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  • #16
    Speaking as one who has had several articles and other short pieces published, I believe they use both unsolicited articles and some that are requested, even scheduled. I do know that the selection process is mysterious, secretive, and quite slow. I have several articles "in the queue" at the present time and they have been submitted over the past two years or so. There is no rhyme or rhythm to the process except that, for unsolicited articles, publication in under a year is just not in the cards. They do pay for the articles, but considering the time involved, you are better off making minimum wage elsewhere. It is a labor of love, perhaps some pride, but not real lucrative. I am writing more articles now: I have at least a dozen in my cueue. I was working on an article on a wood project last night; a tape dispenser with measuring capability. This will probably not be submitted to George as it is mostly a wood project. I am mixing my efforts with a metal project article as well. It is also for a somewhat unique and practical item.



    As for things like the gunsmith articles and other, somewhat obscure projects, I have to agree with the idea of reading them to learn the techniques. Gunsmith techniques are among the more precise and delicate machining practices out there. I mean, trying to get a tighter group of strikes at 100 yards or solving an intermittent problem while firing has to be a pretty big challenge. So I do read the gunsmith articles. And I pay attention to the techniques presented there. And I do learn from them.

    George and Village Press; keep up the good work.



    Originally posted by EddyCurr View Post
    Well put, my thoughts run along the same theme.

    Pretty much every issue shows a way of fixturing an odd shape; using
    one tool or machine to achieve an outcome that ideally would have been
    done with a different (more expensive) tool or machine in the "textbook";
    or perhaps introduces non-metal materials and ways of working with these
    such that they become a component part that enhances a metal object.

    Most interestingly is that, AFAIK, the articles are not commissioned, they
    come from a pool of work submitted randomly by contributors. The editorial
    staff put together each issue by selecting material from the pool using some
    criteria, polish where necessary, illustrate with photos & drawings, add
    advertising and then send the issue to the printer. While all the steps matter,
    having good submissions to choose from and having the judgement to put a
    pleasing issue together from submissions are perhaps key steps to success.

    Even with an unlimited pool of work to draw upon, finding a balance between
    entry level, intermediate and advanced projects in every issue seems nigh-on
    impossible. However, over the course of a year, my view is that HSM & MW
    have both averaged out skill levels favourably.

    In the natural progression, if demand and content availability warrant, perhaps
    Village Press can consider creating another title and divvy up audience
    according to skill levels ?

    Anyway. Now that J Tiers has whetted my interest, I am looking forward to
    the arrival of my copy of the current issue in 7 - 10 days with even more
    anticipation than usual.

    .
    Paul A.
    SE Texas

    And if you look REAL close at an analog signal,
    You will find that it has discrete steps.

    Comment


    • #17
      Originally posted by Paul Alciatore View Post
      I do know that the selection process is mysterious, secretive, and quite slow.
      I'll agree it is a slow process, but I'm not so sure about the mysterious and secretive part. All of our articles come from readers and subscribers. Because of this, we have very limited control over editorial content. I can make a few suggestions to frequent contributors and columnists, but that's about as much direction as we have. It's because of this lack of up front control that we need to keep a fairly large inventory of articles on hand, which increases the time from submittal to publication. However, without the ability to choose articles from a broad selection we would severely limit our ability to vary the content of each issue.

      So, the selection process involves looking for a good mix of subjects in each issue, with preference given to articles that have waited the longest. We also have to match the page count of the editorial content to available pages, which are in constant flux as ad sales vary. Nothing mysterious or secretive about it; just a matter of taking a WAG as to what will make the majority of the readers happy and then trying to stuff it into the issue!
      George
      Traverse City, MI

      Comment


      • #18
        HEY !

        I just noticed my neighbor and fellow prayer group (Alberta Metal
        Enthusiasts Network - Amen, get it?) member has a small mention
        and three photographs on page 6 of the current issue.

        The lathe pictured on there on page 6 can be seen as it looked
        last October when Clarence brought it out to a club display.

        I do not know what sort of lead time there is between when
        Village Press gets content and when it lands in my mailbox,
        but you can imagine that Mr Elias made quite a bit of progress
        to complete the lathe in order to submit the photos.

        Also, if you look below the photo of the lathe, you will see the
        finished full size guitar that Clarence made entirely from steel
        sheet, neck and all. This was posted here HSM-Built Steel Guitar
        and there is a link to a video of the build which culminates with
        Clarence picking a tune. Highly recommended.

        If you scroll even further down, you can see several photos
        of the scaled-down Harley which Clarence refers to being
        the reason he built the scaled-down Southbend lathe
        shown on page 6. Clarence actually has more than one
        of these Harleys under construction.

        Oh, to whet your interest ...







        Mr Bulliss, if you can get Mr Elias to submit some more
        substantial articles I propose both you and your readership
        will be well entertained.

        .

        Comment


        • #19
          Well George, I guess it is not very mysterious or secretive to you as you are the one doing it. Probably under a lot of pressure and with deadlines looming. But to the poor author who submits them, it can look a lot like a black hole. Was it too short? Was it too long? Too highbrow? To low? Not enough pictures? Too many?

          Until it ultimately appears, that is.

          Just jabbing back, I know you have a difficult job and do not envy you. And I think you do it quite well. Keep up the good work.



          Originally posted by George Bulliss View Post
          I'll agree it is a slow process, but I'm not so sure about the mysterious and secretive part. All of our articles come from readers and subscribers. Because of this, we have very limited control over editorial content. I can make a few suggestions to frequent contributors and columnists, but that's about as much direction as we have. It's because of this lack of up front control that we need to keep a fairly large inventory of articles on hand, which increases the time from submittal to publication. However, without the ability to choose articles from a broad selection we would severely limit our ability to vary the content of each issue.

          So, the selection process involves looking for a good mix of subjects in each issue, with preference given to articles that have waited the longest. We also have to match the page count of the editorial content to available pages, which are in constant flux as ad sales vary. Nothing mysterious or secretive about it; just a matter of taking a WAG as to what will make the majority of the readers happy and then trying to stuff it into the issue!
          Paul A.
          SE Texas

          And if you look REAL close at an analog signal,
          You will find that it has discrete steps.

          Comment


          • #20
            Originally posted by Paul Alciatore View Post
            It is a labor of love, perhaps some pride, but not real lucrative.
            I have had a few things published and while I'm not quitting my day job, like you I find it fun and satisfying to see something I wrote in print. Anytime I can make a few bucks as a side effect of doing something I'd mostly be doing just for the fun of it, I count it as a win in the same way that I will occasionally pick up a paying shop job. I really don't want to make a living at this stuff, but the extra cash has funded some nice additions to my tooling and such.

            I'd encourage anyone who is thinking of writing up and submitting something to go ahead and do it. George is very helpful if you have questions. It's a bit more effort than it may seem at a glance, but fun and satisfying when you see it in print and get a check in the mail.

            Comment


            • #21
              Originally posted by Paul Alciatore View Post
              But to the poor author who submits them, it can look a lot like a black hole.
              I suppose it does.

              When accepting an article, I make a point to tell the author to check in with me now and then. Although I can't always give a firm answer on dates very far in advance, as time drags on I usually can give a ballpark estimate of publication date. I've had authors suggest that I send out occasional reports of article status, but I simply don't have time to do that. I will reply to any and all emails though.
              George
              Traverse City, MI

              Comment


              • #22
                I have been no so patiently waiting since this thread started.
                The pony express finally made it out to the west coast and my HSM was in the mail today.
                A quick look through and I agree, lots of good articles here.
                You know where to find me for the next while. Sitting back in chair with my HSM magazine and a cup of tea.
                Good job.
                Larry - west coast of Canada

                Comment

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