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  • 6 jaw chucks

    These things are expensive, I had a thought, has anyone converted a 3 jaw to a 6 by milling three more slots in, it's probably a silly idea as I have absolutely no idea if you could get jaws to fit, making them myself seems somewhat impossible, any thoughts as to replace the one I lost turns out not to have any change from £1000, it was a Pratt
    Mark

  • #2
    I've never considered making a 6 jaw chuck for many reasons

    Originally posted by boslab View Post
    These things are expensive, I had a thought, has anyone converted a 3 jaw to a 6 by milling three more slots in, it's probably a silly idea as I have absolutely no idea if you could get jaws to fit, making them myself seems somewhat impossible, any thoughts as to replace the one I lost turns out not to have any change from £1000, it was a Pratt
    Mark
    They are only useful for tubing and other compliant workpieces due to the fact that they have opposed chuck jaws. Only TWO can really come to bear on the work unless flex in some part of the set up dominates. A 6 jaw has every accuracy weakness of the scroll that a three jaw does. One can't expect miracles just by adding jaws.

    I will give 6 jaw chucks the nod in accuracy just because there are no "cheap" ones seen on the market. The offerings are made by manufacturer's that take the trouble to do it right.

    For my money, It's machinable soft jaws every time!

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    • #3
      I'll go with that, it was for tube as it happens.
      Ta
      Mark

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      • #4
        They are nice for thin wall tube, plastic tub, soft materials etc. so you don't deform the tube as much when tightening down.

        JL...........

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        • #5
          6 jaws work so well for tubing for one main reason, The 6 jaws squeeze and force the tube to stay "round" as compared as 3 jaws squeezing and forming the tubing into a triangle shape. Now that your tube has formed to the 6 points, its more round and has 6 points of contact giving you a better hold.

          If you are going to put solid stock in a 6 jaw it better be ground stock. If you put a piece of cold rolled (or even turned) that is slightly out of round, you are going to have 2 points of contact, at best and you can bet that sucker is going to spin.

          I do a job a few times a year using metric TGP, The 6 jaw works great for that and if I have to hold two bearing halfs together after re-babbiting them ... other than that, my 6 jaws sit on the shelf and eat gun rem oil.

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          • #6
            This doesn't do the OP any good since he is on the other side of the pond, but Grizzly offers a 6" 6-jaw for a reasonable price. I have one, it works OK for the intended purposes.

            Gunsmiths like 6 jaws because they are less likely to mar a barrel and they can be dialed in for zero runout. I've also used the 6 jaw for holding pistons without damaging the piston. But mostly it sits on the shelf because it is a specialty tool and not as rugged and doesn't grip as tight as a 3 jaw.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by MTNGUN View Post
              This doesn't do the OP any good since he is on the other side of the pond, but Grizzly offers a 6" 6-jaw for a reasonable price. I have one, it works OK for the intended purposes.

              Gunsmiths like 6 jaws because they are less likely to mar a barrel and they can be dialed in for zero runout. I've also used the 6 jaw for holding pistons without damaging the piston. But mostly it sits on the shelf because it is a specialty tool and not as rugged and doesn't grip as tight as a 3 jaw.
              For that Grizzly chuck, What the "h--l is the drilling at the business end of the jaws? seems like ribbons on a pig.

              Perhaps the holes fit some logical sized dowels. ...

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              • #8
                I'll try to remember to take a look at the chuck in the morning. Maybe bolts go there? It has bolt-on jaws.

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                • #9
                  I call BS. I use a Buck 6 jaw as the primary chuck on my lathe and I have never had any stock spin or only have two points of contact. My 6 jaw is my go-to for just about anything that is not square.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by CalM View Post
                    For that Grizzly chuck, What the "h--l is the drilling at the business end of the jaws? seems like ribbons on a pig.

                    Perhaps the holes fit some logical sized dowels. ...
                    Hidden bolt for two piece jaws.
                    “I know lots of people who are educated far beyond their intelligence”

                    Lewis Grizzard

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                    • #11
                      I have a 6 jaw chuck I got from tool4cheap a few years back. It has worked very well. One thing to remember about a 6 jaw chuck is I can remove jaws to have a 2 jaw, 3 jaw, or 4 jaw chuck.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by quadrod View Post
                        I have a 6 jaw chuck I got from tool4cheap a few years back. It has worked very well. One thing to remember about a 6 jaw chuck is I can remove jaws to have a 2 jaw, 3 jaw, or 4 jaw chuck.
                        Yeah, I've had occasion to use a 5-jaw chuck when I has something with a projection on one side. I know, I know, a 3-jaw would have done the job but a 6 is what I have and use for everything.
                        .
                        "People will occasionally stumble over the truth, but most of the time they will pick themselves up and carry on" : Winston Churchill

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                        • #13
                          They'er nice , but don't really hold up well for heavy cuts. A heavy cut will throw them out of wack and you'll have to recenter. That being said I own two and for some work they can't be beat. Like others have said they good to have for tubing.

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                          • #14
                            Holes could be used for pins to clamp a ring to apply pressure when regrinding then ID, but of course they hold the second bolt. We always had six jaw Buck-chucks for our lathes but some people would ruin them by clamping out of round hot rolled tool steel and only two jaws would hold. When the workpiece moved their solution was to just apply more clamping pressure instead of changing chucks. De-barked turned tool steel became available in the 60s and eliminated that problem.
                            Last edited by Juergenwt; 05-31-2015, 04:41 PM.

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                            • #15
                              They are top jaws.
                              Top jaws. Look it up and get hip to it.
                              They can be hard or soft. ID or OD.
                              Basic lathe stuff.

                              -D
                              DZER

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