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  • GRIZZLY 10x22 G0602

    After posting a couple threads on 7xXX, 9x19, and 8x16 Grizzly machines I started to consider the 10x22 Grizzly. Any thoughts, experience, and opinions on the quality of this machine? Its more than i wanted to spend on a hobby lathe but its only $250 more than than the 9x19 i was first considering. Is it worth it?

  • #2
    I have no experience with this lathe, but I checked out the manual.

    First, the threading gears are changed under the left hand cover. The manual says you need 65 inches of space to operate the lathe.

    Second, the lathe lacks a power feed. You can set the change gears for a very fine thread to emulate a power feed.

    Third, the lathe uses a thicker belt, should be better able to transmit power under high torque.

    Fourth, the gear box gives you 6 threads at a time. Two coarse, two medium and two fine. You swap the change gears to get the next set of 6.

    The basics of the lathe design are the same as the 9x20.

    The 10x22 has a 1 HP motor, so should be capable of deeper cuts if you have the right tooling and are close to the chuck.

    Dan
    At the end of the project, there is a profound difference between spare parts and left over parts.

    Location: SF East Bay.

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    • #3
      To me, the larger spindle bore and longer travels as well as the bigger everything else would make it very worthwhile. The next step up is a 12" whatever which is 2X the money. The 11 x 26 is the same machine, slightly bigger. The 12" and larger machines are in a different class. They have the quick change features without changing gear sets all the time.
      Last edited by Toolguy; 11-13-2015, 07:54 PM.
      Kansas City area

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      • #4
        150 rpm is a screamin-fast lowest speed, but that's true of almost any of those units. NONE have back gears. You can do some belt magic to fix that, too.

        1" bore is nice, you might like it. looks a lot more beefy than the "standard 9 x 20" machines.
        2730

        Keep eye on ball.
        Hashim Khan


        It's just a box of rain, I don't know who put it there.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by danlb View Post
          I have no experience with this lathe, but I checked out the manual.

          Second, the lathe lacks a power feed. You can set the change gears for a very fine thread to emulate a power feed.
          Dan
          Dan you'll have to brush on your reading comprehension skills. I just looked at the manual as well and it does indeed have longitudinal power feed. Check out page 45, fig. 61
          9 steps of power feed from 0.0025-0.014 in. per rev.

          This lathe is considerably heavier and more robust than the 9x20 lathes, I've used both side by side and there is no comparison between the two. Not only is it more rigid than a 9x20 it also is more capable in it's ability to handle larger stock. The threading capabilities I think also are much better but I'd have to look at the 9x20 specs. But why bother.
          At $250 difference in price between the two there is absolutely no reason to buy the 9x20 if you've narrowed it down to these two.
          Home, down in the valley behind the Red Angus
          Bad Decisions Make Good Stories​

          Location: British Columbia

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          • #6
            My original budget was $1000 max for a hobby lathe to play with. The total price for the G0602 delivered is $1349. Thats like 35% over budget. Is this machine worth the price tag and will it hold up if treated proper? I am just a poor country boy who turns wrenches for a living $1350 is a lot to spend in one place for me.

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            • #7
              I don't like steering someone away from this site cause I think it's great, but for now just have a quick look at the links below as one is dedicated to the Grizzly 10x22 and it's siblings exclusively while the other one seems to have a large number of 10x22 users. This might give you the experience base your looking for. But if it was me making the decision to buy a 9x19 now or put off the 10x22 until I had the extra $350, I'd wait.
              Better a Chevy next month than a Yugo today.

              Oh and ya better not abandon this ship or we'll come lookin' fer ya.

              https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/...guid=199357009

              http://www.projectsinmetal.com/
              Home, down in the valley behind the Red Angus
              Bad Decisions Make Good Stories​

              Location: British Columbia

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              • #8
                I love my 10x22 worth the extra money

                sent from my shop paradise

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Willy View Post
                  Dan you'll have to brush on your reading comprehension skills. I just looked at the manual as well and it does indeed have longitudinal power feed. Check out page 45, fig. 61
                  9 steps of power feed from 0.0025-0.014 in. per rev.
                  Yep. I saw that too. It's done by changing the threading change gears to the highest ratio.

                  Dan
                  At the end of the project, there is a profound difference between spare parts and left over parts.

                  Location: SF East Bay.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by danlb View Post
                    Yep. I saw that too. It's done by changing the threading change gears to the highest ratio.

                    Dan

                    Nope, totally different set of gears and gear placement.
                    Read about the gear set up for threading and their placement very carefully. Both inch and metric threading gear placement is completely different from the power feed gears.

                    But yes the lead screw and gear train are shared for both threading and power feed, I assume this is the point you're trying to make. However stating that the lathe has no power feed is only confusing and misleading to those not familiar with the machine, just wanted to clarify this to the OP.

                    No dedicated systems for lathes in this price range. It's simply not feasible at this level. One has to accept some compromises at this price point otherwise we're going to be looking at a significantly higher cost.
                    Home, down in the valley behind the Red Angus
                    Bad Decisions Make Good Stories​

                    Location: British Columbia

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I did not mean to disparage anything. I could not find a lever or plunger to put it into "feed" mode as opposed to "Threading" mode. Must have missed it.

                      A dedicated longitudinal feed is not a big thing for home shops. It only comes in to play when you are repetitively turning then threading and back again.

                      I'm curious now... did they sneak in a second gear train that I did not notice, so that you can leave the change gears in place for threading and switch back and forth to the feed gears?

                      Dan
                      At the end of the project, there is a profound difference between spare parts and left over parts.

                      Location: SF East Bay.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        On my HF 9x20 there is a separate lever for longitudinal power feed, and it has a separate reduction gear that moves the carriage much more slowly (maybe a factor of 5-10) than it does when using the half-nut for threading. You can use all nine positions of the quick-change gearbox but usually only the highest(9), middle(5), and lowest(1) are used for about 2:1 ratio of feed. Then the change gears can give three more ranges. I haven't used the power feed very much, as I like the "feel" of advancing the tool using the handwheel, but the power feed does give a better finish and more consistency. A power cross-feed is handy for facing large diameters and for parting, but not a big deal for hobby use.
                        Last edited by PStechPaul; 11-14-2015, 02:36 AM. Reason: correction
                        http://pauleschoen.com/pix/PM08_P76_P54.png
                        Paul , P S Technology, Inc. and MrTibbs
                        USA Maryland 21030

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                        • #13
                          Thanks for all the input guys. I am just trying to get as mutch input on this machine as i can before i pull the trigger.
                          Last edited by Jmay; 11-14-2015, 03:44 PM.

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                          • #14
                            It is wise to do your homework. Whatever you get, you will likely have to live with for a long time.
                            Kansas City area

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                            • #15
                              I've owned my lathe for decades now, and have made many mods and attachments for it that wouldn't fit any other lathe. If I buy a larger lathe now, I'd be facing the prospect of doing the same for it. If you're going to be doing any real mods to the lathe, it would pay to push your envelope a bit and get the 10x22 now instead of a smaller one since you'd be more likely to keep it longer, and the investment you put in by 'upgrading' it here and there with mods will be more worth it.

                              My lathe has a #3 morse taper spindle, and that 10x22 has a #3 tailstock taper. That would be a good upgrade for me since I could use the existing lathe to make tailstock accessories. I'd be keeping the existing lathe of course, so the big deal with me is room. I'd also like to upgrade to a more capable milling machine- either way I'd have to start with getting or making a rolling platform capable of handling at least a ton or so. The 10x22 is heavy enough as it is, so you might want to consider how you will be handling it. This problem only gets worse, so keep your eyes open for a hoisting and rolling device (engine hoist probably). As young as you probably are, still try to work smarter and not harder- save your back. You probably have friends who are willing to help you manage the lathe, but you still need to be smart about it for everybody's safety.
                              I seldom do anything within the scope of logical reason and calculated cost/benefit, etc- I'm following my passion-

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