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Solvent for parts washer?

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  • stanger53
    replied
    I have a Harbor Freight self-standing washer that I removed the plastic water-based solvent pump from and installed a Little Giant pump like the Ford dealership has in their Safety-Kleen machines. Been using this setup for 35 years now.

    I use mineral spirits in the machine. I can get it pumped into my cans locally for about half what it costs at Lowes/Home Depot. It dries fast and clean, and until it gets pretty oily, doesn't leave any greasy residue like kerosene or diesel does.

    First I fill the parts washer with fresh mineral spirits. After several months (and I use this thing almost every day), it starts leaving an oily film on the parts after blowing off with compressed air. At that point, I keep a small container with about a half-gallon of fresh solvent near by to dunk and swish the parts in after cleaning in the machine. This removes the last oily film and lasts quite a while this way.

    When the "rinse" bucket starts to leave and oily film, it goes in the slop bucket where I clean the parts that have a lot of heavy grease on them, and also can let the caked-on parts soak for a while. These parts then get rinsed off in the machine, them dipped in the rinse.

    Using this method, I can go over a year on about 15 gallons of mineral spirits and wash tons of steering components with it. The spirits easily dissolves grease and oil, and leaves the parts dry and clean for blasting and painting.

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  • oxford
    replied
    Originally posted by A.K. Boomer View Post
    Another timely thread as im going through this same thought process --- my garage will only be heated when im working in there so I would think the simple green or purple power is out as it would freeze would it not?
    Yes, I would think it would freeze if it got cold enough. Depending upon how much insulation, how often you are out there and how cold it is outside you may be alright even not heating all the time. One thing you might want to look into though is something to heat the solvent tank with. With no full time heat whatever fluid you have in there gets awfully cold and keeping your hands in it washing parts is not really fun.

    Originally posted by A.K. Boomer View Post
    instead of my propane buddy heater that I do not like at all anymore due to it not venting
    I do not like being around any of the non-vented heaters either, they always get my head spinning.

    Leave a comment:


  • JoeLee
    replied
    Originally posted by projectnut View Post
    You might want to try Stoddard Solvent. It's much like kerosene, but has a much higher ignition point. Kerosene will ignite at 150*F while Stoddard Solvent requires 190*F for ignition. Personally I wouldn't use either in a basement shop especially if you have a gas water heater or furnace. I switched to Simple Green for the basement. It doesn't do quite as nice a job, but I don't have to worry about a big BOOM. If I get something really nasty I use the parts cleaner in the garage which still has Stoddard Solvent.

    Stoddard solvent used to be available from almost any oil distributor. I haven't bought any in years so I can't give you any specifics. I see it's still available through Grainger.
    This is what the replacement for the Kensol 30 is.

    JL..............

    Leave a comment:


  • ironmonger
    replied
    I use Gunk SC3 diluted with kerosene, Stoddard solvent or diesel as available. It allows the parts to be washed off with water after the solvent cleaning to remove the carry-out. Must be a kind of a soap as it were.

    Leave a comment:


  • RichR
    replied
    --- my garage will only be heated when im working in there so I would think the simple green or purple power is out as it would freeze would it not?
    Would adding some antifreeze be viable?

    Leave a comment:


  • A.K. Boomer
    replied
    Another timely thread as im going through this same thought process --- my garage will only be heated when im working in there so I would think the simple green or purple power is out as it would freeze would it not?

    yet im planning on putting in a very small NG heater instead of my propane buddy heater that I do not like at all anymore due to it not venting, so I do not want a flammable liquid in there,

    is safety kleens stuff non-flammable? is there other options?

    Leave a comment:


  • 10KPete
    replied
    Originally posted by projectnut View Post
    You might want to try Stoddard Solvent. It's much like kerosene, but has a much higher ignition point. Kerosene will ignite at 150*F while Stoddard Solvent requires 190*F for ignition. Personally I wouldn't use either in a basement shop especially if you have a gas water heater or furnace. I switched to Simple Green for the basement. It doesn't do quite as nice a job, but I don't have to worry about a big BOOM. If I get something really nasty I use the parts cleaner in the garage which still has Stoddard Solvent.

    Stoddard solvent used to be available from almost any oil distributor. I haven't bought any in years so I can't give you any specifics. I see it's still available through Grainger.
    In my previous post I neglected to say that the Chevron Solvent 365 is their name for Stoddard solvent. I'm sure
    Stoddard is available under many brand names.

    Pete

    Leave a comment:


  • projectnut
    replied
    You might want to try Stoddard Solvent. It's much like kerosene, but has a much higher ignition point. Kerosene will ignite at 150*F while Stoddard Solvent requires 190*F for ignition. Personally I wouldn't use either in a basement shop especially if you have a gas water heater or furnace. I switched to Simple Green for the basement. It doesn't do quite as nice a job, but I don't have to worry about a big BOOM. If I get something really nasty I use the parts cleaner in the garage which still has Stoddard Solvent.

    Stoddard solvent used to be available from almost any oil distributor. I haven't bought any in years so I can't give you any specifics. I see it's still available through Grainger.

    Leave a comment:


  • JoeLee
    replied
    The solvent I got with my parts washer was Kensol 30. It was sold by Kendall. It worked pretty well and didn't have too strong of an odor.
    I recently replaced what was left of it with something that is supposed to be the same stuff.

    JL.............

    Leave a comment:


  • GKman
    replied
    Originally posted by Frank K View Post
    Personally, I use Simple Green Industrial in my parts washer.
    Do you mean in a solution with water or straight?

    I got tired of messing with the pump, evaporation, and crud and simply use the parts washer as a sink and batch wash parts in a suitable container inside. Used Stanisol from a Standard oil station when I was a kid. Local oil distributor sells something similar, I take my own can, cash, no paperwork.

    Local garage switched to a hot water (detergent? lye?) giant dishwasher and gave up the solvent based because of expense. Must be a pain in the ass for small jobs or they don't get much cleaning.

    Leave a comment:


  • Noitoen
    replied
    I used a parts cleaner many years ago with a degreasing solvent from Castrol called Almarine Solvent 2. The pump was a regular washing machine drain pump mounted on the back of the splash guard and a check valve inside the drum. This valve was made from a regular shaft seal with a glass marble as a valve and this marble was about 3 mm bigger than the seal's shaft size. I never had any trouble with it. The splash guard would close the washing tray in case of fire since it was supported by a thermal fuse that would melt and help smother the flames.

    Leave a comment:


  • lakeside53
    replied
    Simple green is now a brand name... not a single product. Some are like "purple cleaners" (but colored green); other more like detergents. The PC cleaners are very good degreasers but take care with paint and aluminum if used in strong solution. You can scoop the oil off the surface (it rises in a few days) with a paper towel.

    Leave a comment:


  • tc429
    replied
    I love fantastik/409 for cleaning stuff...not as good at cutting grease as simplegreen, but it dont eat up auminum/copper/silver/plastics like simplegreen either...have a small ultrasonic cleaner with fantastik in it, works great

    Leave a comment:


  • 10KPete
    replied
    I installed a simple filter between the pump and nozzle/brush. A standard replaceable cartridge water filter about the
    size of two soda cans tall. Not an original idea. Came from a friend with an auto repair shop who didn't like washing
    out bearings with media containing particulate matter. I have the same problem with particulates. I don't care if the
    solvent gets oily as it keeps freshly washed parts from rusting so fast. When I need to paint the part I give it a final
    'rinse' with a spray bottle loaded with new solvent. Over the washer of course. Oh, and I use Chevron Solvent 365 which
    is basically de-odorized mineral spirits. Not something you want to breath or get on your skin a lot so I wear gloves
    and the washer is in a very well ventilated area.

    If I were to set up again or start over I'd just replace the solvent with an aqueous cleaner like Simple Green and leave
    in the filter. Just don't want to face cleaning out the bottom of the drum just yet.

    Pete

    Leave a comment:


  • mickeyf
    replied
    the kerosene stays cleaner for longer.
    Not to mention avoiding clogging up your pump.

    Leave a comment:

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