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Atlas 618 treadmill motor conversion

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  • Atlas 618 treadmill motor conversion

    With some amount of trepidation here's how I added a DC treadmill motor to my Atlas 618 lathe. The treadmill was a kerb find that I dragged back (literally) from around the corner which was then immediately appropriated by the wife. After it nearly spat her off she told me I could have it back and the conversion started.

    Nothing wrong with the 1/4hp (1/3?) reversible motor on there, I just wanted variable speed and a tach. Plus this was a great way to learn how to do it for my drill press where I really need variable speed as it's such a pain to change speed with the low speed pulley.

    Anyway, first up was adding a fan to the motor to replace the flywheel


    Added a shroud and drilled the flange around the motor to reduce back pressure


    Lick of paint and a pulley bored to fit the motor spindle


    The driver board, an MC68 which I think is a later variant of the more common MC60 board. Cutting the R19/ RPS3 resistor (connected to the wiper in the speed control rheostat) removes the "turn speed to 0 before starting" feature so the motor restarts at the same speed as when you stopped it

  • #2
    front panel with tach display (off eBay), speed control knob, reversing switch and illuminated on/off switch


    reverse


    Wired up. Using a BUD box off Amazon, which the drive just fits into. I used Lexan for the front so I could see the status lights on the driver board. Right angled spade connectors would have really helped here.


    Tach pickup. I need to make a more permanent mount, but this works for now

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    • #3
      It runs! Backwards! Doh! (I knew that was wire I bolted instead of crimped the motor wires ) This is the lowest speed in the lowest non-back gear (back gear lowers it to 10-20rpm, but the tach only seems to read down to 30 at the mo')


      Highest speed in the lowest gear


      Close up of the motor mounted


      Haven't had a chance to use it yet as I have to get stuff ready for the start of semester, but I have a project lined up where I'll get a chance to try it out. Need to add a larger front roller to my trolley jack to increase the height so I can get my cars wheels off the ground!

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      • #4
        Good job; gotta love making stuff from other people's throwaways! Great post & pics. Just what we need more of here.

        (Not even gonna harass you about the exposed motor leads...I know you're gonna tidy that up.)
        Milton

        "Accuracy is the sum total of your compensating mistakes."

        "The thing I hate about an argument is that it always interrupts a discussion." G. K. Chesterton

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        • #5
          thanks, much appreciated! It was funny to find out why they threw it away too. Well, for me at least, Ingrid wasn't laughing.

          Good reminder about the leads, I was going to wrap them after testing motor direction. Once I swap them over I'll probably just shrink wrap them - that'll be easy enough to cut off when we move.

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          • #6
            You might want to consider adding a tube around the motor to keep the airflow directed along its length. I think this may become particularly
            important when running at lower RPMs and also when the fan is sucking air as opposed to blowing it along the motors length.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by mattthemuppet View Post
              It runs! Backwards! Doh!
              The CW rotation on the plate is usually because of a threaded flywheel, can be handy to know which way to turn the flywheel of in the case of a L.H. thread.!!
              Max.

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              • #8
                Looks like there may be room to turn the motor aroung & tuck it behind the lathe?
                "Let me recommend the best medicine in the
                world: a long journey, at a mild season, through a pleasant
                country, in easy stages."
                ~ James Madison

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by flylo View Post
                  Looks like there may be room to turn the motor aroung & tuck it behind the lathe?
                  ...& then install a 12vdc server fan on the back so the motor runs cool at low speed/high load. Fax me $20 & I'll show you how to make a nifty custom fit heat-shrunk plastic duct for it.
                  Milton

                  "Accuracy is the sum total of your compensating mistakes."

                  "The thing I hate about an argument is that it always interrupts a discussion." G. K. Chesterton

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by RichR View Post
                    You might want to consider adding a tube around the motor to keep the airflow directed along its length. I think this may become particularly
                    important when running at lower RPMs and also when the fan is sucking air as opposed to blowing it along the motors length.
                    good idea, although I'll see how hot it gets in use first. The fan blows a good amount of air at low speeds as it's optimised for low speed low noise (Yate Loon DSL120) and blows a complete storm at 4000rpm Most likely I'll still use the pulleys and back gear to use the motor within a 25-75% band, which should keep it happy.

                    Originally posted by MaxHeadRoom View Post
                    The CW rotation on the plate is usually because of a threaded flywheel, can be handy to know which way to turn the flywheel of in the case of a L.H. thread.!!
                    Max.
                    yes indeed and it came off pretty easily. The main reason for removing it was to make it simpler to mount a pulley, although then I had to complication of adding a fan.. Probably didn't save myself any time, but hey ho! Oh, and the reason for it running backwards was because I was a dufus and wired up the forward/ reverse switch wrong. I could just swap the leads on the driver board, but I don't want to open it up, so I'll just swap the motor leads instead (which will allow me to put heatshrink on which will look better than tape)

                    Originally posted by flylo View Post
                    Looks like there may be room to turn the motor aroung & tuck it behind the lathe?
                    there is and that was the original plan but I didn't take into account which way the fan had to rotate to push air. I didn't want it to suck air (which is pretty inefficient with any kind of obstruction) so I couldn't turn the fan around on the shaft and with the fan rotating CW (ie. backwards) it didn't really do much at all. So I ended up just mounting the motor the other way. I still needed that space to open the gear cover, so it doesn't really make that much difference space wise.

                    Originally posted by DICKEYBIRD View Post
                    ...& then install a 12vdc server fan on the back so the motor runs cool at low speed/high load. Fax me $20 & I'll show you how to make a nifty custom fit heat-shrunk plastic duct for it.
                    neat, remember seeing that. The fan was originally rated at 25 or 30SFM (? that the right unit?) at 1200rpm and is extraordinarily quiet at that speed, so that equates to about 25-30% of the rated motor speed. Should be okay in general use, but we'll see. It's enough to blow the cobwebs off the light above it at 4000rpm!
                    Last edited by mattthemuppet; 08-27-2015, 07:19 PM.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Thanks a bunch for posting a fix for the "having to return it to zero speed" problem. You have no idea how that
                      problem has plagued experimenters. That might be applicable for other boards too.
                      John Titor, when are you.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Mike Amick View Post
                        Thanks a bunch for posting a fix for the "having to return it to zero speed" problem. You have no idea how that
                        problem has plagued experimenters. That might be applicable for other boards too.
                        you're welcome Mike, but I can't take credit for it - I found a reference to the cutting the R19 resistor in my internet trawlings on MC60 boards and gave it a shot! I have another motor that someone gave me with an older MC40 board and you can figure out which resistor to cut - it's the one directly connected to the pad that the center wiper wire of the rheostat connects to. Can't remember the no., though if you shine a light at the back of the board you can see the large pad that they share. Makes sense too as a similar mod is to have the motor on/off switch wired to break the wiper wire - does the same thing.

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                        • #13
                          Very cool! Anyone see you dragging the treadmill down the road? lol

                          Just a fyi, the abbreviation for forward is "fwd" normally.
                          Andy

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by vpt View Post
                            Very cool! Anyone see you dragging the treadmill down the road? lol

                            Just a fyi, the abbreviation for forward is "fwd" normally.
                            thanks! I'm sure the whole neighbourhood saw me, it took me bloody long enough

                            bah, now you tell me about fwd Nevermind, I have another one to do so I'll do it right on that one..

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by vpt View Post
                              Very cool! Anyone see you dragging the treadmill down the road? lol

                              Just a fyi, the abbreviation for forward is "fwd" normally.
                              That's funny! When I first saw that I thought it was a turco boost switch for when you need more power. The for For Rev switch!

                              I used ConSew 3/4hp commercial sewing machine motors for small lathes. Forward/Reverse, variable speed & a brake if you want it.

                              Nice job!
                              "Let me recommend the best medicine in the
                              world: a long journey, at a mild season, through a pleasant
                              country, in easy stages."
                              ~ James Madison

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