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CX601 Milling Machine

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  • Sparky_NY
    replied
    Originally posted by brian Rupnow View Post
    Perhaps I called them the wrong thing. What I actually bought three of were R8 endmill holders that would hold a tool with a 3/4" diameter shank. They looked great, but the shank on the annular cutters weren't long enough to reach up to where the single set screw was.--They cost $31 each. I returned them and instead bought the correct R8 holder for these annular cutters and it cost $76. I'm not sure of my terminology here. It seems like many things are called collets.--And, while I'm here--I have to put in a plug for Amazon. They were great to deal with, very fast response, and no issue with returning the 3 wrong R8 endmill holders.
    Got them mounted and working well for you, that's what really counts ! I am a bit jealous, I have been tempted to get some annular cutters, you may have just sent me shopping. I love using amazon, the price is a bit higher than ebay but the shipping time is WAY faster, many items I get in 2 days.

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  • mattthemuppet
    replied
    what you probably got originally were R8 end mill holders, whereas what you have now is an R8 annular cutter holder. Same bore size, but the giveaway is the 2 set screws 90deg from each other. I agree about annular cutters though, they're a dream to use and produce a beautiful finish.

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  • brian Rupnow
    replied
    Perhaps I called them the wrong thing. What I actually bought three of were R8 endmill holders that would hold a tool with a 3/4" diameter shank. They looked great, but the shank on the annular cutters weren't long enough to reach up to where the single set screw was.--They cost $31 each. I returned them and instead bought the correct R8 holder for these annular cutters and it cost $76. I'm not sure of my terminology here. It seems like many things are called collets.--And, while I'm here--I have to put in a plug for Amazon. They were great to deal with, very fast response, and no issue with returning the 3 wrong R8 endmill holders.

    Leave a comment:


  • Sparky_NY
    replied
    Originally posted by The Metal Butcher View Post
    Awesome! I love annular cutters.

    What collets did you return? I can't imagine having too many. Not having every 16ths would be an incomplete set to me so I can't image returning any haha.
    Brian says collets but his pictures he posted were of end mill holders, not collets. Once again, I am confused.

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  • The Metal Butcher
    replied
    Awesome! I love annular cutters.

    What collets did you return? I can't imagine having too many. Not having every 16ths would be an incomplete set to me so I can't image returning any haha.

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  • brian Rupnow
    replied
    I ordered three annular cutters and three r8 collets (which were the wrong collets.)So, after a bit of confusion (on my part), the wrong R8 collets have been returned and the correct R8 collet to hold these 3/4" Weldon shank annular cutters has been received, mounted in my mill, and a hole cut thru 1" aluminum plate. The "core" that is cut from the plate is setting on top of the plate. The hole was cut in "Low range" at 300 rpm. with lots of squirt on cutting oil. I did get the "birds-nest" of aluminum swarf which has been cleared away to take this picture. They make a beautiful smooth cut, and the milling machine doesn't sound like it is working very hard to make the hole. I am very satisfied. The annular cutters cost about $30 each. I may buy a couple more different sizes---don't know yet. And--I apologize for being such a DICK yesterday. I don't become a DICK very often, but when I do I end up regretting it.


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  • brian Rupnow
    replied
    Thanks guys.--I hope it works as well as it looks.

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  • J Tiers
    replied
    A practical solution, does what it needs to, and looks nice..

    Seems good to me.

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  • The Metal Butcher
    replied
    Looks good to me Brian.

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  • brian Rupnow
    replied
    Okay, boys and girls, here it is. The newly built Lever/lock. When the mill is in low gear, the 1/2" threads on the knurled piece fit in behind the motor cover and will not allow the mill to wander out of low gear. And when the mill is in Hi gear (which it is most of the time) the knurled handle unscrews and lets the arm swing out into the run position. The mill never tries to jump out of Hi gear. Will it work?--I really hope so. Did it cost a lot?--No, $15 worth of aluminum bar and most of a days time to make and install it. My time comes pretty cheap when I'm working for myself. if it doesn't work, I will probably swear a lot (That doesn't cost me anything) and I will let you all know if it doesn't work. If it does work, then I'm happy as a pig in mud. If you want to do the same to your desk top mill, I am posting the drawing of it. It is only designed for the BusyBee CX601 mill, but the concept can be used on any bench-top mill that periodically jumps out of Low range and eats it's nylon gears.


    Last edited by brian Rupnow; 01-11-2022, 04:03 PM.

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  • Toolguy
    replied
    I second what J Tiers said.

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  • J Tiers
    replied
    It is often said that some shop folks refurbish equipment, and some do what they got the equipment to do in the first place. There is truth to that.

    The shortest road to making what you want to make is to buy new.

    I, like Mr Powell, took the other road. Every machine I own, save one, is old, and was (one is still being) refurbished by me. Along the way I have made quite a bit of stuff that I wanted to make, and plan to do even more of that.

    The one new machine is a Delta 1" belt/disk sander, bought new for not a lot. Every other piece I bought used, and refurbished to some degree, from minimal, to an almost complete rebuild and re-scrape. That is now 3 lathes, two mills, two shapers, three drill presses, a die filer, plus incidental grinders etc.. Not all of it I am going to keep. Along the way, machines including another lathe, plus other items, have left the building, and I expect more will leave in the future.

    To me, personally, I feel I "earned" the machines when I refurbished them. It's just my way of looking at it, and I have absolutely nothing against buying new if you get what you want. I also like fixing things, and the machinery has been an outlet for that as well as building up the shop.

    There is also the point that I have, total, spent less for the entire shop, machines and hand tools, than others who bought fewer machines, new. And, I got the fun of fixing things as well as getting and using the machines, so I do not count the work as "work". Only one or two were really extensively worked on with the idea of a sale as the only goal.

    As mentioned, the shortest way to doing what you wanted the machines for is to buy new. It is a very valid and practical thing to do.

    And, if the "new" machine is not all it was expected to be, there is neither shame nor foolishness in fixing that. There is no more and no less sense to fixing a newer machine than there is in fixing an older machine, if in each case the result is what you want.

    I have never built a "riding scale" locomotive. I think it would be interesting to do that, in terms of shop work, but I have essentially zero interest in driving it around a track, so there is not a lot of point in building one, as I'd have it sitting around to no purpose, assuming I got it done. Small engines are more my turf as far as the model area.

    There really is no "right answer", as we all have different goals, and different paths to follow.

    I always enjoy following Brian's projects. Maybe the rest of us should consider posting more of what we do. Brian puts us to shame.

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  • David Powell
    replied
    Brian I fear we may have been looking at the same destination from very different points of view, that is we both want to build models, mine steam, yours gasoline.
    In all good faith you bought new equipment from what is virtually the only seller in Ontario, only to meet with a number of problems
    . I will buy small items and consumables new, but all my machines are secondhand, some of them I have
    bought one step before the scrap man got them and rebuilt or repaired as needed.
    I am rather dismayed by some of your postings in this thread, not because of what you have done, or propose to do to keep your machines going but simply because you have had such a disappointing outcome after buying new equipment.
    Lest others be deterred from taking up our wonderful hobby by your tale of woe I have tried to suggest that secondhand high quality equipment in fair order can be bought at reasonable prices, but that you should have a good idea of how to assess it before even considering actually buying anything.
    Membership in relevant groups can be a great money saver. I was able to help a fellow member with very few dollars to spend to find a 9 iinch Southbend in workable order for $ 300 and a small milling machine, discarded by another member for $ 35.
    Now that he has built a few models and learnt how to use these admittedly tired machines he knows enough to be able to assess any better machinery which he finds which might be upgrades, in his financial capacity.
    Theres no " Right Answer" that fits everyone in our hobby,, The very best thing we can hope for is that every Home Shop Machinist will find satisfaction owning and using his (or her ) tools and in happily using them to create or repair or restore things.
    The most encouraging postings are those which show success.
    Best wishes for Success, David Powell.

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  • J Tiers
    replied
    It's a double gear, so would be a two part assembly, most likely. Not that much of a problem.

    The question was asked as to what else may fail if that gear does not. It's a fair question, but it sure sounds as if the problem lies not in the gear but in it coming out of mesh partially.

    There is also the question of how it gets meshed to begin with, and whether there is any slow damage done to it by getting it into mesh. We, or at least "I", cannot answer that. one would need to keep an eye on it over time, and see if it gets gradually torn up as it is made to mesh. A plastic gear meshing with metal would be susceptible to that sort of damage, and it would not take actual "abuse" to do that damage. Plastic is just softer than, and easier to damage by wearing it down than metal.

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  • The Metal Butcher
    replied
    Originally posted by brian Rupnow View Post
    Okay--Didn't go to bed after all. I had to wire everything up and see if it worked. It works!! Hooray!! Didn't have any left over parts either. Tomorrow I will work on the lever/lock. This is the first time in about 6 months that I've had a "low gear" on my mill. I had a good look at the metal gears which the nylon gears mesh with, and didn't see any apparent damage with either gear. My annular cutters and holders have been shipped and they are on the way to me now. No more 1" hole drilling for me. I will post a drawing and a picture of the lever/lock mechanism. I have heard from a few other Canadians who have this machine, and the nylon gears eating themselves seems to be a common problem with this model. I really do like this mill, and though I have threatened to buy a bigger mill, I don't have the space nor the voltage to run a bigger mill.---Nor the money.
    Do you know the DP or module of the gear? There may be an affordable catalog metal gear that could fit with minimal modifications.

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