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space-crank velocipede brake

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  • space-crank velocipede brake

    This velocipede is on display in the Canterbury Museum in Christchurch, New Zealand. I admired the front brake. It is a space-mechanism, with two R-type rotation-only joints (one on the handle bar and one on the front fork, and a C-type cylindrical joint (which allows rotation and sliding) connecting these two.

    I got this joint nomenclature from my aging copy of Mechanisms, Linkages, and Mechanical Controls (1965), by Nicholas P. Chironis. This book makes no reference to this particular configuration, though. It probably does not have a name.

    Not a bell-crank. What would you call it?


    Allan Ostling

    Phoenix, Arizona

  • #2
    I'd call them levers.
    Location: Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada

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    • #3
      I would call it better not work too good or a trip over the bars is imminent...

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      • #4
        The bell crank is for the bell, missing on this specimen. This must be a handlebar crank!

        OK - final answer. Right Angle Cruise Control Lever.
        Kansas City area

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        • #5
          It's not a velocipede, it's an ordinary bicycle, sometimes called a penny farthing, maybe a dollar and dime over your side. A velocipede has no pedals, you have to sort of run while you sit astride it. Difficult if your feet are a yard above the ground. The brake allows one to dismount rapidly. On these particular machines it was called a Dontuchit or an Ohfu...........

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          • #6
            I just hope the Harley factory doesn't see it.
            Gene

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Daveb View Post
              It's not a velocipede, it's an ordinary bicycle, sometimes called a penny farthing, maybe a dollar and dime over your side. A velocipede has no pedals, you have to sort of run while you sit astride it. ...
              It fits this definition and illustration of a velocipede, in my Webster's 2nd edition.

              Were you thinking of a push bike?

              Allan Ostling

              Phoenix, Arizona

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              • #8
                Websters? I think that is an American dictionary?

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by The Artful Bodger View Post
                  Websters? I think that is an American dictionary?
                  American as apple pie.

                  I'll get out my Oxford English Dictionary. Not the condensed version, the full sockdolager OED. My edition is a rarity, being the full 20-volumes microscopically condensed into a single volume. It prints nine pages of the original onto a single page in a 3x3 array, like this:




                  I'm always looking for an excuse to use my Fujinon 60mm macro lens, so I'm glad you asked.





                  I could look up "penny farthing," but I'm still on jet lag and it's time for bed.
                  Last edited by aostling; 09-29-2015, 12:20 AM.
                  Allan Ostling

                  Phoenix, Arizona

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by topct View Post
                    I just hope the Harley factory doesn't see it.
                    LOL.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by A.K. Boomer View Post
                      I would call it better not work too good or a trip over the bars is imminent...
                      I'd say it's not really needed since on most of them the cranks are direct drive and function as brakes as well.


                      Originally posted by Daveb View Post
                      It's not a velocipede, it's an ordinary bicycle, sometimes called a penny farthing, maybe a dollar and dime over your side. A velocipede has no pedals, you have to sort of run while you sit astride it. Difficult if your feet are a yard above the ground. The brake allows one to dismount rapidly. On these particular machines it was called a Dontuchit or an Ohfu...........
                      Yep.
                      Modern bicycles were originally called 'safety' bicycles. Penny farthings were simply called bicycles until the modern design came about.

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                      • #12
                        I have actually seen a regular style road bike with all lever/rod linkages for front *and* back brakes. Both operated by pushing a spoon onto the wheel! Thing was being pedaled by some 80 year old guy who I assume had been riding it for 60~70 years :P
                        Play Brutal Nature, Black Moons free to play highly realistic voxel sandbox game.

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