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Mill tool racks, carts, shelves, and whatnot. Lets see them!

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  • Mill tool racks, carts, shelves, and whatnot. Lets see them!

    I wanna see your tool storage for the mill tools. Looking for ideas. I am leaning towards building/repurposing my HF mechanics cart as a tool cart. I would like to be able to store it all for the mill, collets, tools, cutters, parallel bars, blocks, oils, the whole bit.
    Andy

  • #2
    I am using a small Kennedy roll-a-round for the mill. You can see it here. Above it, on the wall, is a tool rack I picked up at Menards. It holds all of the frequently used tooling, drill chuck and wrenches, etc.

    For lathe tool storage I picked up a HF U.S. General 44" roll-a-round earlier this year and did a very complete makeover on the lathe area. The cart replaced an open shelf bench I had built for the lathe back in '92. It gets all of the tooling, vises and rotary tables out of site.

    Mark

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    • #3
      I have a rollaround toolchest which I bought at Aldi in southern Germany in August 2014 for EUR 159. It is branded with their "Workzone" house mark. I have previously had good results with Aldi's Workzone-brand hand tools, and I have the impression that Aldi's "Workzone" branded power tools are of better construction than their "King Kraft" brand.

      Chest shown here:

      http://www.weltdertechnik.de/technik...t-ab-11-8-2014

      I am very happy with it indeed - it is of heavy construction. Certainly much better than anything I have seen in DIY / hardware superstores; more like professional quality than home/hobby stuff. It has nice casters and drawer slides, and has really helped me get my too-small workspace tidied up and organised. It cost EUR 159 last August. My only regret was that I could not get two of them - I bought one, and was so impressed with it that I wanted to get another, but they were quickly sold out! I will certainly get another if they become available again this year - Aldi quite often repeats its special offers. My other hope is that they might offer a companion sit-on-top toolchest!

      For my personal use, I am considering making one modification - changing the two fixed casters for two swivel units, which would make manoeuvring the chest in my tight quarters easier. With the two swivel/two fixed setup as supplied, I have to three-point-turn it, which requires me to open the garage door, run the unit downslope onto the the driveway and then push it back in uphill!

      I also added a second push-pull handle made of a length of U-profile steel, as the unit came with a single handle, though it is drilled and tapped at both ends for handle mounting. In fairness, the safety instructions do indicate that the unit should only be pushed, not pulled, which would explain why a single handle should suffice.

      Comment


      • #4
        In defence of cheap tools, a lot of professional woodworkers are buying aldi chisels as they are ash handled and very good steel, I bought a set for £9 and they do take and hold an edge really well, even battling through seasoned oak, and a bit of teak, very impressive, my marples ones are very much thicker.
        The garage needs a makeover so I'm interested, I've seen trolley cabinets at machine mart that don't look to bad, ok that aren't snap on but my £1000 cabinets were stolen, I don't think I'll ever afford to replace them.
        Cheap is good for me, Chinese or not
        Mark
        Last edited by boslab; 05-11-2015, 08:07 AM. Reason: Snap on changed to snail wtf

        Comment


        • #5
          Ive got two Cman 26" top chests back-back on top of a ~60" tall Vidmar cabinet. The Vidmar is mechanics tools, one Cman is measuring tools, and the other is cutting tools. The Bport itself has a small rotary collet rack on the side, but I'm likely going to replace that with something bigger/better in the future. In the meantime tho Ive been slowly working on cleaning up and customizing a 50's vintage Remline 26" roller cab I got at auction for $5. I knocked most of the dents out and shot a bit of paint at it, now I'm in the design phase of building/adjusting/laying out drawers and a hutch for it. One drawer will be simply a large collet rack and another will hold the dividing head. Not sure yet but its looking likely that the sides will be covered with three extra mill vises, not sure where the rotab will go but hoping to make it fit somewhere too. Also working a design for a false bottom hutch that will hide the surface plate while supporting a work surface.

          This thread reminds me that I havent touched the Remline in a few weeks, been too busy w/household spring repairs/updates/honey-do's.
          "I am, and ever will be, a white-socks, pocket-protector, nerdy engineer -- born under the second law of thermodynamics, steeped in the steam tables, in love with free-body diagrams, transformed by Laplace, and propelled by compressible flow."

          Comment


          • #6
            So you have to use a ladder to use the top boxes or are you 8' tall?

            Brian

            Originally posted by justanengineer View Post
            Ive got two Cman 26" top chests back-back on top of a ~60" tall Vidmar cabinet. The Vidmar is mechanics tools, one Cman is measuring tools, and the other is cutting tools. The Bport itself has a small rotary collet rack on the side, but I'm likely going to replace that with something bigger/better in the future. In the meantime tho Ive been slowly working on cleaning up and customizing a 50's vintage Remline 26" roller cab I got at auction for $5. I knocked most of the dents out and shot a bit of paint at it, now I'm in the design phase of building/adjusting/laying out drawers and a hutch for it. One drawer will be simply a large collet rack and another will hold the dividing head. Not sure yet but its looking likely that the sides will be covered with three extra mill vises, not sure where the rotab will go but hoping to make it fit somewhere too. Also working a design for a false bottom hutch that will hide the surface plate while supporting a work surface.

            This thread reminds me that I havent touched the Remline in a few weeks, been too busy w/household spring repairs/updates/honey-do's.
            OPEN EYES, OPEN EARS, OPEN MIND

            THINK HARDER

            BETTER TO HAVE TOOLS YOU DON'T NEED THAN TO NEED TOOLS YOU DON'T HAVE

            MY NAME IS BRIAN AND I AM A TOOLOHOLIC

            Comment


            • #7
              I made this and a matching hole in another part.


              It let me do this to lots of old storage cabinet shelves for my manual mill.


              For the cnc, I have a 3d printer now, so I just printed off lots of brackets as per the what did you do today post. Collets below the coffee machine and cspanners and vernier calipers to the left of the qc30 holders. They might be plastic, but I have never broke the morse3 ones I used on the lathe (these are the same holders printed at a larger scale) so I think they will be fine.


              For endmills themselves, still working on that, old toolbox with shallow drawer with them laid flat inside so far.

              Comment


              • #8
                If you have a nice thick piece of wood you can just mount it up on the mills table at about 15 degree's and bore holes for the collets,
                You then don't need to take up any horizontal space as the angle and the thickness of the wood will keep the collets from falling out on the floor...

                it's ideal for area's that were going to be a waste of space anyways and small shops...

                Comment


                • #9
                  I found some ice stick trays in a supermarket in Portugal. These are perfect for holding small cutters, see:
                  http://mikesworkshop.weebly.com/cutter-storage.html
                  Mike

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Lots of good stuff! Keep'em coming!
                    Andy

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      When I built the roll-around workbench for my mini mill, my tool storage solution was to incorporate a huge drawer. It's deep enough to fit my dividing head, and I'm able to pile all my milling-related stuff comfortably into it:



                      The collet rack is separate, not built into the drawer. I made it from a cutting board (for a good, non-marring top), with a thick MDF base and some large dowels for uprights. If I'm doing something involving a lot of tool changes, I take the collet rack out and place it on top of the bench within easy reach.
                      Last edited by mars-red; 05-11-2015, 10:17 PM.
                      Max
                      http://joyofprecision.com/

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Hi Everyone,

                        I picked up some TV wall mounts at a few thrift stores. This is when it is against the wall:



                        And here is when it is in use:



                        I have another on the right side of the mill in a bracket that came w/the mill. It holds my tap & die set in the wooden box. Behind it, the yellow cabinet is a craigslist find w/a smaller cabinet from a local school surplus auction:



                        Besides having ball bearing slides you can lift each section out to move around as needed:



                        More on the way………………………..
                        Best wishes to ya’ll.

                        Sincerely,

                        Jim

                        "To invent you need a good imagination and a pile of junk" - Thomas Edison

                        "I've always wanted to get a job as a procrastinator but I keep putting off going out to find one so I guess I'll never realize my life's dream. Frustrating!" - Me

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          I have a few other file card cabinets but they don’t have the removable tray feature. This one has lathe cutting tools semi-organized by type (HHS, carbide, boring, cutoff etc.):



                          This one is for instrument lathe tooling, electronic misc, abrasive papers etc.:



                          On the wall above the small lathe is a shallow cabinet for common drills, reamers, counterbores, center drills, transfer punches and a few other items:



                          The wire shelves, between the lathes, rests on the frame of a trash compactor that I stripped for parts. I screwed casters in place of the levelers and fastened 2 shelves to it. I didn’t want a solid cabinet here because I like the light that the window provides:



                          Still more on the way……………………………
                          Last edited by jhe.1973; 05-13-2015, 01:09 AM.
                          Best wishes to ya’ll.

                          Sincerely,

                          Jim

                          "To invent you need a good imagination and a pile of junk" - Thomas Edison

                          "I've always wanted to get a job as a procrastinator but I keep putting off going out to find one so I guess I'll never realize my life's dream. Frustrating!" - Me

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            This cabinet I use for heavy mill & lathe accessories and it is on top of a fabricated stand to provide a shelf for my toolpost grinder and a couple of tool boxes. The cabinet is quite heavy and is very old w/faded yellow pinstripes on the doors, like they used to do with floor safes:



                            My shop bench rests on plywood pads to give enough clearance to store my gauge pins on top of two dressers from a college dorm undergoing renovation. They organize (?) my measuring tools, dial indicators, micrometers and their accessories. One of the drawers stores electrical testing equipment:



                            At the right end of this bench, my cast iron surface plate rests on a cabinet for my parallels, gauge blocks and other set up tooling for the B-port.



                            I added casters to this cabinet (as I will to most of my crap) because the shop is ………. cozy.

                            Yeah, that’s it. It’s not crowded ………….. no ……….., it’s cozy.

                            A real step saver.

                            Last edited by jhe.1973; 05-14-2015, 01:22 AM.
                            Best wishes to ya’ll.

                            Sincerely,

                            Jim

                            "To invent you need a good imagination and a pile of junk" - Thomas Edison

                            "I've always wanted to get a job as a procrastinator but I keep putting off going out to find one so I guess I'll never realize my life's dream. Frustrating!" - Me

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Great shop, Jim, and some clever storage ideas too! I love that little Derbyshire, btw.
                              Max
                              http://joyofprecision.com/

                              Comment

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