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possible gloatage?

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  • possible gloatage?

    Not sure if its a gloat price for everyone at $450, but certainly is around here where they seem to fetch $1000+.Do-All ml16 "contouring and filing machine", aka vertical bandsaw.
    3 phase, mechanical feed and bonus has arrived with a metal cutting band in. First problem is its too big to go through the workshop entrance standing upright, so I have to wait until the weekend so I can flip it onto its back and move it into the workshop that way but I am really looking forward to using it after years of a crappy underpowered ryobi bandsaw. Roll on the weekend to get it loaded in, its sat here in the bucket of the jcb in readyness.


  • #2
    Way to go!


    You suck!

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    • #3
      MrFluffy

      I used one just like that at work for years. It is a very good machine. Way to GO!

      Jim

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      • #4
        Heck yea. Blade welder too? not scrap money but I'd be very happy to find what you got there for myself at that price.

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        • #5
          Very nice.

          Just remember the blade welder is not intended for making your own blades from stock but for doing internal cuts where you cut the blade, pass it though a hole, and re-weld it with the welder. The welds tend not to last nearly as long as a factory weld.

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          • #6
            I would be all over that for that price.

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            • #7
              That's just BS
              Originally posted by macona View Post
              Very nice.

              Just remember the blade welder is not intended for making your own blades from stock but for doing internal cuts where you cut the blade, pass it though a hole, and re-weld it with the welder. The welds tend not to last nearly as long as a factory weld.
              “I know lots of people who are educated far beyond their intelligence”

              Lewis Grizzard

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              • #8
                It takes the right touch but I have found that blade life after welding is very dependent on the anneal.

                By the way, you suck.
                Last edited by KIMFAB; 10-15-2015, 05:09 PM.
                Guaranteed not to rust, bust, collect dust, bend, chip, crack or peel

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                • #9
                  I disagree about not being able to use the welder to make new blades from stock. We had the larger version of this saw in our shop for over 30 years. It had the same welder and worked just fine for making new blades.

                  http://www.ebay.com/itm/3613-0-DoALL...item51cf9a1fcf

                  We regularly had at least 20 different rolls of stock and made all our blades. The key is to grind it perfectly smooth then anneal it. It's somewhat of an art to anneal the blade properly. Once you get the hang of it the blades will last as long as any made by a commercial blade manufacturer

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                  • #10
                    Hey, you suck. Good luck with the move!

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I agree with some others, I've been welding blades from stock coils for 20+ yrs with no problem. I recently silver soldered a blade for an inside cut at home and it worked beautifully. Re soldered it after the cut was completed and it still is cutting fine. Using the blade welder, I've found that annealing. To a dull red works well. Bob.

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                      • #12
                        Suckus Maximus. I am stuck with a Horrible Freight Band Saw for the time being. It... could be better.

                        Anyway -- trick to using that welder to make new blades? Make sure all the internals are functional, clean the points of contact REALLY good and clean the blade to be welded really good too. THEN practice on a couple of pieces of scrap blade. As has been said it's all about the post-weld anneal. Each blade you make will be unique even from the same stock. Practice on a segment of scrap or cutoff first, then do your blade.

                        It's more art than science sadly otherwise I'd try to explain it better...
                        This is the ending.... still your need is driven on (driven on) as we trigger one more bomb...

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                        • #13
                          I bought a HSV model or something like that (still a 16" model). Drain the gearbox before you turn on it's spine. Mine leaked all over the trailer when I moved it.

                          Rich

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                          • #14
                            Congrats on purchase,what year is that one, I have a 1950 ML 16 that I refurbished and switched to 1ph power.You will appreciate the quality of that saw,is it a single or two speed gearbox.My Doall is the most used machine in my farm shop.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by macona View Post
                              Very nice.

                              Just remember the blade welder is not intended for making your own blades from stock but for doing internal cuts where you cut the blade, pass it though a hole, and re-weld it with the welder. The welds tend not to last nearly as long as a factory weld.
                              That I'm not sure about. I always msde up my own blades and the blade would tend to wear out long beore the welds broke. The secret is proper annealing. Took a bit of trial and error though. Plus if I mde blades up for myself I was selfish. Go and use the saw. Take the blade out. Put mine in. Finish task. Put original blade in. What destroyed more blades for us was die makers cutting body pannels for use as templates when repairing dies
                              Forty plus years and I still have ten toes, ten fingers and both eyes. I must be doing something right.

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