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Hex Die Crimp ?????

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  • Hex Die Crimp ?????

    I have some SMA connectors that I have to put on RG-174 coax. The ferrules require a hex type crimp. I don't have the crimping tool so I was going to make a small hex crimp die. It should be fairly easy to do. Mill the slot to the proper depth and width cut the angles on the sides and then cut the piece in half. When you put the two pieces together you have a hex hole, that's my crimp die.
    What I need to know is the proper size. The ferrules measure .158 on the OD. I found some crimping tools that have the size for crimping 174 and it's .128 for the die. The question is, is that measured between the flat sides or corner to corner. I'm guessing it's like measuring hex stock or if you were to draw it you would draw a .128 dia. circle and divide the sides x 6. I don't want to play hit and miss.

    JL................

  • #2
    Like this one ? if its what you're looking for I'd be happy to run the calipers over it.

    Regards,

    Steve.





    These crimpers have 3 hexes, they measure and are stamped .256", .319", and .213" across the flats.
    Last edited by rythmnbls; 09-15-2015, 08:24 PM. Reason: add hex sizes

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    • #4
      Cut a 6 side socket in half
      and weld it to some cheapy
      vise grips.

      -D
      DZER

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      • #5
        Originally posted by rythmnbls View Post
        Like this one ? if its what you're looking for I'd be happy to run the calipers over it.

        Regards,

        Steve.





        These crimpers have 3 hexes, they measure and are stamped .256", .319", and .213" across the flats.
        Those are it............ but I think they are all too big. Thanks for the offer.........

        JL...................

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        • #6
          Kings tools makes crimpers for just about anything.

          Rick

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          • #7
            I have a Contact East 4100 hex crimper set that does almost everything. Used it once in 25 years. lol

            The die for the 174 is "e" in my set, 0.128 measured across the flats.

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            • #8
              As above, .128 across the flats. Like Lakeside I have a pro set with dies for just about everything from .050 to .550 for all coax sizes. Now for the good news, crimpers are not real expensive and can be bought with one set of dies or as complete sets. I have done literially thousands of coas connectors and the one recomendation I make to ALL DIY people is to BUY A CRIMPER that is made for the sizes you need. A bad crimp WILL fail and cause no end of problems. A reasonable quality single size crimper should be about $90.00 or less. Remember crimp terminals have 2 crimps required: the center pin and the shield.

              Robin

              PS: .125 is a great size for RG174 shield, .0625 is good for most centers (check to be sure)
              Robin

              Happily working on my second million Gave up on the first

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              • #9
                Thanks guys. I thought that .128 was the proper size but wanted to make sure. .128 or .130 can't make much difference. I believe the pins are soldered since they have a small hole on the side.

                JL.......................

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                • #10
                  The small hole on the side is to inspect that the strands haven't retracted during the crimping operation.....
                  Igor

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                  • #11
                    It's called a "witness hole".

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                    • #12
                      I also have crimped tens of thousands of coax connectors and also strongly recommend the correct crimp tool and dies. It is not just a matter of size, but also pressure. Many crimp tools have an adjustment for this even when you are using the correct dies.

                      A proper electrical crimp needs to displace enough metal to cause spot welds between the wires and the connector metal, but not too much so as to break the wires. This is a difficult point to find without some destructive inspection. I have seen professional crimping tools where the wires could be pulled out of the crimp and others where they broke off at the least stress. These were illustrations of too little and too much pressure respectively. If you do not have those spot weld points inside the crimp, the oxygen in the air will get in there and cause corrosion. Then the connection fails over time. In short, you are playing "hit and miss" if you make your own tool.

                      As for that "witness hole" you can solder them using it. I have done them that way and there was never any problem. In fact, some connectors are made this way with soldering in mind: it is in the manufacturer's instructions. But you need to keep any excess solder from the outside of the pin as it will interfere with the proper assembly of the connector. I recommend dipping the wire in an electronic flux just prior to assembly if you are doing this.
                      Last edited by Paul Alciatore; 09-16-2015, 03:33 PM.
                      Paul A.
                      SE Texas

                      And if you look REAL close at an analog signal,
                      You will find that it has discrete steps.

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                      • #13
                        This thread takes me back down memory lane, the tool linked to in the photos was last used around 1995 and was used to terminate RG-58 cables for thin ethernet. Networking sure has changed since then.

                        Steve.

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                        • #14
                          in the '70s, crimp tools had a one way ratchet. no release. you got skin in there, squeeze until it releases. teach you not to get skin in there.

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                          • #15
                            If .128 is the size for the hex die I need then from what point to what point is this measured???? There are three possible choices.

                            How to calculate the dimensions of a hexagon from one given measurement, e.g., side length, height, diagonal length, area


                            JL.....................

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