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Made some progress on that old Metalcraft lathe

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  • J Tiers
    replied
    Not yet, it's not "commissioned work". I suppose I could offer that sort of service if I ever retire and get bored, but I strongly doubt there is any market for the only sort of refurb I would consider doing, which would include a re-scrape and alignment (no re-scrape and alignment here, it wasn't worn enough to need it particularly, and that would be beyond what is reasonable for this machine.)

    If my friend doesn't want it (he gets the option to keep it) I'll sell it locally on CL for him.

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  • kmilner65
    replied
    Do you already have a buyer for this?

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  • Carm
    replied
    Originally posted by Rosco-P View Post
    Seriously Carm, on a lathe or mill, do you think a heat gun would loosen the old paint enough to scrape it off? Works great if used cautiously to strip interior woodwork.
    I have no experience stripping paint on machinery.
    OTOH, many times had to tie into painted piping which is usually sandblasted and painted with expensive high solids primers and finish. (oil co.'s are ticky about M&R )
    A 9" bare wire brush ( Anderson QC6 bead brush) in a 15A angle grinder sometimes worked but often smeared stuff around and pissed off the helper.
    Oxy/Acy torch usually got used at about 20# o2. Heat a start a couple secs, hit the cut valve and chase the paint off in flakes. Area sufficient for butt weld would be warm to the bare hand when done.
    Wouldn't work well for two kinds of paint; high solids aluminum and Imron.

    Leave a comment:


  • J Tiers
    replied
    The motor issue seems to have resolved itself.

    The motor is indeed oldish.... but it is a cheap 1/3HP Kenmore motor, of the type that looks like a cast frame, but actually is a semi-open frame motor with sheet metal wrapped around the middle. The end bells are cast, with feet that sit on the motor laminations, and long screws that hold them together. Then sheet metal was wrapped around the laminations and spotwelded, and a hollow cast set of feet attached. Patent number is in the 1.7 million range.

    It also has no wiring compartment, two sets of wires entering it, some of which have bad insulation and all of which appear to go directly to coils inside, and there is a distinct odor of burnt varnish. It's possible that the varnish was originally black, and also possible that the visible coils are cooked.

    I'm not planning to find out, I'm going to find another motor. I haven't looked to see if I have any suitable in stock. This one is a frame 424 (old series) which is most near a new frame 56.
    Last edited by J Tiers; 04-14-2015, 12:53 AM.

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  • Rosco-P
    replied
    Originally posted by J Tiers View Post
    It might if hot enough... Most of the regular ones wouldn't get the paint hot, because of all the cold iron underneath. You need something very concentrated and hot, so the paint gets hot and curls up.... Maybe it curls up, that is.

    I don't know if it would work, but I don't think the heat gun I have will do it.
    I have an adjustable temperature Makita (1500w, 1100 degrees F) heat gun and a 4" bench vise with bad paint. I'll let you know.

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  • J Tiers
    replied
    It might if hot enough... Most of the regular ones wouldn't get the paint hot, because of all the cold iron underneath. You need something very concentrated and hot, so the paint gets hot and curls up.... Maybe it curls up, that is.

    I don't know if it would work, but I don't think the heat gun I have will do it.

    Leave a comment:


  • Rosco-P
    replied
    Originally posted by Carm View Post
    That won't work. Politicians are made of hot air.
    Seriously Carm, on a lathe or mill, do you think a heat gun would loosen the old paint enough to scrape it off? Works great if used cautiously to strip interior woodwork.

    Leave a comment:


  • Carm
    replied
    Originally posted by Rosco-P View Post
    Have you tried a heat gun?
    That won't work. Politicians are made of hot air.

    Leave a comment:


  • Rosco-P
    replied
    Originally posted by J Tiers View Post
    Other than politicians, no need for body disposal.

    But I DO want to get rid of the green porch paint. It's not in good shape, but is good enough in spots to need to be fully removed. And the "citristrip", aka "agent orange", is bad for windings as well as people, despite the idea that it is a safer type stripper... The methyl pyrrolidone is nasty stuff.

    I don't think varsol gets paint off, not even acrylic types.

    Speaking of paint removal, that original blue-gray Atlas paint was some tough stuff.... it laughed at all my paint removers... VERY reluctant to come off, and removers only removed the top surface, even when left to work under wraps for a couple hours.
    Have you tried a heat gun?

    Leave a comment:


  • J Tiers
    replied
    Originally posted by Robin R View Post
    I'd be inclined to have a go at the paint with a wire brush in a drill or die grinder, then feather out any chipped paint with some sand paper, anything left at that point is probably pretty sound.
    That's about where I am. First I need to test it. Miraculously, it spins freely. It may be an old ring-oiled motor, they last forever, and were made even in small sizes.

    Leave a comment:


  • Robin R
    replied
    I'd be inclined to have a go at the paint with a wire brush in a drill or die grinder, then feather out any chipped paint with some sand paper, anything left at that point is probably pretty sound.

    Leave a comment:


  • J Tiers
    replied
    Other than politicians, no need for body disposal.

    But I DO want to get rid of the green porch paint. It's not in good shape, but is good enough in spots to need to be fully removed. And the "citristrip", aka "agent orange", is bad for windings as well as people, despite the idea that it is a safer type stripper... The methyl pyrrolidone is nasty stuff.

    I don't think varsol gets paint off, not even acrylic types.

    Speaking of paint removal, that original blue-gray Atlas paint was some tough stuff.... it laughed at all my paint removers... VERY reluctant to come off, and removers only removed the top surface, even when left to work under wraps for a couple hours.
    Last edited by J Tiers; 04-13-2015, 12:17 AM.

    Leave a comment:


  • Doozer
    replied
    I have found paint thinner, mineral spirits, varsol,
    (whatever the common name is) to be safe for
    motor windings and wire varnish. I clean motors
    in my parts washer sink on occasion with zero
    electrical problems from it.
    Now, paint stripper is another animal.
    Methyl chloride is one nasty chemical.
    Want to get rid of a body??
    --D

    Leave a comment:


  • J Tiers
    replied
    Originally posted by Tony Ennis View Post

    What remains to be done?
    Well, it needs something done for a motor. I don't want to put a motor with green porch paint onto the machine, but stripping paint from a motor is by no means as easy as with castings. The innards are pressed into motors, generally, and they also do not take kindly to being dipped. Paint remover is likely to remove wire varnish also, if it gets in through the vents. That would not be good.

    I might get the end bells off, which might be dipped, or slathered, but the main casting would still be left.

    Or I might find a $5 motor at a sale. we'll see.

    Then, once it has a motor, I will make some things on it, just as sales pieces, most likely. " I made these on it" is a powerful argument when someone tries to poormouth a machine. Machines sell better when new looking BUT with some swarf on them, or other proof of being used.

    I'd kinda feel bad getting as much for this as for a "real" Atlas, but then, I can't really see why it should be a lot less since it is clean, working, and I will have proof of it being useful.

    Speaking of paint, I found out that the porch paint was already on it when my friend was given the machine originally.

    Leave a comment:


  • Tony Ennis
    replied
    It's very nice indeed.

    What remains to be done?

    Leave a comment:

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