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L-W dividing head... what did I just buy ???

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  • flylo
    replied
    Thanks for posting this as I had forgotten I had a L-W dividing head so I had my son dig it out. It measure 9" high, has a 5" dividing plate & a 10" threaded face plate with precision placed multiple threaded holes in specific patterns. I have 2 7" dividing plates & pointer with many more holes & 2 diverent patterns that will fit. I remember a friend called about a Big Joe type push forklift at a yard sale so I wenr & the owner wouldn't budge off $100 but everything else was stupid cheap. The push lift I really like because you can dpread the legs to fit around most any pallet & it has a 2000# cap. If you see one that won't go up & the batteries good PM me & I'll tell you the fix as everyone I've bought has the same problem & it's a $5 fix. Thanks again!
    Last edited by flylo; 05-09-2015, 03:04 PM.

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  • Paul Alciatore
    replied
    Your 49 division plate would allow you to make multiples of 7 and 49 divisions: 7, 14, 28, 35, 49, 56, 70, 98, etc. and some of these are much more likely to be useful. For instance, in a motor drive 49 may be used instead of 50 when approximately 5:1 is needed as it will allow the tooth wear to average out over all the teeth of both gears. It is all about prime numbers and 7 is one. That plate has two 7s so it allows the multiples of 7 X 7 = 49. You probably have others that have one 7 in them, like 21 or 35.

    On the other hand, if I were a betting man, I would not bet that a 49 hole circle would be used very often. It is probably there for the sake of completeness as there is no other way to get 49 or 98 divisions with a 40:1 worm and many makers and buyers like to see the spec read all divisions up to XX, often up to 100. For instance, 53 or 97 are hard ones to include as they is a prime numbers so you need 53 and 97 hole circles with almost any worm ratios. Those are rarely included; not never, just rarely.



    Originally posted by john hobdeclipe View Post
    I have a 6-1/2" dividing head from L W, and it seems to be a well built piece. Mine came with a third index plate that went up to 49 holes. This would allow me to make a 1960 tooth gear should I ever need one, but I really don't have all day for that.

    Mine is B&S #9 and I was able to find an adapter to take it down to Morse #2, which is very handy for my needs. It also has 1-1/2 x 8tpi threads on the spindle, which is handy for me also as I have two lathes and a number of accessories in that size.

    Assuming yours to be B&S #10, you could get an end mill holder and make up a hardened press fit insert for it, then grind the 60 degree point with everything in place in the head. There would be room on the exposed part of the holder for a home-made drive dog.

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  • john hobdeclipe
    replied
    I have a 6-1/2" dividing head from L W, and it seems to be a well built piece. Mine came with a third index plate that went up to 49 holes. This would allow me to make a 1960 tooth gear should I ever need one, but I really don't have all day for that.

    Mine is B&S #9 and I was able to find an adapter to take it down to Morse #2, which is very handy for my needs. It also has 1-1/2 x 8tpi threads on the spindle, which is handy for me also as I have two lathes and a number of accessories in that size.

    Assuming yours to be B&S #10, you could get an end mill holder and make up a hardened press fit insert for it, then grind the 60 degree point with everything in place in the head. There would be room on the exposed part of the holder for a home-made drive dog.

    Leave a comment:


  • Axkiker
    replied
    Originally posted by morsetaper2 View Post
    It takes 5C collets, much larger capacity (1-1/16 max) than B&S#9 (11/16 max??). And can be easily found by 1/64's, metric, etc. Plus the available tooling that is available to fit the Harding tapernose spindle.
    Ahhhhh makes sense. I have thought about trying to figure out a way to allow this head to accept r8 collets. Would make life easier for sure

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  • Axkiker
    replied
    Originally posted by Zahnrad Kopf View Post
    Interested in trading for the brother without the Uni ?
    I didnt have any plans on getting rid of this but maybe... ill pm you.

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  • morsetaper2
    replied
    Originally posted by Axkiker View Post
    So why did you go with the hardinge???
    It takes 5C collets, much larger capacity (1-1/16 max) than B&S#9 (11/16 max??). And can be easily found by 1/64's, metric, etc. Plus the available tooling that is available to fit the Harding tapernose spindle.

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  • Zahnrad Kopf
    replied
    Originally posted by Axkiker View Post
    Another thing im curious about is it okay to take off the helical milling attachment. I dont have a mill that would even be able to attach to this so its only being used as a handle. I would rather remove and put in storage.

    Any drawback from such ???

    Thanks
    Interested in trading for the brother without the Uni ?

    Leave a comment:


  • Axkiker
    replied
    Another thing im curious about is it okay to take off the helical milling attachment. I dont have a mill that would even be able to attach to this so its only being used as a handle. I would rather remove and put in storage.

    Any drawback from such ???

    Thanks

    Leave a comment:


  • Axkiker
    replied
    Originally posted by morsetaper2 View Post
    To the OP....Your internal spindle taper is most likely B&S #9

    Go down to the links in post #6:

    http://www.practicalmachinist.com/vb...-parts-131285/
    Maybe I am not measuring in the correct location but my spindle measures 1.250 + (big end) Wouldnt this be a BS #10

    Also thanks for the links...

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  • Axkiker
    replied
    Originally posted by morsetaper2 View Post
    To the OP....Your internal spindle taper is most likely B&S #9

    I used to have an L-W dividing Head, but sold it. Its a very nice & solid versatile dividing head. But I went over to the dark side. I now have a Hardinge dividing head. But anyway, I have numerous L-W dividing head documents in my webspace. In the link below over at practicalmachinst.com you can access links for them all.

    Go down to the links in post #6:

    http://www.practicalmachinist.com/vb...-parts-131285/

    So why did you go with the hardinge??? Not doubting your decision just curious the differences ? I dont know much about this dividing head stuff

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  • morsetaper2
    replied
    To the OP....Your internal spindle taper is most likely B&S #9

    I used to have an L-W dividing Head, but sold it. Its a very nice & solid versatile dividing head. But I went over to the dark side. I now have a Hardinge dividing head. But anyway, I have numerous L-W dividing head documents in my webspace. In the link below over at practicalmachinst.com you can access links for them all.

    Go down to the links in post #6:

    http://www.practicalmachinist.com/vb...-parts-131285/
    Last edited by morsetaper2; 05-07-2015, 09:21 PM.

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  • Axkiker
    replied
    Originally posted by JoeFin View Post
    I still have the CNC program from when I made my own dividing plates - let me know if you need a set
    PM sent

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  • Paul Alciatore
    replied
    I do it a bit different than Marv and perhaps a bit easier to understand. No fractions!

    You want 72 divisions.

    You have 40 divisions on the screw, one per revolution.

    You have 18 divisions on the plate, 18 holes in a revolution.

    40 X 18 = 720 total divisions with the combinations of the screw and the 18 hole plate.

    You want 72 divisions. 720 / 72 = 10. (If you don't come out even, you have the wrong hole circle.)

    So to cut a 72 tooth gear with the 40:1 head and the 18 hole plate you advance 10 holes for each tooth. Easy Peasy!

    If the number of holes you get with this procedure is more than the number on your hole circle, then you need to use one or more complete turns and then go for the remaining number of holes. So if you determine that you need to advance for 100 holes on a 30 hole circle plate, you would use three complete turns for 90 holes and then an additional 10 holes to come to the full 100.

    Oh, and the divisions where I have marked that you can use "any" plate are the only ones where you rotate back to the same hole each time. This would be after one or more full rotations.



    Originally posted by Axkiker View Post
    WOW you are a wealth of knowledge. I guess im still confused though which isnt surprising. So one of the gears I need to cut is a 72 tooth gear. I assume based on the chart you provided I would use the plate with an 18 hole pattern. Does this mean I spin the handle one full revolution and pin it in the original hole I selected???

    Sorry still trying to figure all this out

    Thanks
    Last edited by Paul Alciatore; 05-03-2015, 10:49 PM.

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  • partsproduction
    replied
    the owner of the company was a very strange person, which he was alleged to be.
    I tried to find something about this, I love to read about personalities in metal shop history and wish I new where to look to read about him, but the name L&W stands for two people I believe, maybe one died?

    Leave a comment:


  • JoeFin
    replied
    I still have the CNC program from when I made my own dividing plates - let me know if you need a set

    Leave a comment:

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