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Is Delrin Stong Enough/Suitable for This Application?

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  • Is Delrin Stong Enough/Suitable for This Application?

    I am the proud new owner of a new 7x12 lathe (don't laugh, it's a big upgrade from what I was using before) and would like to do the cross and compound bearing mods. I have some 1.5" black Delrin on hand and was wondering if it would hold up to this application. I am pretty sure it should work for the compound due to how it is mounted and such, but the cross is what I am most concerned with. I would like to also do the cross slide extension, and that is where I am really curious as to whether Delrin will cut it. I have only made one item from Delrin, so I am not sure quite how it stands up to stuff like this. Any insight would be appreciated.

  • #2
    Delrin is probably too flexible for that application. I could imagine some serious chatter.

    Now, go ahead and try it; I may be wrong.

    Mike

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    • #3
      Yeah, delrin is probably not the best for bearing block application on a machine tool that requires rigidity.

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      • #4
        I figured it might not cut it. I have one block about half way done in steel, but my boring setup is less than ideal, so boring out the bearing recess is going to take a loooong time. Thanks for the input, though.

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        • #5
          7 X 12 lathe is not the most solid thing when new. You might as well try, nothing meant by it, but it sounds like more experience would not be wasted.
          mark costello-Low speed steel

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          • #6
            What are you making???
            A gib or ??

            -D
            DZER

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Ripthorn View Post
              I figured it might not cut it. I have one block about half way done in steel, but my boring setup is less than ideal, so boring out the bearing recess is going to take a loooong time. Thanks for the input, though.
              It sounds like you have moved up from a Sherline. I watched the Sherline head engineer running a CNC routine at a show (Robogames... FUN!) and he was cutting thin wisps of swarf. They sort of floated to the ground. I figured he might have set such shallow cuts to allow the demo to run longer, but who knows?

              When I bought my first 7x10, I made tentative cuts of 2 or 3 thousandths. Reducing a 1 inch bar to .625 took forever... All evening if I remember correctly. The 7x12 should be capable of MUCH bigger bites (.025 easily, often more) , and boring should not take a real long time. 5, 10 minutes is not loooooong.

              Dan
              At the end of the project, there is a profound difference between spare parts and extra parts.

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              • #8
                The HF 8x12, or Lathe Master 8x14 is a huge improvement in terms of rigidity without getting too much larger. My 8x14 I rate extremely close to the capabilities of my South Bend 9"

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                • #9
                  Delrin (or acetal) will work just fine. It has higher impact resistance than mild steel. It has been used as the cams in Briggs & Stratton engines for decades and I am using it for the main bearings on the scotch yoke on my 16" shaper. The sliding linear bearings on my CNC mill are made from plain PTFE (Teflon) which has only 1000 psi compression strength, 1/10th the strength of Delrin. They haven't moved shape at all in 8 years and it has been used a lot.
                  Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

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