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New, looking for where to find spindle speeds and feeds

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  • New, looking for where to find spindle speeds and feeds

    I had a mini lathe for 2 years, Recently acquired a http://www.grizzly.com/products/Combo-Lathe-Mill/G9729 .
    I know there are limitations of materials that can be cut on this lathe but ya got to do with what you have.
    Looking for where to find spindle speeds and feeds for different metals.
    Definition: Boat, a hole in the water you throw money into!

  • #2
    Most charts for speeds and feeds are for full size industrial machines, and you ain't got that. Also depends on the tooling, HSS, or carbide. Play around, find the 'sweet' combination of speeds and feeds for your machine and your tooling. As a starting point try 50fmp for cast iron, 80fpm for steel and 120fpm for aluminium or brass with HSS tooling.
    'It may not always be the best policy to do what is best technically, but those responsible for policy can never form a right judgement without knowledge of what is right technically' - 'Dutch' Kindelberger

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    • #3
      FSWizard is a good feed & speed calculator and there is a free (lite) version for your android/ios phone.

      Paul

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      • #4
        Originally posted by _Paul_ View Post
        FSWizard is a good feed & speed calculator and there is a free (lite) version for your android/ios phone.

        Paul
        Thanks, but I'm old school no smart phone.
        Definition: Boat, a hole in the water you throw money into!

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Richard P Wilson View Post
          Most charts for speeds and feeds are for full size industrial machines, and you ain't got that. Also depends on the tooling, HSS, or carbide. Play around, find the 'sweet' combination of speeds and feeds for your machine and your tooling. As a starting point try 50fmp for cast iron, 80fpm for steel and 120fpm for aluminium or brass with HSS tooling.

          I have been playing around with 303ss and 416SS. Want to give the cutter as long a life as possible.
          Definition: Boat, a hole in the water you throw money into!

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          • #6
            Here is some good information. They specialize in small machines so these values should be appropriate:

            http://www.littlemachineshop.com/Ref...tingSpeeds.php
            http://pauleschoen.com/pix/PM08_P76_P54.png
            Paul , P S Technology, Inc. and MrTibbs
            USA Maryland 21030

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            • #7
              Originally posted by PStechPaul View Post
              Here is some good information. They specialize in small machines so these values should be appropriate:

              http://www.littlemachineshop.com/Ref...tingSpeeds.php

              Thanks, Paul I'll keep that for reference, still looking for feeds and speeds for 303 and 416ss though.
              Definition: Boat, a hole in the water you throw money into!

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              • #8
                303 Stainless Steel has a high machinability rating among Austenitic (non-magnetic) types, at 78%.
                http://www.azom.com/article.aspx?ArticleID=964

                416 SS is very easy to machine Martensitic (magnetic) at 85%:
                http://www.azom.com/article.aspx?ArticleID=971

                Some more info on SS:
                http://www.azom.com/article.aspx?ArticleID=2873
                http://pauleschoen.com/pix/PM08_P76_P54.png
                Paul , P S Technology, Inc. and MrTibbs
                USA Maryland 21030

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                • #9
                  My opinion; The feeds and speeds are the same no matter what your machine is. You are dealing with the cutting edges interacting with the metal. You have to match the depth of cut to the HP that your machine has.

                  The ideal SFM and chip load charts are for production shops where you want to remove as much material as possible as fast as possible while wearing down the tool at an acceptable rate. There is always a range of SFM given. As long as you remain in that range, you are OK.

                  Dan
                  At the end of the project, there is a profound difference between spare parts and extra parts.

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                  • #10
                    Cutting speed, feed, and DOC are only part of the story when working with various materials. Also important is the cutting tool geometry, particularly rake and clearance angles, and general sharpness of the cutting edge. Also one may need to use a certain type of cutting fluid. I have usually used very slow speeds, which mostly will increase tool life at the expense of productivity, but sometimes a better finish can be obtained at higher speeds. If the machine has an electronic speed control, it will have about the same torque at slower speeds, which will affect how heavy a cut you can take, whereas belt change types increase torque at low speeds. The figures given are general guidelines, and final determination is often according to the skill and experience of the machinist, on a particular machine, on given materials, and is a matter of "feel" (as well as sight, sound, and smell).
                    http://pauleschoen.com/pix/PM08_P76_P54.png
                    Paul , P S Technology, Inc. and MrTibbs
                    USA Maryland 21030

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                    • #11
                      Dan and Paul

                      Looks like I came to the RIGHT place!
                      I now have something to go by while the senses, feel,sight, sound, and smell will help guide me.

                      I think I'll hang around here and see what I can learn.
                      The year I was going to welding school in the 80's the machine shop was across the hall from the classroom and welding shop.
                      If it hadn't been a 2 year course I'd probably taken machine shop. For many years I think about wishing I'd taken that course and kicking my but for not.
                      Thanks again!!
                      Definition: Boat, a hole in the water you throw money into!

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                      • #12
                        Yes that is good advice that is here, the way I manage my feeds and speeds is more by feel and guess work. With the type of lathe you are using the spindle speed is easy to set, but the feeds are more difficult because of the use of feed gears. I would find a feed rate that gives you the surface finish I wanted or the best that your machine will give, and use it 90% of the time then just experiment with speeds.

                        Because you have a light lathe you will take light cuts so a feed rate that is a finish rate for a larger machine will work the best. I always at home err on the slower side just because it is more forgiving and the tooling doesn't wear as much. The small lathes are a different animal than a larger one, but after you learn what your machine will do you will be able to do good work with it.

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