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  • Craftsman / Atlas lathe

    Does anyone know where I can buy a "pinion" gear for a 6" three jaw Craftsman / Atlas chuck. I'm getting a little tired of continually heli-arc welding the broken teeth .

  • #2
    I don't have any specific suggestions for a replacement pinion but there are used equipment dealers who advertise in Village Press publications and a Yahoo Group dedicated to Atlas/Craftsman lathes that might be a fruitful place to raise the question. Whatever you do, don't ask on the Practical Machinist site. Read the rules there about what equipment is machina non grata. Otherwise the discussions are sometimes helpful and the parts and equipment buy/sell forums are interesting.

    Without knowing more about the chuck itself, my first thought is it just may be new chuck time. OTOH, there can be other reasons a chuck might be discarded making it more probable you can find the pinion you need.
    .
    "People will occasionally stumble over the truth, but most of the time they will pick themselves up and carry on" : Winston Churchill

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    • #3
      plenty of parts on e-bay , just hold your nose with one hand and type with the other.
      FORD BEATING JAP CRAP SINCE 1941!! CAROLYN JONES(1930-1983 actress)may this lady never be forgotten.

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      • #4
        Now then, I have a question......Why are you welding up broken teeth?

        Obviously to repair them, that's not what I mean..... No, I wonder why are they breaking so much? That seems very relevant... a new pinion or chuck may not be a lasting solution.

        The logical reason is that it is being tightened very hard. So then, WHY?

        Are you just hard on tools? Is the chuck itself quite stiff in action? Does it not hold the work well unless reefed on like crazy?

        Those are some possible reasons. Ignoring the first reason, a stiff chuck may need dis-assembled, cleaned, and lubricated. A chuck that does not hold well may be bell-mouthed, have loose jaws, or the body may be distorted, to give just three examples of possible problems.

        I'd first want to know why it gets tightened so hard, and then perhaps I would replace it if repair is not practical.
        Last edited by J Tiers; 11-18-2015, 01:36 AM.
        1601

        Keep eye on ball.
        Hashim Khan

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        • #5
          That's one of the first things I did on my A/C--I replaced the flimsy Crapsman chuck with a 6" Bison.

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          • #6
            I agree just put a better chuck on it.
            "Let me recommend the best medicine in the
            world: a long journey, at a mild season, through a pleasant
            country, in easy stages."
            ~ James Madison

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            • #7
              Yep, put a better chuck on it. I started out with that 6" Craftsman (Atlas) lathe way back in 1958 when I was 18 years old. I bought it from the money I saved working weekends at a local hobby shop. My dad, a hunter and fisherman, wanted me to buy a shotgun with my savings and took me down to the gun store to look them over. I think it broke his heart when I bought the lathe instead. He asked me where I was planning to put it. I said "in my bedroom". He said "absolutely not! Those thing make a mess!" I replied that it wouldn't, but the lathe went to the basement anyway. Dad was right. It DOES make a mess. Live and learn at the age of 18. : )

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              • #8
                Originally posted by planeman View Post
                Yep, put a better chuck on it. I started out with that 6" Craftsman (Atlas) lathe way back in 1958 when I was 18 years old. I bought it from the money I saved working weekends at a local hobby shop. My dad, a hunter and fisherman, wanted me to buy a shotgun with my savings and took me down to the gun store to look them over. I think it broke his heart when I bought the lathe instead. He asked me where I was planning to put it. I said "in my bedroom". He said "absolutely not! Those thing make a mess!" I replied that it wouldn't, but the lathe went to the basement anyway. Dad was right. It DOES make a mess. Live and learn at the age of 18. : )

                Great story, did you make anything with the lathe then for your father to help make it better?
                Andy

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                • #9
                  Thank you for the tips. I agree, it is time to replace the chuck with a better one. I have come across chuck parts on Ebay and have noticed that the pinion gears have suffered like mine. I was always suspect of the chuck having only one gear for tightening but then again this lathe is really only a toy lathe. I have been using lathes since I was a first year apprentice when I was fifteen years old and I don't believe that I am hard on tooling, however if a part is starting to move in the chuck while being machined then it is obvious that it needs to be tightened a little more. Thanks again.

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                  • #10
                    Very good chucks may also have only one pinion.

                    You might check the chuck for bellmouth if the part moves. Spinning is one thing, shifting is another. Spinning is looseness or a slippery hardened part.

                    Shifting may be the part flopping due to jaw tips not contacting the work, or it may be due to the entire set of jaws plus scroll shifting due to loose scroll bearing. That's less likely due to construction of a 3 jaw, but I have shimmed the scroll in a chuck and things improved considerably after that.
                    1601

                    Keep eye on ball.
                    Hashim Khan

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