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  • oldtiffie
    replied
    Odd that.

    I've had Marv Klotz's utilities running very well under the"Run" command (limited scope DOS emulator) from ZP to W7 - never a problem.

    It is important that you expand the ZIP files in the same directory ("folder"?) as the expanded executables (mainly but not only *.exe).

    Searching for the executable as well as correct file names is important too.

    Once you get to use and know Marv's utilities they are very good indeed.

    I haven't used them for a while now and would need to "brush up" my commands etc.
    Last edited by oldtiffie; 08-31-2015, 07:10 AM.

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  • PStechPaul
    replied
    The "Run" command does not work for MSDOS executables, at least not in Win8.0. It may work on XP, probably Win98, and certainly Win95 in MSDOS mode. DOSBOX is a very useful utility but it takes some getting used to. I have used it under Win7 and Vista and XP, but not Win8.

    Here may be another way (at least for XP):
    http://www.pcmag.com/article2/0,2817,1161515,00.asp

    or
    http://www.tomshardware.com/answers/...m-windows.html

    http://sourceforge.net/projects/vdos/
    Last edited by PStechPaul; 08-29-2015, 12:23 AM. Reason: links

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  • Paul Alciatore
    replied
    Marv, pardon my slip. I did try it under the DOS window, but still ran into the 64 bit incompatibility thing. I did not know about the DOS Box program. It runs great there. And yes, I did not read you introduction. Bad me!

    Just a suggestion, but you might format it a bit better, like with some bold headings like: "How to run these Programs" and "Windows Compatibility".

    I guess if I want to see how it works, I will have to brush up on C and study the source code.



    Originally posted by mklotz View Post
    I'm not selling anything (everything on my site is free for the taking) so I really don't care if they're too lazy to read the material presented. I get one or two emails a week asking why the programs won't run on newer systems. I long ago gave up answering them.

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  • oldtiffie
    replied
    Originally posted by Richard P Wilson View Post

    Following the posts above, it strikes me that its quicker to just use a set of translation gears and the method shown in the video than mess around with exotic programmes.
    Originally posted by John Stevenson

    Funnily enough I have said the same thing a few times in this thread.
    +1 for both.

    Leave a comment:


  • oldtiffie
    replied

    Originally Posted by RichR

    I suppose you could highlight the Dosbox section in red to lead people to it, but you can't make them read.
    Originally posted by mklotz View Post

    I'm not selling anything (everything on my site is free for the taking) so I really don't care if they're too lazy to read the material presented. I get one or two emails a week asking why the programs won't run on newer systems. I long ago gave up answering them.
    I am firmly with Marv Klotz on this.

    This will among a host of other similar things will (re?)establish hsi credibility in machining generally and in his involvement in HSM work in this instance in particular:

    http://www.schsm.org/html/marv_klotz.html

    Here is the section on his utilities that he refers to:



    Introduction to the Software [Goto Index]

    *** NOTA BENE ***: If you're too lazy to read this introduction, at least read the last four paragraphs so I don't have to waste my time answering questions already answered here. These heritage DOS programs will not run directly on the newer 64 bit operating systems. All is not lost however. Download and install the free program DosBox, http://www.dosbox.com and you'll be able to run heritage programs on your 64 bit system.

    A collection of home shop, mathematical and miscellaneous utility freeware. Almost all the programs written by me are written in C and source code is included in the zip files - for submitted software, source code availability is at author's discretion. Programs run under DOS (I don't do windows) - although I expect most will run in a windows DOS window (recent feedback from a number of users confirms this assertion).

    For the benefit of web novices, one can download the zip file by clicking on its name in the tables below. Once downloaded to your disk, unzip the file using PKUNZIP, which can be obtained from the good folks at PKWARE

    Unzip the zip file in a newly created subdirectory on your hard disk. You will find, at the minimum, two files. The file with a "C" extension is the source code. Unless you're into programming, you can ignore it (even delete it if short of hard disk real estate). The file with the "EXE" extension is the program. Run it by typing its name (without the extension) at the DOS prompt. If the program requires any auxiliary files (e.g. DRILL.EXE expects to find DRILL.DAT) it expects to find them in the default directory, so make your newly created subdirectory the default before attempting to execute the program. Many of the programs have built-in default values for the user inputs. Running the program using these defaults will give you a good idea of how it works. Naturally, the defaults can be overridden by user input.

    I haven't had time to write extensive documentation for some of the programs. If the zip file doesn't contain a documentation file ("TXT" extension), the program itself contains (I hope) enough run-time hints so that a user familiar with the subject should be able to get the answer he needs. (Hey, at the price I'm charging, a little effort on the part of the user is assumed!) If serious confusion is reported to me, I'll make an attempt to provide clarification in a future documentation file.

    Lest I bore more accomplished users with needless instruction, I've written a NOTES file which contains answers to questions I've received in the past. Let me know if you want any useful hints added to this file.

    A number of DOS-challenged users of my programs have written to complain that when the program terminates, Windoze, in another one of its mis-guided attempts to think for the user, closes the window before they can inspect the answers generated by the program. Dave Wood has spent some time working out how to keep Micro$oft's abortion from trying to outthink the user. He writes:

    In Explorer, right-click on the .exe program name. Select "Properties". Select the "Program" tab. At the bottom of this dialog is a single check-box "Close on exit". Un-check this box. At the bottom of the dialog click on "Apply," then "OK".

    His remarks are specific to XP but I expect they are applicable to other flavors of MS so-called operating systems.

    Also, Anthony Nagy writes, "I discovered that if you create and use a shortcut to run the program it will run under Windows and not terminate. I run Windows 2000. This may also work with your other programs and other versions of Windows."
    Here is his file of utilities:

    http://www.myvirtualnetwork.com/mklotz/

    The "Run" command utility in the Windows start-up panel will do all that DOS is required to do.

    "Run" is a Windows utility run within Windows as a DOS emulator. It is less than a full DOS set of commands but works very well with Marv Klotz' utilities.

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  • Baz
    replied
    My company locked down laptop won't run Marv's .exe files but for some reason will run the ratio calculator off Duncan's site under Hobber calculator. This may help some others.

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  • mklotz
    replied
    Originally posted by Richard P Wilson View Post
    Following the posts above, it strikes me that its quicker to just use a set of translation gears and the method shown in the video than mess around with exotic programmes.
    When Artful Bodger introduced the subject (post #18) he said, "There is another way although it has little to recommend it." I agree with that comment but, since the subject was under discussion, felt it appropriate to mention my program for the benefit of people who might want to try it. Feel free to ignore what I wrote.

    My program is hardly "exotic"; in fact the approach it uses is dead simple. If you're referring to DOSbox, it is a complex bit of code but since it provides a means of running heritage DOS programs on newer systems it has value far beyond running my machining programs. A lot of people wrote a lot of valuable code under DOS and losing it would be a real tragedy.

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  • John Stevenson
    replied
    Funnily enough I have said the same thing a few times in this thread.

    Leave a comment:


  • Richard P Wilson
    replied
    Following the posts above, it strikes me that its quicker to just use a set of translation gears and the method shown in the video than mess around with exotic programmes.

    Leave a comment:


  • oldtiffie
    replied
    Originally posted by Dave C View Post
    I spent half an afternoon trying to get Dosbox to run on my 64 bit Win 7 laptop. Finally gave up and uninstalled it.
    Its all there and wouks as intended - but a small knowledge of DOS commands etc. is pretty well necessary.

    I have Win8 and it works just fine.

    Install it from Marv's site and expand the ZIP files into a base directory/folder.

    Use the "Run" command in the opening Windows (at the far left panel) and enter your DOS exe file and then follow the instructions and commands.

    Leave a comment:


  • Spin Doctor
    replied
    Originally posted by small.planes View Post
    My CVA has a magic lever on the headstock - single tooth dog clutch.
    I nearly always leave the half nuts engaged and throw the leadscrew out of gear. Works on metric and imperial, and feeds the carriage back without stopping the lathe.

    Dave
    True, but only if you have a Reversing Single Tooth Dog Clutch. Between the recent articles in HSM and Marvin Cleve's book on Screwcutting In The Lathe such a device should be on the TO DO List of anyone with a home shop
    Last edited by Spin Doctor; 08-27-2015, 09:45 PM. Reason: grammer

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  • PStechPaul
    replied
    It might be better to use JavaScript so that the applications can be run using a browser. The HTML with the script can be downloaded to a local file so it can be used when internet access is not available. Thanks for making these utilities open source.

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  • mklotz
    replied
    I should point out that, if you're unhappy with my C programs written to run under DOS, you're welcome to port them to your language and platform of choice. All of the programs written by me, which is most of them, have the source code included in the downloadable zip file so you can easily see the relevant mathematics.

    I wrote them to solve machining problems I encountered and decided to pass them along gratis to others who might find them useful. I've moved along to other things now and so have no interest in supporting them as would be expected if I charged for them.

    A number (~6) of people have sought permission to port them and set up a (free) site where the rewritten programs could be downloaded. I've always granted permission and encouraged their efforts but, to date, not a single one has followed through on his proposal.

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  • John Stevenson
    replied
    Originally posted by Richard P Wilson View Post
    Sorry, don't understand how that works.
    He forgot to mention the Mason's handshake.......................

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  • Richard P Wilson
    replied
    Originally posted by The Artful Bodger View Post
    I have an old book on 'workshop practice' which shows how to cut non-standard threads by offsetting the tail stock, turning between centres and using the taper attachment.
    Sorry, don't understand how that works.

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