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  • Home shop fashion

    Ok, very important question here. What are you guys wearing for pants and shirts when working out in the shop?

    I've had a home shop in one form or another for the past 16 years and have always worn just plain old blue jeans, Lee jeans or Levis etc. However, for the first time I'm considering switching to something else that may be more comfortable and longer lasting. My Lee jeans seem to always rip out just above the knee or tear near the belt loops.

    So, I was considering maybe Car-hart. They have this one style of pants that has an extra layer of denim riveted on the front of the jeans. This would seem to be tougher, though heavier and hotter.

    Or, maybe the Dickie's work pants. I don't know what these are made out of, but it's not denim. You know what I'm talking about, the dark blue uniform type pants. I call them "gas station pants" because my father wore them years ago when he owned a Chevron station. I wonder how well these would work? They look like they may be kind of hot in the summer time? The other thing I noticed about these pants is the belt loops are very small. They look like they were designed for a 1.25 or 1" belt. I usually prefer to wear a 1.5 belt.

    While were on the subject. Anybody wear suspenders? I'm a belt guy, but do have a pair of suspenders that hook under the belt itself instead of on the pants.

    How about shirts? I have been wearing print t-shirts but they don't last very long and quickly become dirty. I wonder if some "gas station shirts" would be more soil resistant and longer lasting?

    Wayne

  • #2
    Shirts? What shirts?
    Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

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    • #3
      Evan,
      You ain't workin' your machines hard enough or you have leather skin! What happens when you stand in the spray of hot blue curlycue chips?
      Rich

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      • #4
        Pretty hard for my old SB9 to spray steel chips. It was a bit uncomfortable the other day when it was spitting hot teeny chips of bronze. They get caught in my beard.
        Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

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        • #5
          I wonder, Evan must be kin to my pup..

          I was welding on "the Frame" and lost a big old slag ball to the floor, I smelled something like hair, looked down to see my pup smacking the red stuff with his paws and biting at it.

          He is kinda crazy, probably like evan running machines without a shirt.

          I get excited when the bibs on my overalls catch chips/or slag and they stop on my rotundus maximus. (belly). when I move they poke me.

          I wear a denium bar-be-que apron, cost $7.. and saved probably $100 in clothes.. I have a leather apron to cast with, I have a Silicone layer under that leather (600+ degrees protection)
          My pants used to wear out on the knees, then I leaned not to spend so much time on my knees begging for more tools..

          David

          [This message has been edited by ibewgypsie (edited 06-15-2004).]

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          • #6
            "He is kinda crazy, probably like evan running machines without a shirt."

            And if I remember correctly, there was a picture posted that made Evan look like he could run a machine without his hands too.

            Did we ever figure out for sure how he was controlling that machine? I know there was some speculation.

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            • #7
              Real men run big powerful machine tools to maximum capacity naked and stand unprotected in the blizzard of hot chips.

              I aint one of them. Wear clothes made of natural fibers around machinery. Hot chips and welding sparks won't instantly melt through them.

              Square-back bib overalls are traditional for the machine and bench hands and full cuvvies for dirty work. Blue cotton chambray shifts lightly starched are wonderfully comfortable in hot weather when the chips are flying. I weat cotton flannel shirts in the wintertime. I mostly wore Navy dungaree jeans at work but then I was a clever worker and wore an apron to keep my front clean.

              Dirty ragged clothes are out of fashion not to mention foolish in a working shop. If you have holes in them OK but neatly patch them. Your clothes are your first line of defense against flying chips so make sure they are an effecive barrier.

              Hats are a good idea too - safety hats for overhead hazards; soft brimmed hats for flying chips. I have iron control but I still flinch when I get a hot chip down the back of my neck. I found an old fireman's hat years ago I kept for when I was boring shaft seal castings and the jaws were lobbing 3 oz cask K monel chips 20 feet in the air.

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              • #8
                So what's a square back overall?

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                • #9
                  What I want to know, is how many regularly wear a full face shield when machining.
                  (Now be honest.)

                  I don't have one, but have considered it.

                  As for attire, I'm usually in shorts and a T-shirt down here in the Alabama summer. Having hairy arms and legs helps to hold the hot chips away from the skin. But I do wear low-quarter leather work shoes and socks. I'll put on more if I expect to do much
                  welding.

                  I have some of the Carhart pants which I wear in cooler weather. They are great. If you rip or tear them, then you're just too tough for any clothing. Mine aren't double layer, but I can't see where that's needed, as tough as their fabric is.
                  Lynn (Huntsville, AL)

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                  • #10
                    Don't take but one pair of tennis shoes with poly-propylene in them to remind you of footwear while welding..

                    I had flames up to my knees.. I kicked faster than I ever did IN karate class.

                    David

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                    • #11
                      <font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by ibewgypsie:
                      Don't take but one pair of tennis shoes with poly-propylene in them to remind you of footwear while welding..

                      I had flames up to my knees.. I kicked faster than I ever did IN karate class.

                      David
                      </font>

                      Brilliant,
                      ROTFLMAO
                      I can just imagine that, IBEW break dancing all over the floor with his spuds on fire.
                      Then being chased around by his pooch trying to snap his bollocks off.

                      Gotta be a classic.
                      .

                      Sir John , Earl of Bligeport & Sudspumpwater. MBE [ Motor Bike Engineer ] Nottingham England.



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                      • #12
                        Evans machining cloths will be a little more in a couple of weeks. He has the grandsons coming for two to three weeks. (for how ever long we can handle 2 eleven year olds) He is not going to be showing pics like he did last year. You guys let him know all the things he needed to improve.

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                        • #13
                          Yes dear....
                          Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

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                          • #14
                            Snigger..................
                            .

                            Sir John , Earl of Bligeport & Sudspumpwater. MBE [ Motor Bike Engineer ] Nottingham England.



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                            • #15
                              I'm reminded of a time when a friend and I were out rattling around, and he decided to stop by another friend's place. He pulled off the road and headed down a gravel road going into the woods. After about a hundred yards, he stopped and went over to some sort of electrical pedestal and entered some kind of combination, then returned to the truck and told me it was a nudist colony and you had to have the combination or the electronic eye would announce you as an intruder. I didn't expect much nudity, as it was late December.

                              Well, we finally found the guy in his shed doing the work he did to supplement his meager income, i.e. sawing points on bluetop grading stakes on his bandsaw, naked as a jaybird and oblivious to all the sawdust, chips and splinters that were flying around.
                              Lynn S.

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