Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Steel plate welded to aluminum T-slot extrusion

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #16
    I can weld water to wood,
    so....

    -Doozer
    DZER

    Comment


    • #17
      Water (ice) will weld to almost anything. Even glass.



      Originally posted by Doozer View Post
      I can weld water to wood,
      so....

      -Doozer
      Paul A.
      SE Texas

      Make it fit.
      You can't win and there IS a penalty for trying!

      Comment


      • #18
        If it were done today, it would be a Tuesday Weld.
        http://pauleschoen.com/pix/PM08_P76_P54.png
        Paul , P S Technology, Inc. and MrTibbs
        USA Maryland 21030

        Comment


        • #19
          In the mid '70s I built Navy guided missile frigates. These had steel hulls and aluminum superstructures (remember the gas lines of the '70s?). The two were joined using strips of metal purchased from a vendor. The vendor has two chemically clean plates. One is steel, the other aluminum. They are placed flat together and explosion welded. Then the plates are sawn into strips. As I recall they were about 2" wide and about 1" thick and half was steel and the other half aluminum. And they were welded. Strong. As in, one of the ships I worked on took two Exocet missiles in the Iran-Iraq war and the joint didn't come apart other than the large hole blown in the ship.

          metalmagpie

          Comment


          • #20
            Originally posted by metalmagpie View Post
            In the mid '70s I built Navy guided missile frigates. These had steel hulls and aluminum superstructures (remember the gas lines of the '70s?). The two were joined using strips of metal purchased from a vendor. The vendor has two chemically clean plates. One is steel, the other aluminum. They are placed flat together and explosion welded. Then the plates are sawn into strips. As I recall they were about 2" wide and about 1" thick and half was steel and the other half aluminum. And they were welded. Strong. As in, one of the ships I worked on took two Exocet missiles in the Iran-Iraq war and the joint didn't come apart other than the large hole blown in the ship.

            metalmagpie
            Yup, explosion welding is likely the only way to make an actual weld between dissimilar metals (don't know for sure if stir welding would work, as it is more of a mixing operation than a weld).

            I remember that they produce hundreds of different dissimilar metal combinations with the explosion welding technique and most used in building holding tanks for materials that aren't exactly friendly to basic materials.
            Amount of experience is in direct proportion to the value of broken equipment.

            Comment


            • #21
              Originally posted by Paul Alciatore View Post
              Water (ice) will weld to almost anything. Even glass.
              I know.
              I'm from Buffalo and I own a car.

              -D
              DZER

              Comment


              • #22
                That ain't nothing, I weld all kinds of stuff to tungsten. Steel, aluminum, stainless, you name it.

                Comment


                • #23
                  Ahh, but don't you need a TIG welder to be able to do that?
                  Location- Rugby, Warwickshire. UK

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    Its no wonder why the shop closed.

                    Comment


                    • #25
                      It certainly wasn't because of bad welding. The owner developed some serious health issues and could no longer continue operations. Just the rental on the building was $4000/month, and he had several employees, so their salaries probably meant he had to have $15,000 / month sales to stay afloat. ETI had previously used http://www.westernindustrialmachining.com/ but I was told they went out of business, although their website seems current. Now they have switched back to R&M Manufacturing which was in Westminster but now is in Taneytown.

                      I feel sorry for the guy, who loved the work and also enjoyed playing guitar, but his illness makes that impossible. And now several people are also out of work. It might have been a good business opportunity, but I don't have the skills, money, health, or enthusiasm to take on such an enterprise.
                      http://pauleschoen.com/pix/PM08_P76_P54.png
                      Paul , P S Technology, Inc. and MrTibbs
                      USA Maryland 21030

                      Comment

                      Working...
                      X