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Why would this old Delco 1/4 hp motor weigh so much?

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  • Why would this old Delco 1/4 hp motor weigh so much?

    The way it was positioned maybe it's full of metal chips but it weighs over 40 lbs and still runs. Wondering why so heavy? Older technology?

  • #2
    In short a combination of overbuilt and underrated.
    I just need one more tool,just one!

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    • #3
      Overbuilt, yes. They built the housings and end bells out of cast iron. Totally unnecessary.

      Not overrated. They are no more powerful than a modern motor of same power.

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      • #4
        Bet they last a lot longer!
        mark costello-Low speed steel

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        • #5
          Lower temperature rated insulation; they had to be larger to run cooler.

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          • #6
            One other question.... what is the rpm?

            A slow speed motor will be heavier, because it has to have more torque. High rpm motors and generators can be small. I have seen a 200kW alternator that was just over a foot in diameter, and maybe 15 inches long. Ran at 60,000 rpm, which was the turbine speed, and produced 1kHz output.
            CNC machines only go through the motions.

            Ideas expressed may be mine, or from anyone else in the universe.
            Not responsible for clerical errors. Or those made by lay people either.
            Number formats and units may be chosen at random depending on what day it is.
            I reserve the right to use a number system with any integer base without prior notice.
            Generalizations are understood to be "often" true, but not true in every case.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by macona View Post
              Overbuilt, yes. They built the housings and end bells out of cast iron. Totally unnecessary.

              Not overrated. They are no more powerful than a modern motor of same power.
              No more powerful,but all that extra mass sinks a lot more heat no?
              I just need one more tool,just one!

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              • #8
                And less efficient... so more in for the same hp out.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by J Tiers View Post
                  One other question.... what is the rpm?
                  1730

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                  • #10
                    Ahh, They Was Really Built In Them Days!

                    George

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                    • #11
                      The laminations were different then, thicker from what I've seen, they hadn't figured out high silicon steels or rolling them, when they cast the steel into ingots they allowed it to cool, it would explode as the steel crystallised, they finally figured that if you kept the stuff red hot and rolled it right away down to the finished thickness it was ok, unfortunately there were no continuous casting machines only ingot casting so lighter motors and transformers had to wait for that process to be perfected.
                      Modern transformer laminations are made on continuous casters by what's called Hot connect casting, the steel is made, degassed, cast, hot rolled from the slab, cold rolled all in one go, requires a bit of Coordination to get it right, more than three ladles of high silicon is hard as it takes a lot of effort to get the steel chemistry right, very high silicon for static transformers, low sil for spinning kit, the high sil has no creep resistance so bursts in motors (at the moment)
                      It took years of disasters to get the stuff right, fun
                      Mark

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                      • #12
                        I have a 12" double grinder with a vacuum system with a 3HP 3 phase motor that's as big a todays 25HP. I bought it from a ols man who said it was his high school shop project. He did a fine job on it. I like the old motors that spin for 3 or 4 minutes after you switch them off & I really don't mind oil cups either.

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                        • #13
                          It seemed to run quite well when I looked at the lathe. I think I'll clean it up and use it on the lathe. I'm going to look for a wiring diagram. Right now it's still wired up the way it worked when I bought the lathe so that will work but I'd feel safer if I knew what each wire was for.

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