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  • shaper

    What size motor does a 8 inch shaper need?

    krankie frankie

  • #2
    krankie: Not sure that they make them that small. maybe just a strong arm. Seriously, I have a 12"shaper and I took the 3 phase motor off and put a 1/2hp - 120 volt-single phase motor on and it works fine. You are probably going to ask me what size the 3 phase motor was and I don't remember. It is on a shelf in the shop and I'm in the house for the evening. Hope this helps.

    Sarge

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    • #3
      My 7" Logan has a 1/2 HP 110 volt.

      Comment


      • #4
        I have a 7" South Bend Shaper and it also has a 1/2 HP motor.

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        • #5
          The Atlas' are supposed to have a 1/3 hp, mine runs fine on 1/4 hp.
          "I am, and ever will be, a white-socks, pocket-protector, nerdy engineer -- born under the second law of thermodynamics, steeped in the steam tables, in love with free-body diagrams, transformed by Laplace, and propelled by compressible flow."

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          • #6
            Thanks guys there seems to be agreement that they do not need a lot of power. I got a line on one without a motor, and I do believe I have a 1/2 horse laying around some where.

            krankie frankie

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            • #7
              My 8" Boxford has a 1/2 HP.

              Paul

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              • #8
                Originally posted by _Paul_ View Post
                My 8" Boxford has a 1/2 HP.

                Paul
                What he said.
                Brand new single phase 220V Mitsubishi.

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                • #9
                  A lot depends on the highest stroking speed and stroke, material, tooling and required cross feeds as well as well.

                  My 11" shaper has three speeds/pulley pairs which work very well. It has a three-speed1 HP 230v 50Hz motor (variable from normal speed and 1/3 of it) which makes it very versatile.

                  But do check inside the shaper casting and see that the forward stroke is used for cutting (and is slowest) and that the return stroke is faster and is the stroke that the cross-feed is driven by.

                  The shaper (Whitworth) linkage and drive is shown here in diagrammatic form:

                  https://www.google.com.au/search?q=w...w&ved=0CCkQsAQ

                  https://www.google.com.au/search?q=g...turn+mechanism
                  Last edited by oldtiffie; 06-25-2015, 08:50 PM.

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                  • #10
                    7 inch Porter Cable here, (pre 1941,) and it has a 1/2 hp, which is also recommended in the literature.

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                    • #11
                      My 12" Vernon has a 1hp 3 phase 220VAC
                      Randy
                      Do yourself a favor and see if your TV carrier has America One News Network (AONN). 208 on Uverse. It is good old fashion news, unlike the networks, with no hype, bias or other BS.

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                      • #12
                        Frankie: If that info that old tiffie said in post #(9) is confusing, it simply means that if the forward stroke (cutting stroke) is the fastest, then your motor is running backwards.

                        sarge

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                        • #13
                          That's true.

                          But it also means that the cross feed stroke should be on the back stroke or else the cut edge will not be parallel to the ram and its stroke.

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by oldtiffie View Post
                            That's true.

                            But it also means that the cross feed stroke should be on the back stroke or else the cut edge will not be parallel to the ram and its stroke.
                            That's true to a point. On many shapers, the feed stroke selection was optional, and if it was set to feed on the cut stroke and if there was a bit of room on the beginning of the stroke, the feed movement would be finished before the cut actually started.

                            Sarge

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                            • #15
                              When I got my Atlas shaper the feed was wrongly set to move the table on the cut. It is an easy error to make with that design. The ratchet is reversible but that doesn't change the fact that the thing had been assembled wrong (not done per the manual). It has the original motor which of course turns the correct direction.

                              There is a video on youtube that shows a very large shaper that is running backward. I'll see if I can find that link. BRB...

                              Nope - can't locate it. But here's ol' Tubalcain with a mockup of the reversed motor direction problem:

                              https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Jx5nOn0tf_k

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