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  • Current HSM is best one in quite a while

    Several interesting articles, even if I am not much interested in a putter.... (I WILL putter, but don't own one.)

    I was getting pretty bored by some of the more recent issues, so I'm taking this one as a sign of better times ahead.

    I was even amused by the "Grandpa's toolbox" article..... since I have and use many of the type tools seen, and have quite a 'stable" of J T Slocomb mics up to 4", including ones modified in various ways, as the one shown was.
    CNC machines only go through the motions.

    Ideas expressed may be mine, or from anyone else in the universe.
    Not responsible for clerical errors. Or those made by lay people either.
    Number formats and units may be chosen at random depending on what day it is.
    I reserve the right to use a number system with any integer base without prior notice.
    Generalizations are understood to be "often" true, but not true in every case.

  • #2
    I find the value of HSM not so much in the projects themselves --- I don't play golf, for example, don't need a putter --- but the step by step of the DOING of it has a lot of value in seeing how someone has approached the various problems in making whatever it is. I learn something every time.....

    Comment


    • #3
      I liked the gear article, except for the fact that he used gear cutters that are $50 each and you'll need 3 or 4 for each pitch!

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by Video Man View Post
        I find the value of HSM not so much in the projects themselves ---
        but the step by step of the DOING of it has a lot of value in seeing how
        someone has approached the various problems in making whatever it is.
        I learn something every time ....
        Well put, my thoughts run along the same theme.

        Pretty much every issue shows a way of fixturing an odd shape; using
        one tool or machine to achieve an outcome that ideally would have been
        done with a different (more expensive) tool or machine in the "textbook";
        or perhaps introduces non-metal materials and ways of working with these
        such that they become a component part that enhances a metal object.

        Most interestingly is that, AFAIK, the articles are not commissioned, they
        come from a pool of work submitted randomly by contributors. The editorial
        staff put together each issue by selecting material from the pool using some
        criteria, polish where necessary, illustrate with photos & drawings, add
        advertising and then send the issue to the printer. While all the steps matter,
        having good submissions to choose from and having the judgement to put a
        pleasing issue together from submissions are perhaps key steps to success.

        Even with an unlimited pool of work to draw upon, finding a balance between
        entry level, intermediate and advanced projects in every issue seems nigh-on
        impossible. However, over the course of a year, my view is that HSM & MW
        have both averaged out skill levels favourably.

        In the natural progression, if demand and content availability warrant, perhaps
        Village Press can consider creating another title and divvy up audience
        according to skill levels ?

        Anyway. Now that J Tiers has whetted my interest, I am looking forward to
        the arrival of my copy of the current issue in 7 - 10 days with even more
        anticipation than usual.

        .

        Comment


        • #5
          I wish they could save the gunsmithing stuff for it's own magazine.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by BigMike782 View Post
            I wish they could save the gunsmithing stuff for it's own magazine.
            We kind of do that. The gunsmithing articles appear only in Machinist's Workshop, never in The Home Shop Machinist. Also, we do try to keep the gunsmith content to a maximum of roughly one quarter of the editorial content of each issue, though things do vary.

            Jerry, thanks for the kind words. That issue was put together a while ago so I'l have to go back and refresh my memory to see what I managed to do right.
            George
            Traverse City, MI

            Comment


            • #7
              I gotta be careful about leaving that one laying around. Some of my sons-in-law and granddaughters are golfers, and I will be compelled to build one for each of them.

              Shameless Plug Warning!

              Also, the issue represents a milestone for me. My book "The Electromechanical Arts of Weston Bye" is now included in the Village Press Pantheon of Metalworking Gods*, "The Home Shop Machinist Collection" on page 74.

              My first lowly article appeared in HSM back in 2003.

              *sorry, I couldn't help it
              Weston Bye - Author, The Mechatronist column, Digital Machinist magazine
              ~Practitioner of the Electromechanical Arts~

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by George Bulliss View Post
                We kind of do that. The gunsmithing articles appear only in Machinist's Workshop, never in The Home Shop Machinist. Also, we do try to keep the gunsmith content to a maximum of roughly one quarter of the editorial content of each issue, though things do vary.

                Jerry, thanks for the kind words. That issue was put together a while ago so I'l have to go back and refresh my memory to see what I managed to do right.
                You managed to include several things that made me not notice the ones I didn't care about! Might be that you included some others didn't like, but that I did, though. Takes all sorts.....

                I guess my reaction was that there were more solid metalworking articles. I even like the taper head article, although there is no boring machine here. The hot air whatever-it-is..... well......

                I like the gunsmithing articles, and often find them to be the only thing redeeming an issue of MW. They are always interesting, even though I doubt I will ever get into modifying guns.

                The folks that do not like gunsmithing articles may want to re-consider and take them as lessons in problem solving in the shop. Many illustrate neat methods, and even if you regard the idea of someone actually owning a 1911, or other firearm, as being too horrifying to contemplate, the setups and techniques are of interest.
                CNC machines only go through the motions.

                Ideas expressed may be mine, or from anyone else in the universe.
                Not responsible for clerical errors. Or those made by lay people either.
                Number formats and units may be chosen at random depending on what day it is.
                I reserve the right to use a number system with any integer base without prior notice.
                Generalizations are understood to be "often" true, but not true in every case.

                Comment


                • #9
                  I like what they do and the projects like the 7x12 lathe lathe ones but would like to see more how you build this or restore this like a wilton vise ect tool building I make a lot of those. Or here is a great steam engine to build or ic engine. I get home shop machinist machinists workshop model engineer model engineers workshop live steam and engineering in miniature the last one I like was machinists workshop and the one on a woodworks marking knife next thing I build. When I buildet herald halls grinding rest I could email him about stuff off model engineer forum about it and that helped. I know the usa looks at this differ than england but in home shop machinist may/june there is R Robertson on his miniature tools so how do you build one let see that in there and that is my rant

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    When an article is specific to a particular machine, as in making a part for a 7 x 12 mini or a 9" Southbend as examples, you limit the interest in those articles, for some. People without that equipment (lathe or mill ETC.) are somewhat less likely to read them. General interest articles that are not specific to any one piece of equipment or can be modified to fit any type of lathe or mill will have a better following. Better still are articles about subjects that are not about fixing or modifying specific lathe or mills, like making stand alone tools and machines. In the older mags there where many articles on building shop equipment IE: rotary tables, dividing heads etc. These seemed to be more prevalent in the past then they are now.
                    The shortest distance between two points is a circle of infinite diameter.

                    Bluewater Model Engineering Society at https://sites.google.com/site/bluewatermes/

                    Southwestern Ontario. Canada

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by EddyCurr View Post
                      Anyway. Now that J Tiers has whetted my interest, I am looking forward to
                      the arrival of my copy of the current issue in 7 - 10 days with even more
                      anticipation than usual.
                      Well, I am happy to be wrong.

                      The foregoing was posted Thu 4/23. It turns out my copy of
                      the issue arrived the next day, Fri 4/24. Someone else brought
                      in the mail that day and absentmindly shuffled HSM to the bottom
                      of a pile of flyers. I just discovered the magazine this morning.

                      Mr Bulliss insists VP has no influence over their CDN bulk mail agent
                      and that improved delivery times are a coincidence. Coincidence or
                      not, I am pleased with the improvement !

                      Thanks !

                      .

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I did see a dimension error that is critical in the very fine build article by Richard Rex.
                        The dimension between the .250 pins/dowels for the Aloris style tool holder is off a decimal point.
                        The page 36 dimension shows 1.04 when it should be 1.004 when depth of cut is .375

                        I did like the use of Metric and Inch units together !
                        I believe both units have unique advantages and be used together or interchangably
                        "Never throw the baby out with the bath water" as they say, and in machining all avenues should be employed.
                        Good magazine !

                        Rich
                        Green Bay, WI

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Rich Carlstedt View Post
                          I did see a dimension error that is critical in the very fine build article by Richard Rex.
                          The dimension between the .250 pins/dowels for the Aloris style tool holder is off a decimal point.
                          The page 36 dimension shows 1.04 when it should be 1.004 when depth of cut is .375


                          Rich
                          Thanks for pointing that out Rich. I typically redraw things to try and catch just this sort of thing. Always seem to get caught when I try to take shortcuts...
                          George
                          Traverse City, MI

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            No doubt the preparation for these magazines is challenging, difficult and time consuming, and like others I find some articles less interesting. I have found in reading both HSM and MW something new or forgotten appears in most articles. My viewpoint about the Gunsmithing is; Good show!! I plink at trargets, and like reloading but am really interested in how guns are repaired or modified. In my view point, the publishers have the right mix.

                            Have a good day

                            Ray
                            Last edited by rock_breaker; 04-28-2015, 12:46 PM. Reason: spelling

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by rock_breaker View Post
                              really interested in how guns are repaired or modified
                              I find the work holding interesting. Observationally it seems there has never been a firearm component designed for the convenience of the machinist making or repairing it, at least never in the magazine articles I can recall. And at the same time appearance matters, and as if thats not enough, also at the same time there's all kinds of precision interoperation / interchangable parts tolerance issues. Which makes for interesting articles, even for a guy like me who hasn't shot anything since I got out of the Army a long time ago. I feel pretty good when I pull off 1 or 2 of the 3, but imagine doing all your work all the time to the pinnacle of all three criteria.

                              Hard to say whats a higher display of machinist skill... gunsmithing or engine making. I suppose a rhetorical question I'm happy as long as I see both. And the other stuff too.

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