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24'' Max Disc Grinder in Action

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  • 24'' Max Disc Grinder in Action

    Here is a video my my Max grinder in action ,really works well.

    https://youtu.be/_lHp5XjyNmI

  • #2
    Good job, bit of a beast, might need a spark bucket at the bottom of that chute!
    Mark

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    • #3
      That is a really bad location for a Nema 1 VFD! Metal dust getting in there is very likely to destroy it.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by garyhlucas View Post
        That is a really bad location for a Nema 1 VFD! Metal dust getting in there is very likely to destroy it.
        Yes I have not got around to getting mounted in a encloser.

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        • #5
          You don't mess around much, Mark.
          mark costello-Low speed steel

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          • #6
            Likin that. I have a 14 inch and love it..hate to use bench grinders anymore

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            • #7
              I want one. I want one! I WANT ONE!!!
              Paul A.
              SE Texas

              And if you look REAL close at an analog signal,
              You will find that it has discrete steps.

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              • #8
                That's awesome! What is grinding surface / grinding wheel made from? What is the motor power?

                Ian.

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                • #9
                  Looks like Si-C paper, wonder the grit.
                  ...lew...

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                  • #10
                    That's a sweet beast. Sounds very quiet.

                    How is the general wear/life of the abrasive on a large disc grinder like that vs. a belt grinder? It seems changing a belt would be much easier and quicker than changing the disc. How's the cost of the consumables compare? The types of grinding in this video could probably be done equally well on either type of machine. Though the force vector on the work would typically be different - down vs. horizontal. I'd guess the disc might generally be safer than a horizontal belt grinder.

                    The double sided grinder is also nice. What grit do you run on each side?

                    I can see where the disc has a much larger flat surface area, and can do things a narrow belt grinder could not. I'd like to have both.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by IanPendle View Post
                      That's awesome! What is grinding surface / grinding wheel made from? What is the motor power?

                      Ian.
                      Originally posted by Lew Hartswick View Post
                      Looks like Si-C paper, wonder the grit.
                      ...lew...
                      Originally posted by Glug View Post
                      That's a sweet beast. Sounds very quiet.

                      How is the general wear/life of the abrasive on a large disc grinder like that vs. a belt grinder? It seems changing a belt would be much easier and quicker than changing the disc. How's the cost of the consumables compare? The types of grinding in this video could probably be done equally well on either type of machine. Though the force vector on the work would typically be different - down vs. horizontal. I'd guess the disc might generally be safer than a horizontal belt grinder.

                      The double sided grinder is also nice. What grit do you run on each side?

                      I can see where the disc has a much larger flat surface area, and can do things a narrow belt grinder could not. I'd like to have both.
                      Sorry for delay on replying,harvest season on the farm.The discs are aluminum 5/8" thick on outer perimeter,3/4" half dia and15/16" thick where they bolt on to motor hub.The abrasive in video is 60 grit Zarconia with heavy polyester backing and opposite side 150 alumnim oxide with cotton backing.They are PSA (pressure sensitive adhesive) that you do not change quickly but seem to last a long time,$25.00 cdn. each.The motor is 3 hp 1155 rpm and runs very smooth and quiet, as jking stated after having this machine using a bench grinder is not my favourite tool.One feature that I did not think would be useful was dual tilting table,but tilting the table up lets the material self feed.I would highly recommend a grinder like this if can find one Max built them in 12",16",20",24" and 36" it is built like a tank and quality made USA machine of the old days.

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                      • #12
                        I have a 12" dual disk sander from the line shaft days. It has a tilting table on one side and a swinging table on the other side with a 4" cast iron ball for a counter balance. It would swing a part into the wheel. It has a micrometer dial also. I have 2 12" grinding wheels that I am thinking of mounting with a plate backup for sharpening large drill bits. Have to fab up an under neath motor drive.
                        mark costello-Low speed steel

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                        • #13
                          Awesome disc sander! Does the large handwheel raise the whole thing up on the 4 posts?

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                          • #14
                            I take it the second disc is for a busy workshop where it gets multiple use. I have to say this is a really stunning beast! err machine. I have not seen better. I personally would of course never need two discs in a single operator hobby shop. Now someone is going to say it is this way to allow for different grades of grit. A lot of people do indeed buy multiple graded discs. I follow the teachings of a really well educated man, who wrote that as far as he was concerned buying a lot of different grades, was simply another way to part us few ill thinking emperors in the Altogether (NUDE ) admiring their new ultra expensive although can't be seen clothes. It seems that when the disc gets up to speed there is no noticeable difference ,one grade to another, other than having to slow down and change very high numbered smaller grit discs more often .His advice, which I followed and still do was to buy a very low grade grit 60 or even less ,and as long as you keep your work piece constantly moving , and don't get crazy with pressure you will save money and a lot of bother and stress in the long run. I know there are a lot of people who will disagree with this. I am just saying what I do and it works fine for me and many others .No lecturing intended. Once again you guys are the best .(big Al ) Alistair
                            Please excuse my typing as I have a form of parkinsons disease

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Alistair Hosie View Post
                              It seems that when the disc gets up to speed there is no noticeable difference ,one grade to another, Alistair
                              Alister, if you can't see the difference in the finish between using 60 grit and 220 grit, you definitely need glasses . :-)
                              ...lew...

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