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CX601 Milling Machine

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  • #16
    Forgot to post second bracket--Now things are out of sequence.--Oh well----Another one bites the dust!! I have one more bracket to build that doesn't fit against the curved surface of the milling machine. It is probably the most complex shape, but doesn't have to be fitted by trial and error to the cast mill surface.--And yes, after milling two brackets, I am finding those .0025" graduations to be just as hard as I had expected to work with. Its easy to take out the 1/8" increments, because they are one full dial turn. Then you have to divide whatever is left by .0025 and count graduations---and many of the graduations you want to hit fall somewhere between the graduation marks.--I did have a stroke of good luck, in that while rooting though my box of aluminum cut-offs I found sufficient stock to make all of the brackets.
    Brian Rupnow
    Design engineer
    Barrie, Ontario, Canada

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    • #17
      Looking great Brian! Once you get that DRO fired up you will wonder how you ever did without it! I would hate to have to go back to just dials even on a Bridgeport.
      Kansas City area

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      • #18
        And that, boys and girls, is all of the brackets made!!! I haven't cut the contour on the two brackets that attach to the mill base yet. I'll save that for another day. The bracket on the right bolts to the face of the mill base, right beside the Y axis dial. The left side bolts to the side of the mill base, right in that nasty radiused area. The piece attached to the DRO angle bracket bolts to the carriage which fits between the mill table and the base. (The angle is facing the wrong way round in the picture.) The outstanding leg of the angle bolts to the underside of the Y axis read head. The bar setting between my brackets is supplied by the DRO guys, and you will notice it has jack-screws at each end to level it perfectly and to make it parallel with the Y axis travel. The guard bolts to the two 1/4"-20 tapped holes just above the bar.
        Brian Rupnow
        Design engineer
        Barrie, Ontario, Canada

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        • #19
          --The scary part comes next---Drilling and tapping holes in my new mill. The folks who sell the DRO kit have an installation manual that goes on at great length about how important it is to have perfect, alignment, perfect parallelism between all components, no binding, etcetera. I am a bit freaked out by this, but will forge on bravely. There are about a zillion milling machines running around the world with "add on" DRO kits on them, so I should be able to make it work. As soon as I get the DRO kit up and running, I will do the modification to lower the head lifting handwheel. Then I have to disassemble everything and move it into my machine shop, then reassemble everything.--I can see all of this eating up a sizeable portion of July.---Brian
          Brian Rupnow
          Design engineer
          Barrie, Ontario, Canada

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          • #20
            It's not to bad,you have the hard part done which is making the various brackets.I've done several,the x axis is easiest.I just clamped a couple parallels to the table one at each end and used a space block to set the scale parallel to the table.It ended up with in .005" end to end.

            The y axis,I just mounted the bracket I made and used the machine's table travel and an indicator to sweep it in parallel and vertical.Then used space blocks and a straight edge to mount the scale parallel to the saddle travel.

            Mounting the reader heads is fairly easy,just takes a gentle touch so they don't move tightening the screws down.Final step is removing the plastic stops from the reader heads.

            You want to get everything dialed in as close as possible of course,but the reader heads have .010" +/- or so of cushion to compensate for minor errors.Gotta consider too the Aluminum extrusions will expand and contract at a different rate than the cast iron machine they are mounted to anyway,so they have a little compensation built in.
            I just need one more tool,just one!

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            • #21
              Originally posted by brian Rupnow View Post
              --The scary part comes next---Drilling and tapping holes in my new mill. The folks who sell the DRO kit have an installation manual that goes on at great length about how important it is to have perfect, alignment, perfect parallelism between all components, no binding, etcetera. I am a bit freaked out by this, but will forge on bravely. There are about a zillion milling machines running around the world with "add on" DRO kits on them, so I should be able to make it work. As soon as I get the DRO kit up and running, I will do the modification to lower the head lifting handwheel. Then I have to disassemble everything and move it into my machine shop, then reassemble everything.--I can see all of this eating up a sizeable portion of July.---Brian
              Looks great so far Brian. By the looks of your work, you have more experience than I do at machining and I managed to get my DRO to work, so I doubt you'll have much trouble with the alignment.

              Once you get around to the mods for the column hand wheel, I hope you'll share as it is one thing I've wanted to do to mine. I've also considered a power option for that. I did add the Y axis power feed from Busy Bee and like how it saves a lot of hand cranking.

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              • #22
                BMW rider--Great to hear from you on the forum!!! I will definitely post the entire "how to" when I get to the handwheel relocation. It is very simple once you have seen it done.---Brian
                Brian Rupnow
                Design engineer
                Barrie, Ontario, Canada

                Comment


                • #23
                  And this is, I think, what they call "Beyond the point of no return!!" The mill is drilled and tapped for my home made brackets, which in turn hold the "backing bar" supplied by the DRO company, and the glass scale mounts to it. The drilling and tapping was very straightforward. A LOT of measuring, some breath holding, and away we went. No broken taps, no holes in the wrong place, all went well. Next up is fitting the funky bracket that attaches to the reading head.


                  Brian Rupnow
                  Design engineer
                  Barrie, Ontario, Canada

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                  • #24
                    And one last picture because I am only allowed three pictures in one post.
                    Brian Rupnow
                    Design engineer
                    Barrie, Ontario, Canada

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                    • #25
                      And Oh Heck, yeah, since we are in full pictorial mode, this is the Y axis guard bolted in place.

                      Brian Rupnow
                      Design engineer
                      Barrie, Ontario, Canada

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                      • #26
                        That extended tap wrench is sure the cat's meow! I have to put one together.

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                        • #27
                          It sure helps when you get into an area where you have limited "swing room" for a standard tap handle. The one in the picture has a trick---it has a reversible ratchet capability built into it.--I didn't make it. I bought it.---Brian
                          Brian Rupnow
                          Design engineer
                          Barrie, Ontario, Canada

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                          • #28
                            This entire bracket business is somewhat subjective---You measure, you design, you build, and then in the final go-round, you file a little bit here, grind a little bit there, and make it fit. I had planned on using one of the brackets which came with the "kit" to attach to the "reading head" of the Y scale, but it turned out to work better if I made a new bracket cut from 3" x 3" x 1/4" aluminum angle. Everything is slotted to give me lots of flexibility for aligning everything, and if I need to I can always use some shim stock between the parts which bolt to the cast surfaces of the mill and the mill body. I have two holes left to drill and tap to complete the Y axis installation, so I am of to do that next.---Brian
                            Brian Rupnow
                            Design engineer
                            Barrie, Ontario, Canada

                            Comment


                            • #29
                              And that, gentlemen, is all of the brackets finished for the Y axis. Now it's simply a matter of leveling, shimming, and measuring until the Y axis scale and guard are mounted. Tomorrow, I hope to accomplish that and move on to the x axis. --Brian

                              Brian Rupnow
                              Design engineer
                              Barrie, Ontario, Canada

                              Comment


                              • #30
                                Hi Brian, I have been riding along with your progress. Nice work as usual from you.
                                Your comment on making it fit reminded me of the time when I used to work with the engineering dept. of the Caterpillar dealer I worked for.
                                We adapted and mounted all sorts of different things to machines. I recall several times when the draftsman were getting behind and things weren't fitting as well as they would like the head of engineering would tell
                                us to go ahead and make it fit/ work and we will do the drawings later. I guess that's what you call reverse engineering. It was very interesting work and kept your head busy.
                                Larry - west coast of Canada

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