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Steel plate welded to aluminum T-slot extrusion

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  • PStechPaul
    replied
    It certainly wasn't because of bad welding. The owner developed some serious health issues and could no longer continue operations. Just the rental on the building was $4000/month, and he had several employees, so their salaries probably meant he had to have $15,000 / month sales to stay afloat. ETI had previously used http://www.westernindustrialmachining.com/ but I was told they went out of business, although their website seems current. Now they have switched back to R&M Manufacturing which was in Westminster but now is in Taneytown.

    I feel sorry for the guy, who loved the work and also enjoyed playing guitar, but his illness makes that impossible. And now several people are also out of work. It might have been a good business opportunity, but I don't have the skills, money, health, or enthusiasm to take on such an enterprise.

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  • randy_m
    replied
    Its no wonder why the shop closed.

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  • Mark Rand
    replied
    Ahh, but don't you need a TIG welder to be able to do that?

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  • oxford
    replied
    That ain't nothing, I weld all kinds of stuff to tungsten. Steel, aluminum, stainless, you name it.

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  • Doozer
    replied
    Originally posted by Paul Alciatore View Post
    Water (ice) will weld to almost anything. Even glass.
    I know.
    I'm from Buffalo and I own a car.

    -D

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  • Jaakko Fagerlund
    replied
    Originally posted by metalmagpie View Post
    In the mid '70s I built Navy guided missile frigates. These had steel hulls and aluminum superstructures (remember the gas lines of the '70s?). The two were joined using strips of metal purchased from a vendor. The vendor has two chemically clean plates. One is steel, the other aluminum. They are placed flat together and explosion welded. Then the plates are sawn into strips. As I recall they were about 2" wide and about 1" thick and half was steel and the other half aluminum. And they were welded. Strong. As in, one of the ships I worked on took two Exocet missiles in the Iran-Iraq war and the joint didn't come apart other than the large hole blown in the ship.

    metalmagpie
    Yup, explosion welding is likely the only way to make an actual weld between dissimilar metals (don't know for sure if stir welding would work, as it is more of a mixing operation than a weld).

    I remember that they produce hundreds of different dissimilar metal combinations with the explosion welding technique and most used in building holding tanks for materials that aren't exactly friendly to basic materials.

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  • metalmagpie
    replied
    In the mid '70s I built Navy guided missile frigates. These had steel hulls and aluminum superstructures (remember the gas lines of the '70s?). The two were joined using strips of metal purchased from a vendor. The vendor has two chemically clean plates. One is steel, the other aluminum. They are placed flat together and explosion welded. Then the plates are sawn into strips. As I recall they were about 2" wide and about 1" thick and half was steel and the other half aluminum. And they were welded. Strong. As in, one of the ships I worked on took two Exocet missiles in the Iran-Iraq war and the joint didn't come apart other than the large hole blown in the ship.

    metalmagpie

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  • PStechPaul
    replied
    If it were done today, it would be a Tuesday Weld.

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  • Paul Alciatore
    replied
    Water (ice) will weld to almost anything. Even glass.



    Originally posted by Doozer View Post
    I can weld water to wood,
    so....

    -Doozer

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  • Doozer
    replied
    I can weld water to wood,
    so....

    -Doozer

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  • Seastar
    replied
    I thought it was probably a foot on a vertical AL post under compression?
    Bill

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  • PStechPaul
    replied
    I figured that, most likely, the steel weld material melted and filled cavities in the aluminum and made a mechanical joint similar to a clamp. If the weld mostly surrounds the mating part of the aluminum, it should be pretty strong, and if the steel shrinks more than the aluminum, it will also tend to clamp tightly. I only have this one piece made this way. There is another one that has a "proper" bolted joint. I doubt this was ever intended to be used for anything - more likely a bar bet among the redneck employees at the shop.

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  • Carm
    replied
    Originally posted by Seastar View Post
    www.alumasteeltigrod.comsnip)
    Instead of saying it can't be done why don't one of you buy some aluma-steel TIG rods and try it.
    Bill
    Watched the vid in your link. It is a buttering technique with alloy compatible with the transition. I watched the whole thing, saw him stuff the tungsten around 7:50. Not my definition of "pulsing" but blah blah woof woof. It can be done with oxy/acetylene too.
    Weakest link in the chain and galvanic reaction still applies.

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  • Carm
    replied
    Originally posted by LKeithR View Post
    snip) The only way to properly join aluminum and steel is with a bolted connection...
    Well...(pause)... There is a way to weld the two. Essentially butter the joints with compatible alloys 'til you get there. Done it for fun, but never in practice.

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  • Seastar
    replied
    www.alumasteeltigrod.com
    Instead of saying it can't be done why don't one of you buy some aluma-steel TIG rods and try it.
    I don't have TIG or I would try it.
    Maybe they have something new and useful.
    Bill

    Leave a comment:

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