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  • Insert drill in manual lathe

    Has any one tried an insert drill in a manual lathe. I could hold it with boring bar holder or in tail stock. I'm talking about the ones that take two inserts and leave a flat-ish hole bottem not the spade drill kind. Seams like the cnc lathes that use them are 20+HP and super ridged. Will it chatter like hell in a manual? drill like this http://www.ebay.com/itm/NICE-SBM-COO...#ht_189wt_1124

  • #2
    Originally posted by jeremy13 View Post
    Has any one tried an insert drill in a manual lathe. I could hold it with boring bar holder or in tail stock. I'm talking about the ones that take two inserts and leave a flat-ish hole bottem not the spade drill kind. Seams like the cnc lathes that use them are 20+HP and super ridged. Will it chatter like hell in a manual? drill like this http://www.ebay.com/itm/NICE-SBM-COO...#ht_189wt_1124
    1 1/4" shank, I guess you'll need a pretty beefy tailstock for that, and perhaps a lathe chuck mounted to an arbor to hold it.
    I don't think any lathe with a MT2 tailstock would have the guts to hold it without stressing something.

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    • #3
      I've been wondering about this myself.
      I just need one more tool,just one!

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      • #4
        It takes a lot of power to drive them and they must have coolant, should be a couple of small in the shank. Coolant is used as much to blow the chips out as to cool. I think I'd put it back in the drawer.

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        • #5
          I have a 7 1/2HP lathe with a MT4 tailstock. And i have coolent but not that much psi. I have a project that requires a lot of 1.75"flat bottem holes .75 deep. I was planning on cleen up with boring bar but just wanted to bust it out faster.

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          • #6
            I have used them in a manual tailstock on a LeBlond TapeTurn Regal ( a few years ago...). About that same horsepower. Might want to start a short pilot and then be ready to crank it steady the whole way down. You want to make sure you have enough coolant flow and may want to make a blast shield to keep from getting soaked, especially at the start. An auxiliary pump might be appropriate.

            Another thought is to use an end mill in the normal tool holder - I would assume an Aloris or similar. Slightly smaller than the finished hole, say 1.5" and then move out to finish to diameter. What is the tolerance?

            You might want to look into getting a second drill and grinding it for a flat bottom. Drill it with the standard drill and then swap in the flat bottom to finish.

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            • #7
              Not sure if this could be an option for you:

              http://tool.wttool.com/tools/Apt%20Multi-tool

              APT multi tool

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              • #8
                With 7-1/2 HP and 4MT that drill will work fine. I can run a 2" one like that in my 3HP R8 bridgeport type mill, drillling alum. from solid. Coolant will help a lot but it doesn't need to be high pressure, especially for a shallow hole.

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                • #9
                  That's a copy of the original Valenite Val-U-Dex drills. I had a ط1-1/2" one just like it and tried it in 1018 steel, holding just as you suggested in a boring bar holder. My lathe is a 1974 Victor 1640, D1-6 spindle and 5HP motor. The toolpost is a Dorian SD40/CA size.

                  At .004" a rev power feed, it twisted the toolpost on it's big post. I was able to get a 1-1/2" deep hole with hand feed, but it was a struggle. I've used those drills for years on CNC lathes without any problems, that's why I didn't have any fears about trying it on the manual lathe.

                  It simply didn't work well at all.

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                  • #10
                    I've done it. Plenty of coolant and steady feed (faster feed rate than you might think).

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                    • #11
                      Just use a normal drill to get close to the right size and depth, than clean up the bottom with a boring bar.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by jeremy13 View Post
                        I have a 7 1/2HP lathe with a MT4 tailstock. And i have coolent but not that much psi. I have a project that requires a lot of 1.75"flat bottem holes .75 deep. I was planning on cleen up with boring bar but just wanted to bust it out faster.
                        Have you tried a flat bottom spade drill?
                        I just need one more tool,just one!

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                        • #13
                          No I haven't tried a flat bottom spade drill. I do have a homemade holder for spade drills. I need to duy what ever I'm going to use. I'm using a drill now and flatining the bottom with a boring bar. Right now I have 10 to do but this could turn in to 100. The finished hole is 1.76"W X .75"D and threaded 12tpi. With a .812" threw hole in the center.

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                          • #14
                            This tool with the right inserts (SD532P 3P or SD532P CM) would work GREAT for a short hole like that. If you have the ط13/16" through hole done first, it will take very little cutting pressure to plunge the .75" depth. And it will happen FAST!

                            I have a 1" diameter version of this and it's my go-to tool for short holes and counterbores. You can plunge on-center, then as long as you have the outboard insert level with the X axis, just step over to open up the hole.

                            http://www.ebay.com/itm/USED-VALENIT...item4d308e2d18

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                            • #15
                              Ok, why use a drill at all? Especially if the hole is only 3/4" deep?

                              Drill the 13/16" through hole and then plunge your boring bar to make the 1 3/4" counterbore.

                              With a little practice, you should be able to plunge a tpg insert straight in and do that in one pass, 2 if the diameter tolerances are close.

                              Dave

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