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Walker Turner Drill press electrical Help needed

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  • Walker Turner Drill press electrical Help needed

    Last year, I acquired this drill press.

    I’m pretty sure it was wired for 220 volts but I have no way of checking that. I really want to re-wire it for 110 so I figured it would be easy since it has the schematic on the wire covers. Here is a picture of that plate.

    When I removed the plate only 4 of the wires on the motor were marked with the metal tags (1-4) the other two wires were just the same black wires.
    Here is a schematic of the entire wiring:

    Motor tag:

    Now you know as much as I do. So, by looking at this can you tell me if it is wired for 220 or 110, and if 220, can you give me an idea on how to re-wire it for 110?
    Thanks in advance.
    Jeff

  • #2
    Additional pictures:





    Here is what the plug looks like:

    Comment


    • #3
      lovely looking DP, I have a smaller and older version of that and love it.

      As for motors - that looks like a 220V plug to me Also 220V motors are, in my electrically simple mind, 2 110V windings wired in series, so you'll have +ve going to the start of 1 set of run windings (and presumably start windings too), -ve going to the end of the other set, and a jumper in the middle to join the 2 together in series. Looks like 2 and 3 are the jumper, 1 might be the start (or end) of 1 winding, 4 the start (or end) of the other and the unlabelled ones being the start windings, which from crusty memory, might be 110V or something.

      Anyway, don't trust that opinion as I don't know much about motors, but if I were a gambling man, I'd bet on 220V

      Comment


      • #4
        Based on the way the wires are connected, it appears to be 220. The plug suggests that is correct.

        Can't be 100% sure, because I can't see all the wires.
        1601

        Keep eye on ball.
        Hashim Khan

        Comment


        • #5
          I can not tell anything from your photographs of the actual wiring: well, not much anyway.

          From your pencil sketch and the diagrams on the cover plate I can deduce one thing: these show THREE different hookups, not just two. Your sketch can not be matched with either of the diagrams on the cover plate.

          From this I suspect that the motor may have been replaced. But I do see a red, and a green wire in the junction box in your photo. And one wire that could be either yellow or white. So I wonder why you say all the wires are black. That junction box appears to have three entryways, one in the rear, one on the left and one on top. Could you identify where the wires in each of those three go to or from? I suspect this junction box is mounted on the motor and the wires exiting from it's rear opening are going to the motor. But it does not look like there are six wires there: perhaps two or three and they all appear to be black.

          Not enough information to figure out anything.
          Paul A.
          SE Texas

          Make it fit.
          You can't win and there is a penalty for trying!

          Comment


          • #6
            Paul is correct the OPs diagram doesn't make sense in reference to the cover plate wiring. Part of the confusion is the motor pecker head we see is also the junction box that connects the switch wiring. Looks like a chunk of SO/SJ is feeding it from the top and then some more wires disappear into the flex conduit. Basically I always tell people it should be pretty easy to tell low from high since in the high configuration we should see three wired tied together with no power applied to them. I have found that sometimes the wire labels are not visible because of all the tape and in one instance they numbered the ring connectors of the wires. In this case the plug is a NEMA 6-20 connector so the machine should be wired for 220 volt.
            Last edited by Ohio Mike; 01-05-2016, 10:07 PM. Reason: typos

            Comment


            • #7
              I have to disagree on the plug. That's a 20 Amp 110 Volt plug.
              Location: Long Island, N.Y.

              Comment


              • #8
                Here is the picture of the wire box.


                The wire that is on the top is what goes to the plug - it has a black, white, and green. The cable on the left goes to the switch. It has two reds, and two blacks wires. From the motor is 6 black wires and only 4 of them have numbers on them. Two of them are tag less.

                I agree nothing on the wiring plate matches how the motor is wired. I do know it worked when I purchased it. There are 6 black wires that come out of the motor into that box. The sketch I have shown above is exactly how is it wired. When I saw the plaque and then the wire - I was confused and why I came to you to help.

                I don't think there are any tags on the other two black wires as I unwrapped one of them and it was blank.

                I think this is the original motor (at least the motor has the same name as the drill press).

                Tomorrow, I will take better picture of the wires in the box with additional light.
                Last edited by JeffKranz; 01-05-2016, 11:09 PM.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by RichR View Post
                  I have to disagree on the plug. That's a 20 Amp 110 Volt plug.
                  Never mind, I got confused. It's a 220v 20A plug.
                  Location: Long Island, N.Y.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    JeffKranz

                    Your hand drawn diagram shows. 1-2-3-4 As the run winding Hooked for 220 volts The two unmarked wires are very likely the start winding hooked for 220 volts. This would work as the start winding is only energized for a short time. Arbitrarily Mark those wires 5-8 which would correspond to 1-2 on the motor diagram. The new numbered wires 1-2-3-4 would correspond to old diagram as 1-black, 2-yellow, 3-red, and 4-green. Check with ohm meter to verify. Unless this motor was rewound for a 220 volt start (unlikely ) use your motor diagrams with the numbers that I gave.

                    Bob

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by RichR View Post
                      Never mind, I got confused. It's a 220v 20A plug.

                      NEVER jump to a conclusion on that configuration. :-) ALWAYS check the view and the NEC sheet. :-)
                      ...lew...

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        " I do know it worked when I purchased it."
                        In that case, couldn't you simply ask the bloke you purchased it from?

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by RichR View Post
                          Never mind, I got confused. It's a 220v 20A plug.
                          Just I thought which you probably won't like. If you know it works then go buy a NEMA 6-20 outlet wire up a pigtail and test it. If it works then wire that outlet up and be done with it. You could have that done before we're done debating what is going on in there.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Thanks for the help - I did wire it up today to 220 volt plug that I already had. I had to drag it to the other end of the shop. It worked great so at least I know it works on 220. My original post was I wanted to convert it to 110 since I have those outlets at and 4' x 8' granite surface plate island I have in my woodshop but have decided to move it to the end of the table saw which has a 220 outlet in the concrete floor. I will now just purchase the correct plug, some cord, and two receptacles and wire it at the table saw location. I'm just going to make up a two outlet 220 extension cord.

                            Thanks again for the help.

                            Jeff

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