on the floor and find the one that fits the unknown hole. This sized screw is always found at the bottom of the drum. Thats why I dump it out first, I.e. to save time searching. Then I measure the screw that fits and the size is now known. Now to save time for next time I put that screw back in the drum last so it's easy to find next time !!
          Last edited by ahidley; 03-31-2015, 12:49 AM.

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          • #6
            There are two kinds of people in this world, those who insist on collecting those assortments of left over screws and nuts and those who sort them out.

            I call them the N-1 bin because if you need exactly N screws, no matter how oddball they are, there will always be exactly N-1 of them in there. Always one short. And yes, they are at the bottom.

            I am one of the sorters. I have done that at almost every shop I have worked in.

            Lazy bastards!



            Originally posted by ahidley View Post
            The way I do it is to dump the 55 gallon drum of screws and nuts on the floor and find the one that fits the unknown hole. This sized screw is always found at the bottom of the drum. Thats why I dump it out first, I.e. to save time searching. Then I measure the screw that fits and the size is now known. Now to save time for next time I put that screw back in the drum last so it's easy to find next time !!
            Last edited by Paul Alciatore; 03-31-2015, 01:11 AM.
            Paul A.

            Make it fit.
            You can't win and there is a penalty for trying!

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by 38_Cal View Post
              No Play-Doh at home any longer, but I've done the same with Bondo...just remember to use a little bit of oil as a release agent!
              http://www.instructables.com/id/How-...ough-Play-doh/

              If you need some, you probably already have the ingredients in the kitchen.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by 1-800miner View Post
                I was trying to determine thread pitch on a deep recessed threaded hole.
                Fitting a pitch gauge, a flashlight, two hands, and my eyeballs into a tiny space.Not working.
                She says "Move dad, I will show you how".
                She wads some Playdough onto a Popsicle stick,slides it in and mashes it side ways against the threads.
                She tells me to let it harden,pull it out and measure the hardened clay.
                I stood there with my mouth hanging open.
                Clever, but piece of paper will hold the imprint well enough to measure it too. This is how I determined the thread size on Husqvarna clutch - M14x1.25 LH.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Great! How old is your daughter?
                  How to become a millionaire: Start out with 10 million and take up machining as a hobby!

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Paul Alciatore View Post
                    There are two kinds of people in this world, those who insist on collecting those assortments of left over screws and nuts and those who sort them out.
                    I would consider myself a 'hybrid sorter'- I have fasteners sorted by: thread type (wood, machine, sheet metal) relative size (tiny, small, medium, large, and Good Lord What Does That Fit) and thread form (metric, UNF, UNC, and Could Go Either Way). There's an entire subset of fasteners for specialized use: computer cases, car interior trim screws, oddball furniture fasteners, ect.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by 1-800miner View Post
                      I was trying to determine thread pitch on a deep recessed threaded hole.
                      Fitting a pitch gauge, a flashlight, two hands, and my eyeballs into a tiny space.Not working.
                      She says "Move dad, I will show you how".
                      She wads some Playdough onto a Popsicle stick,slides it in and mashes it side ways against the threads.
                      She tells me to let it harden,pull it out and measure the hardened clay.
                      I stood there with my mouth hanging open.
                      It's fun when your kids show you up, isn't it? Very cool. I like that she just pushed you out of the way to demonstrate, rather than trying to talk you into trying her idea.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Very cool! Kids have great minds!

                        I used playdough to measure the depth of an internal groove a few years ago. I used it again just yesterday to measure spark plug, valve, and piston to head clearances.
                        Andy

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                        • #13
                          Also that low melt Cerro alloy works well. One of the alloys has a characteristic that it cools and shrinks a bit, then grows back to about where it was after a bit.

                          I've used it to measure things like that. When it first cools, you can get it out, then it regains a close-to-correct size after an hour or so, IIRC.

                          Cerro metals got bought-out, but here is the new site.

                          http://www.boltonmetalproducts.com/Home_Page.html

                          The Cerro-safe, now Bolton 160/190 is the one I am thinking of.
                          1601

                          Keep eye on ball.
                          Hashim Khan

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Paul Alciatore View Post
                            There are two kinds of people in this world, those who insist on collecting those assortments of left over screws and nuts and those who sort them out.

                            I call them the N-1 bin because if you need exactly N screws, no matter how oddball they are, there will always be exactly N-1 of them in there. Always one short. And yes, they are at the bottom.

                            I am one of the sorters. I have done that at almost every shop I have worked in.

                            Lazy bastards!
                            The problem is collecting the odd assortments. I'm getting old, smart or lazy. If I doesn't fit my fastener system or has 1/4" of dust on it that goes into the recycle bin. This is only partially true it also has to look like I would never "reasonably" use it. My definition of reasonably has changed. I got sick of the ever growing pile of scrap last fall. Over 6,000 lbs of scrap metal left my place last year and I'm not a machinist or metal worker by trade. I think you sort down to the point it goes into the miscellaneous pile to save creating space for 1 off's.

                            How much space could a guy save with a can of play-dough and some Popsicle sticks? Not to mention the time.

                            It's always inspiring to see a kid's fresh mind at work.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by J Tiers View Post

                              Cerro metals got bought-out, but here is the new site.

                              http://www.boltonmetalproducts.com/Home_Page.html.
                              And going back a bit further, Cerro bought out Titan Metal in Bellefonte PA for whom my father an uncle and a very good friend worked for years.
                              ...lew...

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