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Steel plate welded to aluminum T-slot extrusion

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  • Steel plate welded to aluminum T-slot extrusion

    Among the pieces of metal I scrounged from the machine shop that was closing, I found a piece of aluminum T-slot extrusion welded to a steel plate:





    It is actually steel weld material as verified with a magnet. I didn't know it was possible. How is it done?
    Last edited by PStechPaul; 01-12-2016, 01:52 AM. Reason: duplicate picture
    http://pauleschoen.com/pix/PM08_P76_P54.png
    Paul , P S Technology, Inc. and MrTibbs
    USA Maryland 21030

  • #2
    Originally posted by PStechPaul View Post
    how is it done?
    I'll go with the obvious answer. .. poorly!

    Comment


    • #3
      It's amazing what can be done when you don't know it can't be done!

      Comment


      • #4
        Think of it as hot glue- it isn't a weld (admixture). The arc pits the looneyum and steel fills the pits. An expedient but with low mechanicals. (stress resistance)
        It can be done with copper using steel stick, best with cellulose flux since a long arc is played to get preheat.
        A tidy joint can be made if preheat is by torch, but again, no mechanicals.

        Comment


        • #5
          Maybe it formed an alloy - steeluminium.

          Go on, snap one off - let us know how much of a fight it puts up.

          Ian
          All of the gear, no idea...

          Comment


          • #6
            Not a proper weld unless it was done with explosives.
            Amount of experience is in direct proportion to the value of broken equipment.

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            • #7
              I've welded aluminum to stainless before. Yes it somewhat can be done but there is no strength to it what so ever. Like mentioned the weld basically acts like a glue, there is no real "fusion".
              Andy

              Comment


              • #8
                And then there is this------
                www.alumasteeltigrod.com
                Never used it don't know if it works but sounds interesting.
                Bill
                Last edited by Seastar; 01-12-2016, 10:55 AM.
                I cut it off twice and it's still too short!

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Carm View Post
                  Think of it as hot glue- it isn't a weld (admixture). The arc pits the looneyum and steel fills the pits...
                  Exactly. It's not a true weld because there is no fusion. If you build up enough steel around the aluminum it will hold it in place mechanically but with very low strength. Strictly a farmer or backyarder way of doing things. The only way to properly join aluminum and steel is with a bolted connection...
                  Keith
                  __________________________
                  Just one project too many--that's what finally got him...

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by LKeithR View Post
                    Exactly. It's not a true weld because there is no fusion. If you build up enough steel around the aluminum it will hold it in place mechanically but with very low strength. Strictly a farmer or backyarder way of doing things. The only way to properly join aluminum and steel is with a bolted connection...
                    Hey watch it! Us farmers would never do something like that!
                    How to become a millionaire: Start out with 10 million and take up machining as a hobby!

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      www.alumasteeltigrod.com
                      Instead of saying it can't be done why don't one of you buy some aluma-steel TIG rods and try it.
                      I don't have TIG or I would try it.
                      Maybe they have something new and useful.
                      Bill
                      I cut it off twice and it's still too short!

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by LKeithR View Post
                        snip) The only way to properly join aluminum and steel is with a bolted connection...
                        Well...(pause)... There is a way to weld the two. Essentially butter the joints with compatible alloys 'til you get there. Done it for fun, but never in practice.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Seastar View Post
                          www.alumasteeltigrod.comsnip)
                          Instead of saying it can't be done why don't one of you buy some aluma-steel TIG rods and try it.
                          Bill
                          Watched the vid in your link. It is a buttering technique with alloy compatible with the transition. I watched the whole thing, saw him stuff the tungsten around 7:50. Not my definition of "pulsing" but blah blah woof woof. It can be done with oxy/acetylene too.
                          Weakest link in the chain and galvanic reaction still applies.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            I figured that, most likely, the steel weld material melted and filled cavities in the aluminum and made a mechanical joint similar to a clamp. If the weld mostly surrounds the mating part of the aluminum, it should be pretty strong, and if the steel shrinks more than the aluminum, it will also tend to clamp tightly. I only have this one piece made this way. There is another one that has a "proper" bolted joint. I doubt this was ever intended to be used for anything - more likely a bar bet among the redneck employees at the shop.
                            http://pauleschoen.com/pix/PM08_P76_P54.png
                            Paul , P S Technology, Inc. and MrTibbs
                            USA Maryland 21030

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              I thought it was probably a foot on a vertical AL post under compression?
                              Bill
                              I cut it off twice and it's still too short!

                              Comment

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