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Photo heavy build of instrument lathe steady rest

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  • Photo heavy build of instrument lathe steady rest

    Hi Everyone,

    A few weeks ago I posted views of this steady rest in the shop made tools thread:



    I mentioned having a lot of photos from the build and 'cuz some of you have requested views of setups, that's what this thread is about.

    Here is the start:



    After cleaning up two sides so I could hold it in the vise securely, I roughed out the two faces. Then I laid out and rough sawed the pieces:



    Followed by cleaning up the narrow sides:



    I seldom use this cutter because it is WAY too large for a B-port, but it was free sooooooo..........by taking light cuts and keeping the quill all the way up, I can keep from pounding out the spindle bearings and bell mouthing the bore the quill slides in.

    More on the way...........................
    Last edited by jhe.1973; 12-28-2018, 01:01 PM.
    Best wishes to ya’ll.

    Sincerely,

    Jim

    "To invent you need a good imagination and a pile of junk" - Thomas Edison

    "I've always wanted to get a job as a procrastinator but I keep putting off going out to find one so I guess I'll never realize my life's dream. Frustrating!" - Me

  • #2


    The above shows the roughing out of the tab that is to become the male part of the hinge. The next view is the cutting of the hinge slot only as far as needed. This slot then becomes the gauge for trimming the tab sticking up on the body to the right.



    This view also shows a shop trick I learned at one place I worked. If you keep a grease pencil handy you can write notes/dimensions etc. right on the machine and they wipe off easily when finished.

    Here I am finishing the hinge tab:


    And the final fit of the two pieces:



    Still more coming....................
    Last edited by jhe.1973; 12-28-2018, 01:11 PM.
    Best wishes to ya’ll.

    Sincerely,

    Jim

    "To invent you need a good imagination and a pile of junk" - Thomas Edison

    "I've always wanted to get a job as a procrastinator but I keep putting off going out to find one so I guess I'll never realize my life's dream. Frustrating!" - Me

    Comment


    • #3
      These are the steps for the bore. I centered the spindle on the parting line, the center punch mark previously shown was just for layout purposes:







      Next, I cleaned up the front face and the two sides in the surface grinder to get clamping/reference faces for most following setups:



      Did you notice the strip of cardboard along one of the narrow sides? I often use the cardboard from the back of tablets 'cuz it keeps from marring finished surfaces.
      Last edited by jhe.1973; 12-28-2018, 01:20 PM.
      Best wishes to ya’ll.

      Sincerely,

      Jim

      "To invent you need a good imagination and a pile of junk" - Thomas Edison

      "I've always wanted to get a job as a procrastinator but I keep putting off going out to find one so I guess I'll never realize my life's dream. Frustrating!" - Me

      Comment


      • #4
        This is one of the most important steps to make this job easier. By making a cutter with the correct angle I can center the part in the angle plate and just move the table each side of zero on the DRO until I have the correct width.



        This allows me to remove and replace the part for each trial on the lathe bed until it is an exact fit.

        I know that the makers of Kurt style vises probably won't like to admit it, but the fixed jaw flexes when tightened. Not much, but it does. If I didn't use a precision angle plate and took the part out of the vise for each trial, I would have to be sure that I clamped it with the same force each time I put it back in the machine.

        So, here are some views of making the cutter starting with spinning the angle



        Then setting up to grind the cutting edge to be on the center line:



        The last step is to grind cutting clearance leaving a tiny bit of the cylindrical grind:

        Last edited by jhe.1973; 12-28-2018, 01:40 PM.
        Best wishes to ya’ll.

        Sincerely,

        Jim

        "To invent you need a good imagination and a pile of junk" - Thomas Edison

        "I've always wanted to get a job as a procrastinator but I keep putting off going out to find one so I guess I'll never realize my life's dream. Frustrating!" - Me

        Comment


        • #5
          Here is another view of the cutting process when it was just about complete:



          Next, I turned up a plug to use for locating the holes for the fingers:



          This went into an indexer like so:



          I forgot to take a view of how I cut the back side and established the curve so here it is out of sequence:

          Last edited by jhe.1973; 12-28-2018, 02:07 PM.
          Best wishes to ya’ll.

          Sincerely,

          Jim

          "To invent you need a good imagination and a pile of junk" - Thomas Edison

          "I've always wanted to get a job as a procrastinator but I keep putting off going out to find one so I guess I'll never realize my life's dream. Frustrating!" - Me

          Comment


          • #6
            This is how I cut the curved sides. I had drawn this steady in CAD so I just had to move the spindle to the correct distance off the side of the part and keep advancing the boring head until I got the correct measurement from the central bore:



            Notice the cardboard again?

            This was how I cut the angle on the top. The second view shows the additional clamp for the actual cutting:





            To cut the other angle this was the setup:



            I could cut this side with the clamping screw in place. Because the other side cut into the clamping screw hole, I had to do that side by itself.
            Last edited by jhe.1973; 12-28-2018, 02:13 PM.
            Best wishes to ya’ll.

            Sincerely,

            Jim

            "To invent you need a good imagination and a pile of junk" - Thomas Edison

            "I've always wanted to get a job as a procrastinator but I keep putting off going out to find one so I guess I'll never realize my life's dream. Frustrating!" - Me

            Comment


            • #7
              Not wanting to replace the vise w/my heavy rotary table I chose to cut the end radii on the tee nut by swinging it by hand and using VERY light cuts.









              These views just were to show the various hand positions. I am not recommending this procedure for the novice or faint of heart because it requires a fair amount of concentration, downward hand hand pressure and you MUST stop before the cutter could grab into the approaching flat at the end of the cut.

              I am just showing this as a possibility PROVIDED a person uses great care and takes the risks into account. I also am using a very small diameter end mill to reduce the cutting/lifting force.
              Last edited by jhe.1973; 12-28-2018, 02:18 PM.
              Best wishes to ya’ll.

              Sincerely,

              Jim

              "To invent you need a good imagination and a pile of junk" - Thomas Edison

              "I've always wanted to get a job as a procrastinator but I keep putting off going out to find one so I guess I'll never realize my life's dream. Frustrating!" - Me

              Comment


              • #8
                The finished tee nut in front of its slot:



                And in place:



                This is how it looked since last February before I had the time to blend and smooth the surfaces. The layout dye is left over from the final fitting trials that I mentioned previously.

                The thumb screws are commercial ones I got years ago from a lamp parts supplier. I think that some of the larger hardware stores handle them also.



                Another finished view:

                Last edited by jhe.1973; 12-28-2018, 02:25 PM.
                Best wishes to ya’ll.

                Sincerely,

                Jim

                "To invent you need a good imagination and a pile of junk" - Thomas Edison

                "I've always wanted to get a job as a procrastinator but I keep putting off going out to find one so I guess I'll never realize my life's dream. Frustrating!" - Me

                Comment


                • #9
                  Cracking good work. Such a nice part, I especially like seeing the transformation from a piece of flame-cut plate.
                  Peter - novice home machinist, modern motorcycle enthusiast.

                  Denford Viceroy 280 Synchro (11 x 24)
                  Herbert 0V adapted to R8 by 'Sir John'.
                  Monarch 10EE 1942

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    You have an excellent sense of line and proportion Jim. Beautiful piece.

                    Pete
                    1973 SB 10K .
                    BenchMaster mill.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Very nice!

                      Just have to ask, in the first post, the third image, green layout fluid or a trick of the light?

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Beautiful work.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Nice work and well documented too. I'm wondering what took you longer to do....... the actual making of the part or all the picture taking and up loading and posting !!

                          JL.............

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            That is awesome!!!! Very inspiring to see such a high level of work.

                            Andy

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              very nice work and great presentation. I've a Schaublin 70 I just got that needs one and may well copy it!
                              .

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