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  • American Pacemaker apron rebuild

    As requested/promised in the high bay shop light thread, I dug up some photos of the of the process for those sharp eyed folks who saw the apron for this lathe sitting on the bench.

    Pacemakers are new territory for me, most of my previous experience along these lines has been with Lodge & Shipley products. Only because of my previous experience, I would have preferred to have something that I was familiar with, but L&S didn't make anything in this size, at least not that I was able to find, so a Pacemaker it is!!

    It certainly is another level of complexity, the Zip Shift feature that allows pre-selection and shifting of spindle speeds in the power shift headstock from the apron, mechanical rapid traverse for both the carriage and cross slide, and 3 lubrication pumps, 2 powered and 1 manual, that pump oil from the apron to the various points in the apron and to the longitudinal and cross slide ways. These pumps were the main focus of the dis-assembly as it has been my previous experience that coolant finds it's way into the apron and sludge is formed that then disables these pumps.

    Especially on a lathe this size, this can make it an extremely arduous task to crank the carriage and/or cross slide into position. This is less of an issue on a lathe that has rapids, but that just makes it easier to ignore the lack of lubrication.

    This is just about the lightest version of this model, if you can call a 35,000# lathe light. It is a 32" swing lathe that has been "raised in the sand" to allow a swing of 46" with a center distance of 14'.

    Dave








  • #2
    Photos of dis-assembled apron.

    The accumulation of sludge was not as severe as I had feared, 1/4" - 1/2" deep in the bottom of the apron. Still enough to possibly interfere with proper function of the lubrication system and some metering orfices plugged.

    Dave







    Comment


    • #3
      On my tiny Pacemaker the swing is over the carriage not the ways so my 14x56 swings 22" over the ways. I like her big sister even though she doesn't have the awesome shifter mine has

      Comment


      • #4
        That's an amazing number of parts in that apron. I'm sure it will be nice knowing that everything in there is clean and in good working order.

        What a nice lathe, easily qualifies as tool porn.


        ME

        Comment


        • #5
          Oh that's tool porn all right! I couldn't swing the hand wheel off the apron in my 10K! Geez that's beautiful. Back in my dark
          ages I had the opportunity to operate a 36" x 12' old Monarch. Haven't touched anything near that big since. Maybe I should
          visit you Dave just so I can touch it!! You should post more pics of your big stuff. I know I would enjoy it.

          Pete
          1973 SB 10K .
          BenchMaster mill.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by flylo View Post
            On my tiny Pacemaker the swing is over the carriage not the ways so my 14x56 swings 22" over the ways. I like her big sister even though she doesn't have the awesome shifter mine has
            Yes, I would agree Flylo, your Pacemaker has a much more interesting shifter!!

            So that brings up an interesting point, maybe I am mis-interpreting those numbers cast into the headstock. When you say "over the carriage" I assume you mean the cross slide? I will have to measure what the swing would be over the cross slide. Were all Pacemakers listed that way?

            Dave

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by 10KPete View Post
              Oh that's tool porn all right! I couldn't swing the hand wheel off the apron in my 10K! Geez that's beautiful. Back in my dark
              ages I had the opportunity to operate a 36" x 12' old Monarch. Haven't touched anything near that big since. Maybe I should
              visit you Dave just so I can touch it!! You should post more pics of your big stuff. I know I would enjoy it.

              Pete
              Pete, you just come on over, I'll supply the rags and you can touch it all over all you want. Hell, I will even supply the beer!



              Seriously, if anyone happens to be in the area, I maintain a fully stocked refreshment center, complete with refrigerator and both healthy and salted peanuts.

              Dave

              Comment


              • #8
                Holy smokes,that apron has got more parts than most complete lathes That's gonna be a fine machine when your done,I've always considered Pacemakers to be the pinnacle of lathe design IMO.
                I just need one more tool,just one!

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by becksmachine View Post
                  As requested/promised in the high bay shop light thread, I dug up some photos of the of the process for those sharp eyed folks who saw the apron for this lathe sitting on the bench.

                  Pacemakers are new territory for me, most of my previous experience along these lines has been with Lodge & Shipley products. Only because of my previous experience, I would have preferred to have something that I was familiar with, but L&S didn't make anything in this size, at least not that I was able to find, so a Pacemaker it is!!

                  It certainly is another level of complexity, the Zip Shift feature that allows pre-selection and shifting of spindle speeds in the power shift headstock from the apron, mechanical rapid traverse for both the carriage and cross slide, and 3 lubrication pumps, 2 powered and 1 manual, that pump oil from the apron to the various points in the apron and to the longitudinal and cross slide ways. These pumps were the main focus of the dis-assembly as it has been my previous experience that coolant finds it's way into the apron and sludge is formed that then disables these pumps.

                  Especially on a lathe this size, this can make it an extremely arduous task to crank the carriage and/or cross slide into position. This is less of an issue on a lathe that has rapids, but that just makes it easier to ignore the lack of lubrication.

                  This is just about the lightest version of this model, if you can call a 35,000# lathe light. It is a 32" swing lathe that has been "raised in the sand" to allow a swing of 46" with a center distance of 14'.

                  Dave







                  Let me guess...you bought this one to make watch parts on, right?[emoji1]

                  Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-G900A using Tapatalk

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Dave
                    We had a couple of Americans like that back in the 80's in out shop
                    great machines. Had a electrical problem on the carriage and the machinist said we needed a new drum switch.

                    I ordered it from American ( LaBlonde) and got a ordinary AB drum switch that they had modified by drilling a roll pin hole.
                    Cost was over 300 when the AB switch could be purchased for 60 bucks . I called them on it and they said they had to pull a print to find the modification, and that cost $$

                    Cheers
                    Rich
                    Green Bay, WI

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by becksmachine View Post
                      Yes, I would agree Flylo, your Pacemaker has a much more interesting shifter!!

                      So that brings up an interesting point, maybe I am mis-interpreting those numbers cast into the headstock. When you say "over the carriage" I assume you mean the cross slide? I will have to measure what the swing would be over the cross slide. Were all Pacemakers listed that way?

                      Dave
                      All that I've seen are over the cross slide yes.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Usually there is a swing over the ways, which is the biggest. Then over the carriage, meaning the wings, which often is the same number.

                        Over the crosslide would always be smaller, but for anything intended for long shafts or rolls would be the only number worth knowing. Makes sense to give that number for a machine which is as long as yours, nobody will be as interested in how big faceplate work could be on a shaft and roll lathe.
                        1601

                        Keep eye on ball.
                        Hashim Khan

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          I've found the alot of large lathe makers measured over the cross slide & most all smalll lathe makers measure over the ways.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            I was admiring how much more massive that tailstock is than my lathe, but then I had to admit the same could be said for the compound. And probably even the steady.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              I would love to see that thing taking a cut when it's running, I mean it's just meant for metal removal on a biblical scale, I just looked at my little toy and now feel sad, I think I'm going to paint it in stripes, the Mrs says stripes make women look bigger, wonder if it works for lathes?, well makes their ass bigger I've just been corrected,
                              Mark

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