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Very O.T. cast iron lead melting pot

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  • Very O.T. cast iron lead melting pot

    Friend brought by an old plumber's lead melting pot, wants to use it for a decorator piece along with two larger ones. It's a six pound cast iron pot, 2/3 full of solidified lead. Surface of the iron is too rough to just knock the lead out with a soft face hammer. Don't want to drill it and create lead dust. Really don't want to melt it out, I've had too much lead, chemical and radiation exposure already. Tried chilling it in the deep freeze for a week, lead seems to have shrunk a little, but not enough. Sit it in sun to expand the pot? Any other ideas?

  • #2
    Do you have a friend to melt it out? Quite frankly it is the easiest and least way to contaminate yourself or any one else.

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    • #3
      Melt it out, a propane burner from an old BBQ works well. As to exposure, stay out of the smoke and fume plume while melting and pouring it out. Pour the lead into a couple of 32-ish ounce tomato cans that have been washed and dried out.
      than give the lead away to someone who can use it.
      Dan.

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      • #4
        Or just support it upside down and heat the bottom with a torch. Unless it has sides that curve in the lead will drop out

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        • #5
          Similar to: http://www.ebay.com/itm/Cast-iron-me...item35e913efb0

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          • #6
            Order the priorities, remove the lead for decorative reasons or excessive weight, or reduce exposure to lead? The two goals might not be compatible with each other. The only way to remove the bulk lead might be to increase both short and long term exposure to lead dust.

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            • #7
              Your going to have to "bite the bullet" ok bad pun and melt, you aren't going to shift it any other way, that's why iron pipes were leaded, it's nearly impossible to shift once in place, the pots cast iron so will break like an old bathtub.
              Outside garden fire with the pot upside down on bricks and a steel tray under it to catch the lead.
              You really aren't going to add any more lead to the environment than tetra ethyl lead did, it's already everywhere.
              Mark

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              • #8
                Originally posted by kendall View Post
                Or just support it upside down and heat the bottom with a torch. Unless it has sides that curve in the lead will drop out
                I like this one. No need to melt the entire mass. Just the contact area... JR

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by vincemulhollon View Post
                  Order the priorities, remove the lead for decorative reasons or excessive weight, or reduce exposure to lead? The two goals might not be compatible with each other. The only way to remove the bulk lead might be to increase both short and long term exposure to lead dust.
                  Originally posted by boslab View Post
                  Your going to have to "bite the bullet" ok bad pun and melt, you aren't going to shift it any other way, that's why iron pipes were leaded, it's nearly impossible to shift once in place, the pots cast iron so will break like an old bathtub.
                  Outside garden fire with the pot upside down on bricks and a steel tray under it to catch the lead.
                  You really aren't going to add any more lead to the environment than tetra ethyl lead did, it's already everywhere.
                  Mark
                  I need the unobtainable: 1.) remove for decorative reasons, while still achieving 2.) reduce my exposure to lead.

                  Sounds like repeated heat (sun) and chill (freezer) aren't going to make the lead release it's grip on the cast iron.
                  May have to decline this favor.

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                  • #10
                    I would do it and gladly accept the Lead as payment.
                    I just need one more tool,just one!

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                    • #11
                      Thanks for the offer wierdscience.

                      Well, even with the lead melted out the pot will still dispense a dose of lead/iron dust. At least it won't be in my house or on my porch. I will suggest the owner give the pots a clear spray coat to minimize that.

                      I'm going to find a muzzle loader or fisherman who wants the lead in exchange for melting it out.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Rosco-P View Post

                        I'm going to find a muzzle loader or fisherman who wants the lead in exchange for melting it out.
                        Shoot..... I would not only melt the lead out, I would bead blast the pot and send it back squeaky clean!

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Highpower View Post
                          Shoot..... I would not only melt the lead out, I would bead blast the pot and send it back squeaky clean!
                          That's a joke right? Contaminate the media and your entire bead cabinet? Beside that would remove all the years of patina and make it worthless. Doesn't anyone hear watch Salvage Dawgs on DIY?

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                          • #14
                            I think it was, mind, I've seen worse
                            Mark

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by boslab View Post
                              I think it was, mind, I've seen worse
                              Mark
                              Yeah, figured as much. So was this part of mine...

                              Originally posted by Rosco-P View Post
                              ...... that would remove all the years of patina and make it worthless.

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