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Automatic Boring/Facing Head

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  • Automatic Boring/Facing Head

    Came across this 3-1/2" French Gamet (Enco?) Automatic Boring/Facing head on fleabay, slightly mis-advertised so had it for a reasonable price, it has 3 feed rates 0.0005", 0.001" & 0.0015" and takes 3/4" boring tooling.

    No boring bars tho so I will have to make/buy some, still no complaints from me for what I paid for it.









    Paul

  • #2
    I have never used one of those, but always heard they were good quality.
    Kansas City area

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    • #3
      Hi,

      Used to have one. These are excellent heads. Even if you paid full price they are worth it.

      Dalee
      If you think you understand what is going on, you haven't been paying attention.

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      • #4
        So. Are you going to tell us what you actually paid so we can say, "you suck"?

        It looks like a seriously nice acquisition.
        .
        "People will occasionally stumble over the truth, but most of the time they will pick themselves up and carry on" : Winston Churchill

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        • #5
          Agree. Had that same one a few years back and sold it because I have a full kit of other simple boring heads and thought I would not use it much, having a full shop of both manual and CNC machines. I found out what me wife already knows. I'm an arse. Turns out that I find myself wishing I still had it about once month. When one prototypes every day there seems to be no shortage of usefulness to them.

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          • #6
            I don't have and so far don't need an automatic facing facility in a good boring head.

            If I need to face on the bottom of a hole I clamp the job to my rotary table and fit a boring-bar type of fly-cutting tool either in the boring head (uses a lot of head space) or in a collet in the mill spindle - uses a lot less head-space.

            The cutter can be set to face the entire face and/or to under-cut it on its periphery as well - uses a lot less head room than a boring bar in a boring head.

            Start the spindle, position the cutter and then wind the handle on the rotary table - works fine.

            I have a "DivisionMaster" digital drive my rotary table as well if needed but I normally drive the rotary table by hand.

            https://www.google.com.au/search?q=d...w&ved=0CDYQsAQ

            https://www.google.com.au/?gws_rd=ssl#q=divisionmaster

            http://medw.co.uk/wiki/index.php?page=DivisionMaster

            http://divisionmaster.co.uk/examples.html

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            • #7
              I have 3 boring and facing heads. The Enco Model 1002 (smaller version of yours), a Wohlhaupter UPA2 and a Niese-Koroda UFB-3.

              While my Enco is not made to the quality of the Wohlhauper or Koroda, I prefer it for those quick one off jobs. I like the audible click when the feed is engaged. It allows you to easily set the depth of cut when roughing a bore. No need to keep starting and stopping the machine, until you get close.

              My Enco appeared almost new when I got it. The first time I used it, I found out why. The taper on the R8 was ground under size and was not seating in the spindle. The shank was hitting the nose of the spindle before the taper could seat. I cut the shoulder back so the taper could seat.
              Last edited by TriHonu; 05-05-2015, 02:04 AM. Reason: model number

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