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Very O.T. cast iron lead melting pot

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  • #16
    It sounds like handling lead is as dangerous as uranium.

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    • #17
      Originally posted by 1-800miner View Post
      It sounds like handling lead is as dangerous as uranium.
      It's not necessarily a good thing: http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-c...n/con-20035487

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      • #18
        I have been handling lead for 40 years casting bullets and such. never had a high lead level. if you study the way lead behaves and not the hype you would be less fearful of it.
        send it up to me and I will remove the lead.

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        • #19
          Either melt it out (extremely little risk for a one off if you don't actually boil the lead), or spray both the lead and pot with a zinc cold-galvanizing paint to avoid sacrificial corrosion of the iron pot when standing outside in the rain.

          Melting the lead out is not going to result in signficant dust. Machining it out will produce much more.
          Location- Rugby, Warwickshire. UK

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          • #20
            Merely melting the lead out and saving it, if done outside should not provide any measurable exposure to lead. I've saved lead for years since it's difficult to purchase it anymore and it's rather expensive when you need it. I cast .45 cal round balls for my replica rifled Hawken and from time to time, I add lead to my G Scale model railroad cars to improve their handling.

            Besides my regular lead stockpiles, I have an old Harley sidecar weight that has 50# of lead in it. When I built it out of 1/4" steel, I melted the lead into it with an H.F. BBQ Propane torch. If I ever need it, I will melt it out the same way, making sure to do it outside and stand upwind.

            It's not like you are working in a battery factory or anything. There you would get some serious exposure in a short time. A one time project won't be a problem.

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            • #21
              My father has a couple no eating/drinking lead warning signs that I believe came out of Bethlehem Steel way back when. He told me they used to be in every machine shop when he was a traveling metallurgist due to the lead content in various steels. I know him and my grandfather both were adament about that, no food/drinks in the shop for the same reason. Even today, if Ive got a beverage in the shop and I'm actually working its in a cup with a lid. Along with the many pairs of early safety glasses Ive found its given me some perspective about all the stories of how unsafe "everything" was prior to my time.
              "I am, and ever will be, a white-socks, pocket-protector, nerdy engineer -- born under the second law of thermodynamics, steeped in the steam tables, in love with free-body diagrams, transformed by Laplace, and propelled by compressible flow."

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              • #22
                Years ago I installed a machine in a radiator plant - lots of soldering back then. They issued me a lead monitor badge even for the short time I would be there and encouraged me to drink all the (free) milk and orange juice I wanted from the cafeteria in the cafeteria - Chelation therapy. A good option if you are paranoid about exposure.
                Weston Bye - Author, The Mechatronist column, Digital Machinist magazine
                ~Practitioner of the Electromechanical Arts~

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                • #23
                  Beware of Dihydrogen Monoxide...

                  Seriously, I was a plumber for 42 years, the first 25 of which we used lead joints profusely. I was tested for lead a few times... came out clean.

                  Aside from the 'unwatched pot' oxidizing to dust once or twice, we never used lead at much over the melting point. Get it too hot and the lead shrinks so much after it's poured and cooled that it's tough to caulk the joint properly. The oxides are nearly insoluble in water. According to the Wiki entry the vapor pressure of lead is pretty low at the typical pot temperature...

                  We probably had more exposure to the lead from handling the ingots than being near the lead pot. The boiling point of lead is 3180 °F. I don't think you can get anywhere near the boiling point with a propane turkey fryer burner.

                  As with many things in our world, a working knowledge of handling materials of various toxicity is our responsibility.

                  Don't lick the pot.

                  paul
                  paul
                  ARS W9PCS

                  Esto Vigilans

                  Remember, just because you can doesn't mean you should...
                  but you may have to

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                  • #24
                    Originally posted by justanengineer View Post
                    My father has a couple no eating/drinking lead warning signs that I believe came out of Bethlehem Steel way back when. He told me they used to be in every machine shop when he was a traveling metallurgist due to the lead content in various steels. I know him and my grandfather both were adament about that, no food/drinks in the shop for the same reason. Even today, if Ive got a beverage in the shop and I'm actually working its in a cup with a lid. Along with the many pairs of early safety glasses Ive found its given me some perspective about all the stories of how unsafe "everything" was prior to my time.
                    I used to work in steelmaking, free machining leaded steel was very popular, they even used to give the workers a couple of pints of milk a shift to counter the effect of the lead, how efficient it is I really don't know, it was a common practice around the world.
                    Strangely my father in law got lead poisoning several times in a ship breaking yard, his job was a demolition burner, cutting up ships and submarines in an aptly named ship breakers yard called Wards of Giants Grave!, I suspect the paint caused the poisoning myself.
                    Mark

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                    • #25
                      Even if you melt it out there will still be a lot of dross and filth inside the pot. The only way to get that stuff gone is mechanical, which is going to generate some lead dust.

                      Around here a pot like that is worth maybe four bucks. I have one I've been trying to sell for a long long time.

                      metalmagpie

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                      • #26
                        Originally posted by ironmonger View Post
                        Beware of Dihydrogen Monoxide...

                        paul
                        I never drink water,everyone that has ever drank it has died.
                        I just need one more tool,just one!

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                        • #27
                          Originally posted by metalmagpie View Post
                          Even if you melt it out there will still be a lot of dross and filth inside the pot. The only way to get that stuff gone is mechanical, which is going to generate some lead dust.

                          Around here a pot like that is worth maybe four bucks. I have one I've been trying to sell for a long long time.

                          metalmagpie
                          How clean is clean enough? I don't want to mess with "finish" inside or out. This pot and a larger one are intended to be nothing but decorative. Not a paying job, just doing it a favor. Have found a guy who will get the lead out in exchange for the metal.

                          Thanks to all who offered suggestions and offered help.

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                          • #28
                            https://www.google.com.au/?gws_rd=ssl#q=lead+pollution

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