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Tool ID Assistance: 'Do You Know Me?'

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  • Tool ID Assistance: 'Do You Know Me?'

    Perhaps someone here can identify the purpose and
    origins of the following tools
    1. Hand clamp or vise tool with a max jaw opening of 5/16".
      Stamped "GFC" on one side, "W Germany" on the other.


      .
    2. An overarm with 'C 601' cast into the body and a base
      with 'C 600' cast underneath. Overarm features what
      appears to be a swivel clamp for thin work pieces.





    .

  • #2
    The first is a special tool for installing hydrocoptic marzlevanes, and the second is used to reverse retro-untorque metapolar refractive pilfrometers.
    This is the ending.... still your need is driven on (driven on) as we trigger one more bomb...

    Comment


    • #3
      The first is presumably a type of hand vise, possibly for a special purpose, perhaps just for a certain general occupation.

      I have one similar, but likely a lot older. Mine is patented, PN 166553. It is a hand vise, but the patent office has associated the wrong drawings with it, so when you go to drawings, you get the drawing for a "vent valve" with a patent number a few off of this one.



      Last edited by J Tiers; 06-22-2015, 01:23 PM.
      1601

      Keep eye on ball.
      Hashim Khan

      Comment


      • #4
        What left handed spud wrench said. Geeze, now I'm gonna spend the rest if the day goggling those words.. lol

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by J Tiers View Post
          The first is presumably a type of hand vise, possibly for a special purpose,
          perhaps just for a certain general occupation.
          Thank you - "Hand Vise" it is.

          The descriptive name for this kind of tool appears to be "Lowell Pattern Hand Vise".
          Used for working with wire, twisting and/or drawing to size using a draw plate,
          which explains the aggressive diagonal jaw serrations. I had not noticed before,
          but the handle is hollow for its full length to allow wire to pass through

          This eBay example looks like a chrome/nickel plated copy of my tool.


          This is said to be an example of a genuine Lowell made in Poland. Many
          of the jewelry supply houses offer this model.



          Originally posted by J Tiers
          I have one similar, but likely a lot older. Mine is patented, PN 166553.
          It is a hand vise, but the patent office has associated the wrong drawings with it
          The handle on yours appears to be solid and the tool looks larger
          than mine - perhaps a model intended exclusively for twisting
          without provision for drawing?

          Perhaps Mr Einstein was distracted that day at work at the
          Patent Office ?

          .

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Left Handed Spud Wrench View Post
            The first is a special tool for installing hydrocoptic marzlevanes, and the second is used to reverse retro-untorque metapolar refractive pilfrometers.
            And here I thought they were 6" rulers

            Comment


            • #7
              Initially, I suspected the overarm tool was used for
              engraving or pantograph work. Now I believe it is
              for cutting metal disks by hand or under power.

              Like so



              .

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by EddyCurr View Post
                Thank you - "Hand Vise" it is.

                The descriptive name for this kind of tool appears to be "Lowell Pattern Hand Vise".
                Used for working with wire, twisting and/or drawing to size using a draw plate,
                which explains the aggressive diagonal jaw serrations. I had not noticed before,
                but the handle is hollow for its full length to allow wire to pass through
                ...

                The handle on yours appears to be solid and the tool looks larger
                than mine - perhaps a model intended exclusively for twisting
                without provision for drawing?
                ....

                Mine is about 4 1/2 inches long, the hex handle is about 0.2" across flats, and it is hollow, hole around 0.09" diameter. Jaws are finely checkered.
                1601

                Keep eye on ball.
                Hashim Khan

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by J Tiers View Post
                  Mine is about 4 1/2 inches long, the hex handle is about 0.2" across flats,
                  and it is hollow, hole around 0.09" diameter. Jaws are finely checkered.
                  Even smaller than mine - photo is deceptive.

                  Is the hex portion of the handle a constant size or tapered?
                  Since posting earlier, I wondered whether some kind of handle
                  fits onto the hex. The necked end of the shaft is distinctly
                  shaped, looks like a pull stud - maybe a retainer hooks into/onto
                  the shaft end to keep a grip handle in place?

                  .

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I don't know if any other part goes on, I'd have to check the patent again. If it does, I don't have that part.

                    The hex is constant size. I was wrong about the through-hole, should have measured, it's actually just under 1/8" ID. What I saw was a little dirt making it look smaller.
                    1601

                    Keep eye on ball.
                    Hashim Khan

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      The first tool is what the dentist used to remove my molars.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        From official gazette 1876

                        looks like the end is pretty much decorative, but it may have an undisclosed function

                        1601

                        Keep eye on ball.
                        Hashim Khan

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by EddyCurr View Post
                          Initially, I suspected the overarm tool was used for
                          engraving or pantograph work. Now I believe it is
                          for cutting metal disks by hand or under power.

                          Like so



                          .
                          Yes, I'm fairly sure that's off a Berkroy circle shear. I had one years ago.

                          Berkroy made light duty bench type sheet metal equipment. Their equipment was widely used in high school shops. The stuff mostly was for 22ga and under.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            DR knows his stuff:

                            http://www.worthpoint.com/worthopedi...-circle-cutter

                            Seems you have half of a model 530.
                            Definition: Racecar - a device that turns money into noise.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Thank you DR and browne92 for identifying this
                              as a Berkroy product.

                              With your information, I came across a Berkroy
                              advert on p325 of the April 1948 issue of Popular
                              Mechanics.


                              There my component is shown as an accessory called
                              a "Clamping Head for cutting inside and outside circles".
                              List price - $7.50. The Berkroy shear itself lists at $19.50.
                              How times have changed.

                              Regards,
                              Ken R.

                              Comment

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