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  • Chips on the floor

    What do you guys do about those dang chips? I know this has probably been discussed, and cussed, but what's the best way to deal with them? May sound like a silly question but the brooms I have used are a royal PITA with chips, especially the stringy ones clogging the darn thing and just getting spread around. What's the best method? A magnet maybe? A different kind of broom? I have a shop vac that I use more than anything else but while that does a really good job it's just too dang slow, seems I spend way too much time cleaning up my mess anymore. So what does everyone use?


    Truth be known the problem is really my two Himalayan cats that live in my shop, I think a heck of lot of these little critters and I worry about sharp slivers. I need a really good and quick system to be sure and get this concrete (painted) floor free of chips and slivers whenever I finish for the day and bring them back into the area.

  • #2
    sorry replyd in wrong post
    Last edited by spinningwheels; 09-02-2015, 08:28 PM.

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    • #3
      Really about the best you can do is refine your technique with the broom! For the long stringy stuff, I just push it together with the dust pan (a snow shovel works great too) and pick it up as a handful. After that the broom works as long as i 'whisk' with short strokes. The chips & swarf are an integral part of the deal.

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      • #4
        I think a heavy shop vac may be needed, brushing first to loosen the hot ones that stick to the paint on the floor, I've tried most brooms, including stainless steel, none really get the stuff up as wel as suction
        You don't want brass needles in poor ol puss, cat boots may be needed!
        Mark

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        • #5
          If they are mostly steel,there was a write up in an old issue of HSM or PM where the author had used a 12vdc automotive AC clutch magnet mounted to a conduit handle with a 12x120 volt power supply.
          I just need one more tool,just one!

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          • #6
            I usually use a push broom but a regular household straw broom will have less tendency to make the chips jump about. I use a car snow brush to push them into the dustpan. You can clean them with a magnet if you're turning ferrous metals.

            I can also recommend a stint in the US Army. You'll get all the experience you need.

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            • #7
              I have just started to use the vacuum it sits by the lathe or mill it's good for the small chips. spirals need the old brush and pan

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              • #8
                Wierd has it right. I built one when the article was published, probably 12-15 years ago. I used a cordless drill battery for mine.

                The article was called "Zappo the swarf lifter, by Terry Sexton. I think. I don't remember which rag it was in, however.

                TC

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                • #9
                  For ferrous chips Arceurotrade sell some good "Swarf Sticks"



                  And there's a home made version of the above Arceuro type in described in Model Engineers' Workshop Magazine No. 172 in this downloadable article:
                  A SWARF STICK
                  David Haythornthwaite discovers better ways of removing swarf.


                  I made one it was cheap <£5 and works very well.

                  Paul

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                  • #10
                    I did a variation on that. I found a pancake shaped magnet on a handle. Rather than have chips just sucked to the magnet and then having to scrape them off, I found some PVC fittings, basically a straight sleeve and a couple thin pipe covers. The handle now is attached to the sleeve, the magnet is loose inside and normally rests on the bottom cover. A handle rod attached to the magnet extends through the top cover. So now I wand the floor till the bottom is fully covered, hold it over the bin and pull the handle to lift the magnet inside and drop the chips. The Swarf Stick is the same idea with different hardware.
                    .
                    "People will occasionally stumble over the truth, but most of the time they will pick themselves up and carry on" : Winston Churchill

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                    • #11
                      Turn a plastic bag inside out and put a large magnet inside. Drag it around the floor allow chips to attach to the inside (which is now the outside) of the bag. When you've got most of them attached to the magnet, turn the bag right side out again and remove the magnet. The chips are now captured in the bag.

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                      • #12
                        Good ideas...now to try and find an aluminum magnet for the other chips!
                        David Kaiser
                        “You can have peace. Or you can have freedom. Don't ever count on having both at once.”
                        ― Robert A. Heinlein

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                        • #13
                          We have all been here before....

                          http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net/thr...ighlight=broom
                          1601

                          Keep eye on ball.
                          Hashim Khan

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                          • #14
                            Once you get up the big chips you can use duct tape or maybe sticky fly strips to get the real tiny ones (and those that are non-magnetic).
                            http://pauleschoen.com/pix/PM08_P76_P54.png

                            Paul: www.peschoen.com
                            P S Technology, Inc. www.pstech-inc.com
                            and Muttley www.muttleydog.com

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                            • #15
                              That AC magnet sounds like a great idea and I actually have one of the darn things stashed away,,,,,,,somewhere, I will try and locate it tomorrow. The plastic bag trick is one of those "now why didn't I think of that" ideas, I have rectangular magnet about 1"x6" that I got from Harbor Freight that has a lifting ring on top and I have a roll of clear plastic wrap that I have been using similar to the bag trick but I usually get a lot of junk stuck to the magnet trying to get the wrap off, those bags will solve that problem!

                              Looks like a magnet in one form or another, or perhaps one of each version, is the answer and it should work quite well since nearly 99% of what I do involves steel or cast iron. I very rarely turn brass or aluminum and when I have in the past it has been on only a very small scale.

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