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  • Engine Hoists

    I broke down and bought a HF engine hoist. I had to move one machine and renting a hoist was getting expensive.

    Now that I have one, I have used it to load heavy equipment in to boxes, I bought some cargo straps at HF for $2.50 each and found a piece of chain in my shop that will allow for some added conecting instead of the plain hook.

    I have it so it can be broken down into three major sections and will held flat against one of the walls.

    This is really a good investment.

    Jerry

  • #2
    I found a hoist invaluable in installing
    my lathe, lifting it from the truck bed and
    later onto the stand. I borrowed one and
    had to take it apart to get it into the basement and use 100+ # of counter weights
    to lift the lathe at the arm extension that
    would allow an adequate lift. The one I
    used was US made and the cross sections of
    the tube stock was noticeably heavier than
    the HF bar stock. A similar US made lift
    was available in the local Sams' for a yr
    or so for about $220. It also had the heavier gauge tubing. There are limitations of lift height versus weight of lift that
    limit the work envelope of these devices but they are quite useful within that envelope. Limits of 3-4' height and 800-1000#, if you need more of one you get less of the other. Steve

    [This message has been edited by sch (edited 06-08-2004).]

    [This message has been edited by sch (edited 06-08-2004).]
    Steve

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    • #3
      I have an old 1000lb capacity Hein Werner engine hoist where I changed out the bolted joints for clevis pins so it could be knocked down for transport. It is a small unit so it scoots around the shops (cargo containers) nicely. With the round soft loop straps and chain and those break links you can grab just about anything. A load spreader also comes in handy.

      ------------------
      Neil Peters
      Neil Peters

      When on the hunt, a broken part is better than no part at all.

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      • #4
        Do you guys mean like this?



        Rob

        No that is not me in the picture

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        • #5
          Mine was so valuable a friend borrowed it and I have not gotten it back, about six months ago or more..
          Repo man time.
          David

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          • #6
            My mentor, a retired tool and die maker, helped me modify a new engine hoist. Was getting ready to move (1 mile) and had to get shop equip to new house. I bought a 1500 cap boat winch, 2 steel pulleys and a hook with pulley attached. The winch bolts to vert post and cable runs on pulleys through lifting square tube. Being able to snub mill head up tight to boom allowed me to raise head high enough. Have 8' celings. Great for pulling shrubs too. Can post pix if this is not clear.

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            • #7
              I bought the HF version about two years ago. I have used it a lot more than I thought I would. I never seem to have help around when I need it. Now I can scoot machines around my shop anytime I want. One note that was recently discussed on the Yahoo SB group was that the ratings on the HF versions which go to about 4000# are pretty liberal and the hoists should be used for lifts of no more than half that when the boom is fully extended. Used within reason, they are a wonderful investment.

              Perk in Cincinnati

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              • #8
                I have a couple of those 100# lead bars that are used to counter balance fork lifts, and they got used moving my surface grinder, but now I should have a lift for the lead weights.

                Codyb, I would like to see a picture or diagram of the modification that you did to your hoist.

                Thanks,

                Jerry

                [This message has been edited by jfsmith (edited 06-09-2004).]

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                • #9
                  Codyb; I was thinkiing along the lines of the boat winch, have any pics?

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                  • #10
                    CodyB,


                    Is it possible to get a diagram or picture of your modification on your hoist, if you want you can send it to me off list or post it for everyone.


                    Thanks,

                    Jerry

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Well, I bought some clevis pins, and some addition things to help with lifting, such as straps, extra chains, different hooks. Now I use this to lift heavy things on to shelves and other storage places.

                      I found a little bag that holds all of the extra stuff and stays on the hook when the hoist is not in use.

                      Jerry

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                      • #12
                        I have one of the el-cheapo folding cranes and it does me stirling service. Most of the time it lives in the van.
                        I found one of the biggest problems for me was hight. By the time you are high enough the angle has shorted so the job is too close in to the jib.
                        I modified mine to get by this.



                        I carefully grounds the welds off where the top 'U' bracket was welded to the column and also the bottom 'U' bracket that holds the bottom of the ram.

                        The bottom bracket had two ears welded on to fit the sides of the column, drilled thru and a snap pin fitted. Two more holes were drilled 10" above the bottom one.

                        The top bracket was welded to a length of thick walled tube that slides in the column. Drilled thru and a second snap pin fitted. The extension tube also has two extra holes drilled in it, again at 10" centres.

                        Provided you keep to the same number of holes it works just as designed only you have a hight advantage of 10" or 20".

                        If you offset the brackets and go two holes up on the bottom bracket but only one hole up on the extension tube you can get a further hight advantage.
                        This one of mine can now get over 11 feet in lift at a reduced load but still folds up to it's original size.
                        These mods haven't detracted from it's orignal design and since his was done almost as soon as I had bought it, it's moved plenty of machines. At least 5 Bridgy's on my own with no other assistance.

                        John S.
                        .

                        Sir John , Earl of Bligeport & Sudspumpwater. MBE [ Motor Bike Engineer ] Nottingham England.



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                        • #13
                          Below are some pictures of an hydralic press that I built some years ago. The 3/4 hp motor,with low volume pump, is used to position the ram and for light press work. By changing a couple of valves the hand pump is used. Side rails are 1"X4" bar stock and the table is 6 inch channel iron. The winch just winds up the cable to lift the table, you have to keep the table level.

                          I left the provious photo in the album but I think you can find the one that relate to the press.

                          You will see that I got a pretty good on Alistair's green. About 5 gal. of a two part paint.
                          Charlie


                          http://www.photobucket.com/albums/0903/kcprecision/

                          [This message has been edited by charlie coghill (edited 06-11-2004).]
                          Don\'t ask me to do a dam thing, I\'m retired.
                          http://home.earthlink.net/~kcprecision/

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                          • #14
                            I have one made in China that I need to modify slighty but I wouldn't have a shop without it. Compared to the cost of renting it is worth every penny I paid for it even if it collects dust most of the time. When I do need to use it it's a backsaver. I definitly reccommend anyone owning any machinery over 300 ounds to get one.

                            Mike

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                            • #15
                              I recommend having one for anybody who has to lift anything over 45 pounds. Save your back!

                              The last week or so, has opened my eyes to why many people own one.

                              Jerry

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