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ER 32 collet chuck or draw bar style for my bench top lathe?

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  • ER 32 collet chuck or draw bar style for my bench top lathe?

    Hi im trying to figure out what would be best fro my bench lathe. ( key things to keep in mind... fastest set up, ease of use, cheapest)
    my lathe is the grizzly 11 by 26 lathe one inch through bore Spindle thread: 1-3/4" x 8 TPI. And if you guys could steer me in the right direction to a place to buy this would be great as well thanks

  • #2
    Hello,

    When I had a Boxford lathe (UK copy of the Southbend) which was about the same capacity as your lathe, I bought the backplate style chuck (plus a backplate of course) and was very happy with it. The reasoning was that I wanted to be able to take advantage of the spindle bore for longer stock. BUT remember the max. size of ER32 is 20mm. so you cannot take full advantage of the 1 inch spindle bore. Also be aware that the full set of collets will likely cost more than either style of chuck.

    HTH, Ian

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    • #3
      I love er32 on my mill/drill, can't imagine why you wouldn't on a lathe, especially if you can share them with the mill. I have r3 collets and a drawbar for my Logan lathe, it's OK. Biggest I have is 1/2, smaller than the 3/4 er32.
      Location: Jersey City NJ USA

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      • #4
        Originally posted by IanPendle View Post
        Hello,

        When I had a Boxford lathe (UK copy of the Southbend) which was about the same capacity as your lathe, I bought the backplate style chuck (plus a backplate of course) and was very happy with it. The reasoning was that I wanted to be able to take advantage of the spindle bore for longer stock. BUT remember the max. size of ER32 is 20mm. so you cannot take full advantage of the 1 inch spindle bore. Also be aware that the full set of collets will likely cost more than either style of chuck.

        HTH, Ian
        ok thank you i might be able to find a full set of er 32 collets on ebay for cheap ill hunt around.
        Last edited by vinny1892; 01-09-2016, 04:57 AM.

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        • #5
          why not go for er40? cheap collets defy the purpose of collets, btw.

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          • #6
            I have an ER32 collet set up that I adapted to my Grizzly. My lathe is similar in size to yours. What I did was purchase an ER32 collet adapter on E-Bay and a back plate from grizzly and put them together. Since I did not want to machine the internal taper that was the easiest method. Yes you give up some capacity but I am well pleased

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            • #7
              I have ER32 with R8 shank for the mill, ER32 with 5C shank for the lathe spindle, spindex, and many other bits of tooling,
              and ER32 with 3MT shank for the lathe tailstock and drill press. With 3 sets of collets, all fitting all the holders it makes for a very versatile setup. I also have ER40 with R8 and 3MT shanks. The ER32 comes in several other flavors including 2MT and backplate style.

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              • #8
                My old Boxford uses 3c collets same as a Southbend 9" which are very accurate and rigid, downside is the limited clamping range, I also have a shop made ER32 chuck for the same lathe which tends to be my "go to" due to it's wide clamping range.

                ER32 19 Collet sets can be had here in the UK from less than £30 Ebay Collets

                Paul

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                • #9
                  I have ER32 adapted to my South Bend 10K. You can cover a wider range of sizes with fewer collets using ER compared to 3C or other collets. ER collets will close down 1mm or about 1/32. 3C collets will only tolerate a couple thousandths undersize.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Illinoyance View Post
                    I have ER32 adapted to my South Bend 10K. You can cover a wider range of sizes with fewer collets using ER compared to 3C or other collets. ER collets will close down 1mm or about 1/32. 3C collets will only tolerate a couple thousandths undersize.
                    Do you have the ER chuck mounted on the spindle nose or in the Morse taper? I'm actively considering putting one on
                    my 10K as I have one on the mill.

                    Thanks,
                    Pete
                    1973 SB 10K .
                    BenchMaster mill.

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                    • #11
                      A different advantage of a nose mounted collet system is you can still put a mandrel handle on the back end of the spindle or a carrier for an index plate. Think about all your eventual uses lathe, mill, collet blocks, dividing heads, grinder.
                      ER is the way to go nowadays, but over time you will probably still end up with 3 different sizes over different machines.

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                      • #12
                        ER40

                        As already suggested, you may want to consider ER40. Thats the way I am going.

                        I was encouraged to get a 5C collet system but they are much more expensive, albeit maybe more accurate.

                        Here's my plan. By a thru the nose ER40 collet chuck. Then buy a ER40 collet system which includes a MT3 holder and a set of complete ER40 collets. Shars is one company that carries that setup. That way I can use the collet system in the lathe spindle with long stock capability and also use the collets in the mill head spindle.

                        I have already purchased the collet chuck. I haven't mounted it yet because the threads on the chuck are M10 but the holes on the spindle only accept M8. Multiple ways to fix this. The radius on the back fits perfectly with no slop so I anticipate some pretty good runout figures but can't tell you that for sure. It is 100 mm recess and 132 mm overall diameter

                        Here are the pictures of the chuck. I bought it from HHIP.com. They are a small firm but seem to get pretty good stuff. We'll have to see what the final accuracy is.





                        You will have to buy an adapter plate to mount to the threaded spindle but they are readily available and you can then easily spin off the chuck and spin on something else.

                        Dave A.
                        P.S. The ER40 system will accomodate .040 differences in diam. supposedly, and an 18? piece set will cover the entire range, instead of having to buy 32nds in a 5C system
                        Last edited by koda2; 01-09-2016, 04:00 PM. Reason: add text

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                        • #13
                          "I was encouraged to get a 5C collet system but they are much more expensive, albeit maybe more accurate."

                          really? more accurate? can you substanciate, please? what data do you have available?

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                          • #14
                            I have a couple ER chucks. One is mounted on an MT3 adapter, another has a mount for the spindle's plate just like a plain back chuck uses.

                            My lathes use clumsy mounting systems for the chucks, and it takes several minutes to dismount one chuck and put a different one on. One lathe spindle has a threaded nose, the other has the plain back with holes for mounting studs to go through. I have ER32 chucks set up for both.


                            For real quick swapping of chucks, the ER32 collet chuck with morse taper is the fastest. Clean the taper with a brush, pop in it, cinch the drawbar slightly. To take it out, loosen the drawbar and a light tap will knock the chuck free. I use that chuck most frequently when doing multiple operations on short pieces.

                            I suspect that a chuck with an MT3 mount is more likely to be accurate than a flat mount that has to register on a lip of a mounting plate.

                            Dan
                            At the end of the project, there is a profound difference between spare parts and extra parts.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by dian View Post
                              "I was encouraged to get a 5C collet system but they are much more expensive, albeit maybe more accurate."

                              really? more accurate? can you substanciate, please? what data do you have available?
                              As with Dan, I suspect that the mounting is the source of inaccuracy. That and the long stickout compared to an "in-spindle" mounting.

                              If, as with some machines, the collet taper is made in the spindle, the accuracy is almost sure to be better than a system where there is a multi-part mounting system interposed between the spindle and collet, even if the tolerances for all the parts on both are identical.
                              1601

                              Keep eye on ball.
                              Hashim Khan

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