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Repair Ideas for mill ways?

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  • Repair Ideas for mill ways?

    I picked up a Millrite MVI last week and tore it down for cleaning and repairs before putting it to use. I found some pretty significant gouges on the knee where the saddle rides. I'm looking for cheap ways to improve the condition of the damaged ways. I do not want to spend much money on this thing, and it does not need to be perfect. I just can't leave it as is. I have a full size mill already and pretty much bought this for drill press duty.

    Best idea I've come up with so far is to machine the surface down. Or build it up and then machine it back to original height. It will fit in my full size mill, but set up will be very difficult.

    Any ideas?


  • #2
    Wood grain effect!, it's a bit gnarly, whatever you use stooping the cause is vital, you could epoxy a ground strip on both sides maybe, or just get it reground
    Mark

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    • #3
      Look up "Moglice" as an option, for example http://moglice-turcite.com/
      ----------
      Try to make a living, not a killing. -- Utah Phillips
      Don't believe everything you know. -- Bumper sticker
      Everybody is ignorant, only on different subjects. -- Will Rogers
      There are lots of people who mistake their imagination for their memory. - Josh Billings
      Law of Logical Argument - Anything is possible if you don't know what you are talking about.
      Don't own anything you have to feed or paint. - Hood River Blackie

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      • #4
        Are those box ways? If they are dovetail ways, that surface shouldn't make any difference.

        Brian
        OPEN EYES, OPEN EARS, OPEN MIND

        THINK HARDER

        BETTER TO HAVE TOOLS YOU DON'T NEED THAN TO NEED TOOLS YOU DON'T HAVE

        MY NAME IS BRIAN AND I AM A TOOLOHOLIC

        Comment


        • #5
          The right side looks fine, some scraping still present.
          By chance did someone grease lube it??


          --D
          DZER

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          • #6
            If there is original level surface left, same level as adjacent un-gouged areas, then just fill the gouges with epoxy to prevent swarf from collecting, and use a burr file to level it off flush with the surrounding area.

            I did that years ago on the lathe, the epoxy is still there, despite oil etc. You DO need to clean 3more times than you think is enough, using a good solvent, before epoxying.
            1601

            Keep eye on ball.
            Hashim Khan

            Comment


            • #7
              Also, after you spotlessly clean with lacquer thinner more times than
              you think you need to, follow that with Comet cleanser (or Ajax,
              Barkeeper's Friend, those type of cleansers) and water.
              Make a paste and scrub the surface with your fingers, rubbing the
              cleanser in and rinse with clean water. You should be able to see
              the water "wet" down the surface, with no beading up. This is
              an important step to remove any hydrocarbon residue to promote
              the maximum adhesion. Paint and epoxies no not like to stick to
              surfaces with stray hydrocarbons from a wipedown with solvent.
              Use a water based cleanser for absolute surface adhesion.

              -Doozer
              DZER

              Comment


              • #8
                A quick sidebar;
                With all due respect to Dan Gelbart, I know many people with decades experience in automotive refinishing field who responded with "he's FOS!" when told that "stray hydrocarbon residue" was
                detrimental to their final product.

                I KNOW, I know, I watched his videos too and still think he's onto (if not "on") something but I certainly can't argue with years of positive results either.
                I'M certainly going to try it next time I paint.

                Back on track; you can get a relatively inexpensive sample kit from Moglice that might just be enough for a skim coat.
                Len

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by bborr01 View Post
                  Are those box ways? If they are dovetail ways, that surface shouldn't make any difference.

                  Brian
                  Dovetail ways.

                  Originally posted by Doozer View Post
                  The right side looks fine, some scraping still present.
                  By chance did someone grease lube it??


                  --D
                  Yes, they greased it. For years...

                  Originally posted by J Tiers View Post
                  If there is original level surface left, same level as adjacent un-gouged areas, then just fill the gouges with epoxy to prevent swarf from collecting, and use a burr file to level it off flush with the surrounding area.

                  I did that years ago on the lathe, the epoxy is still there, despite oil etc. You DO need to clean 3more times than you think is enough, using a good solvent, before epoxying.
                  That was my very first thought, but it does seem kind of half assed. I'm not sure how to verify the amount of wear with the tools I have. It doesn't look like the surface has been dropped much, but it's hard to tell with all the gouges.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I wondered if Dan Gelbart was talking specifically about prep
                    for powder coating or all paint or epoxy applications.
                    He was doing powder coating at the time. I would have to watch
                    the video again to clarify. But I do remember him saying something
                    to the fact about people doing it wrong.
                    I did try the Comet cleanser thing last week.
                    I was going to clean up a cast iron lever casting that I had brazed
                    up some cracks in. Running water over the casting, the water
                    beaded up and ran away. The casting was clean, in as much as
                    it had been heated dull red hot from me brazing it. Still the water
                    beaded up and ran off.
                    I sprinkled on some Comet cleanser and worked the powder in with
                    my hands, scrubbing it around thoroughly. After rinsing it off with
                    clean water from the tap, now the water "wetted" the surface, and
                    it stayed wet, as the water now had an adhesion to the surface,
                    instead of seeming to be repelled by the surface as before.
                    So I dunno about needing to scrub with Comet cleanser, but I think
                    it can't hurt.
                    One thing I was thinking of, is that spray paint in the can has
                    hydrocarbon solvent based delivery system. Read most cans and it
                    says that it contains xylene or toluene. Propellent is usually propane.
                    So spray paint is full of hydrocarbons. Maybe wiping a part to be
                    painted down with lacquer thinner is not a bad thing before spray
                    painting, but for powder coating or epoxy, the Comet thing might
                    be a better way. More research is necessary.

                    Why I asked if the mill had been greased, is that I have seen a
                    few machines that had been mistakenly grease lubricated, and
                    about all of them had scoring on the ways. Too bad people
                    make assumptions.

                    -Doozer
                    DZER

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Unless I am missing something, the surface shown on the picture doesn't need to be repaired. Is that the face of the knee ways? Kind of like the bottom of the ways on a Bridgeport ram. I have seen people use carpet to keep from "damaging" the ways when in fact it has no bearing on anything. It is up against air. It could be painted and it wouldn't matter.

                      Before I spent 10 minutes worrying about repairing the surface I would make sure it is actually a surface that matters, which I don't think it does.

                      Brian
                      OPEN EYES, OPEN EARS, OPEN MIND

                      THINK HARDER

                      BETTER TO HAVE TOOLS YOU DON'T NEED THAN TO NEED TOOLS YOU DON'T HAVE

                      MY NAME IS BRIAN AND I AM A TOOLOHOLIC

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        That is the surface the saddle rides on. As was stated in the first post...

                        It is the y axis ways. To the right of the hand wheel in this pic would be upper left of the picture I posted earlier.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by bborr01 View Post
                          Unless I am missing something, the surface shown on the picture doesn't need to be repaired. Is that the face of the knee ways? Kind of like the bottom of the ways on a Bridgeport ram. I have seen people use carpet to keep from "damaging" the ways when in fact it has no bearing on anything. It is up against air. It could be painted and it wouldn't matter.

                          Before I spent 10 minutes worrying about repairing the surface I would make sure it is actually a surface that matters, which I don't think it does.

                          Brian
                          if the surface wouldnt bear on anything how would it get scored the way it is?

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            There may well come a time in this project whare the OP has to seriously consider the minimum requirement he has for this machine and the"distance" (time, energy, money etc.) that he may have to commit himself to to get here.

                            Defining the "start" point will be the initial and possibly the hardest requirement.

                            But seriously, if all that the OP really required was a drill - why didn't he just buy a reasonable sized and quality drill that was pretty well ready to use with minimal (or any) necessary work or time or cost on it?
                            Last edited by oldtiffie; 04-20-2015, 09:22 PM.

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                            • #15
                              I see now. I thought it was the dovetails on the knee that were worn or scored. Lots of times on the Bridgeport knees chips get built up between the knee and the base casting and score the outer edge of the dovetail. Your mill has a different type of dovetail than a Bridgeport type mill has and it looks like the top surface is a bearing surface and should be flat and true. The Bridgeport type mills have an additional machined surface on the Y axisl

                              Brian

                              Originally posted by Boostinjdm View Post
                              That is the surface the saddle rides on. As was stated in the first post...

                              It is the y axis ways. To the right of the hand wheel in this pic would be upper left of the picture I posted earlier.

                              OPEN EYES, OPEN EARS, OPEN MIND

                              THINK HARDER

                              BETTER TO HAVE TOOLS YOU DON'T NEED THAN TO NEED TOOLS YOU DON'T HAVE

                              MY NAME IS BRIAN AND I AM A TOOLOHOLIC

                              Comment

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