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Grizzly 7x12 vs. Grizzly 7x14

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  • #31
    A good visualization of the question asked is this; think of two piles of feces laying on the ground. One pile has slightly more corn in it than the other, but both are essentialy the same. Really though, it's been a decade since I used a mini-lathe, perhaps they improved them since.

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    • #32
      Originally posted by RB211 View Post
      A good visualization of the question asked is this; think of two piles of feces laying on the ground. One pile has slightly more corn in it than the other, but both are essentialy the same. Really though, it's been a decade since I used a mini-lathe, perhaps they improved them since.
      It's been a decade, and there have been improvements. The one the OP is looking at has a different bed than was made 10 years ago. It has different electronics. It has a tachometer and many other improvements over the 2005 modela. Chances are that the lathes that RB211 is disparaging is not the same as the one grizzly now sells.


      RB211, what was the manufacturer and model that you hated so much?


      Dan
      At the end of the project, there is a profound difference between spare parts and left over parts.

      Location: SF East Bay.

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      • #33
        Originally posted by danlb View Post
        It's been a decade, and there have been improvements. The one the OP is looking at has a different bed than was made 10 years ago. It has different electronics. It has a tachometer and many other improvements over the 2005 modela. Chances are that the lathes that RB211 is disparaging is not the same as the one grizzly now sells.


        RB211, what was the manufacturer and model that you hated so much?


        Dan
        Micromark 7x14, original with plastic gears. The tail stock was garbage, off on every axis, was not bored straight for ram and parallel to spindle, the cross slide handle slipped and relied on lock washer, too many things to list that spoke of poor product design and engineering. Today, with my current tools, I could fix all the problems, not back then.

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        • #34
          Originally posted by gzig5 View Post
          Hah, I just move an EMCO Super 11 into my basement last night. Wasn't too bad with two old guys and a hand cart. Used a come-along to get the machine off and back onto the cabinet. I will be getting one of these little 7x14 lathes one of these days. It will take up less space than my Atlas 6x18 and would be a little easier to move around as it has an integral motor. But, I think the EMCO will be going wherever I retire to as well.
          BTW there is a difference between the 7x14 mini lathes. I had ordered one from Amazon and with "free" shipping, Prime 2 day no less. When the UPS guy dropped it on my porch there was a trail of parts all the way from the truck to my porch. Box was open, it was the worst job of packing I had ever seen. But I decided to make the best of it. Got enough of it back together to take a test cut. Wow what a POS. I then decided to send it back, Amazon bless them took it back, parts and all and gave me a full refund.
          I really wanted the Grizzly but they were out of stock... again so I paid a lot more and got one from Little Machine Shop. Came in a wood box, not cardboard and worked perfectly out of the box. I had some 1 inch round bar (25 mm) I took a deep cut and not a problem. Once again, everything worked.
          Retired - Journeyman Refrigeration Pipefitter - Master Electrician - Fine Line Automation CNC 4x4 Router

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          • #35
            Yes, there are some significant differences in the quality of these but the ones available from LMS, Grizz, and LatheMaster seem to be pretty good these days. I'm on the hunt for a used POS with the intent to rescrape and re-motor it to better than new. Spindle bearings would have to be addressed too. If I don't find a good candidate, I'll bite the bullet and buy a better quality one. I like refurbishing the machines as much as using them to make "stuff".

            edit...One reason I'd like one of these little 7x lathes is that they appear to include everything to cut metric threads. Is that correct? I can and have done it on my Craftsman 12x36 (PITA) but I don't have the change gears for the EMCO or the SB 10L I'm finishing up. It would be worth it to get one and leave it setup for metric threads and do most other work on the other machines as needed.
            Last edited by gzig5; 10-29-2015, 10:22 AM.

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            • #36
              Originally posted by gzig5 View Post
              Yes, there are some significant differences in the quality of these but the ones available from LMS, Grizz, and LatheMaster seem to be pretty good these days. I'm on the hunt for a used POS with the intent to rescrape and re-motor it to better than new. Spindle bearings would have to be addressed too. If I don't find a good candidate, I'll bite the bullet and buy a better quality one. I like refurbishing the machines as much as using them to make "stuff".

              edit...One reason I'd like one of these little 7x lathes is that they appear to include everything to cut metric threads. Is that correct? I can and have done it on my Craftsman 12x36 (PITA) but I don't have the change gears for the EMCO or the SB 10L I'm finishing up. It would be worth it to get one and leave it setup for metric threads and do most other work on the other machines as needed.
              I don't know about the ones available in the US, but when I bought one in the UK a few years ago, I went for a metric one, so that I could do metric threads on it, because I didn't want to do the gear swapping on my bigger lathe.
              'It may not always be the best policy to do what is best technically, but those responsible for policy can never form a right judgement without knowledge of what is right technically' - 'Dutch' Kindelberger

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              • #37
                Originally posted by gzig5 View Post
                edit...One reason I'd like one of these little 7x lathes is that they appear to include everything to cut metric threads. Is that correct? I can and have done it on my Craftsman 12x36 (PITA) but I don't have the change gears for the EMCO or the SB 10L I'm finishing up. It would be worth it to get one and leave it setup for metric threads and do most other work on the other machines as needed.
                The advertising for these lathes is often misleading. The lathe can be supplied with either a metric leadscrew (of 1.5mm pitch) or an Imperial leadscrew (of 16TPI). You can, of course, buy both, and change them (and the half-nuts) as required, but I discovered that with four extra change wheels (extra, that is, to the metric-matching ones supplied) I can use my metric leadscrew to cut Imperial threads as well, to an accuracy of around a few thou per inch. There isn't room to fit a 127-tooth gear, so that common option is not available for these lathes.
                Because I made the mistake of getting the lathe with the factory-fitted DROs, the cross-slide and compound slide are fitted with 20TPI screws. The DROs prevent the compound from being turned to half the pitch angle for screw-cutting. They also flatten their batteries in a few weeks even when turned off, so all in all they are a PITA. Don't waste your money on them.

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                • #38
                  Originally posted by Mike Burch View Post
                  The advertising for these lathes is often misleading. The lathe can be supplied with either a metric leadscrew (of 1.5mm pitch) or an Imperial leadscrew (of 16TPI). You can, of course, buy both, and change them (and the half-nuts) as required, but I discovered that with four extra change wheels (extra, that is, to the metric-matching ones supplied) I can use my metric leadscrew to cut Imperial threads as well, to an accuracy of around a few thou per inch. There isn't room to fit a 127-tooth gear, so that common option is not available for these lathes.
                  Because I made the mistake of getting the lathe with the factory-fitted DROs, the cross-slide and compound slide are fitted with 20TPI screws. The DROs prevent the compound from being turned to half the pitch angle for screw-cutting. They also flatten their batteries in a few weeks even when turned off, so all in all they are a PITA. Don't waste your money on them.
                  You can get usable metric threads with an imperial 7 inch Seig lathe by adding just a 21 tooth gear (sold by little machine shop ). They wont be perfect, but the common metric threads will be within 100th of a percent of the correct size. For 1.25 mm pitch, that translates to 0.0013 mm error over 10 threads. It works for most common home shop uses. There is a thread calculator at http://littlemachineshop.com/reference/change_gears.php that will tell you which gears to use, and you can add your custom gears (Like the 21T) to the list.


                  Dan
                  At the end of the project, there is a profound difference between spare parts and left over parts.

                  Location: SF East Bay.

                  Comment


                  • #39
                    For people who want something a little bit bigger than a 7x12/14 I'd recommend the Lathemaster 8x14.
                    http://lathemaster.com/LATHEMASTER8x14Lathe.htm

                    If you want something bigger than that' Id personally skip the 9x20 sized machines, do to the weak compound mounting scheme so many of them use, and go with one of these instead.

                    http://www.machinetoolonline.com/PM1030.html
                    http://www.machinetoolonline.com/PM-1127-VF.html

                    Once you get into the 12" machines you are going to need 220 and special equipment to move the machine around. The above machines can be manhandled buy one or two strong people if you strip them down.
                    -Dan S.
                    dans-hobbies.com

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                    • #40
                      Originally posted by dan s View Post
                      Once you get into the 12" machines you are going to need 220 and special equipment to move the machine around.
                      What kind of special equipment? Machinery dollies which can be rented or specialized equipment like 1" iron pipe for rollers and a good sized pry bar?

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                      • #41
                        Originally posted by Rosco-P View Post
                        What kind of special equipment? Machinery dollies which can be rented or specialized equipment like 1" iron pipe for rollers and a good sized pry bar?
                        Take this 12" grizzly.
                        http://www.grizzly.com/products/12-x...g-Lathe/G0750G

                        it's a 1000 pounds, and you need to lift that thing up on to the bench. That's going to require at least an engine hoist to lift, and the proper rigging straps. That's going to be $250 or so if you have to buy everything because you live in an area that doesn't have a tool rental place. Even if you do have a rental place near by, they have to have on in stock, and it can be 40 to 60 dollars a day to rent one. and you most likely aren't going to have it for one day.
                        Last edited by dan s; 10-30-2015, 10:51 PM.
                        -Dan S.
                        dans-hobbies.com

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